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Saturday, November 22, 2014

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Make a Timeline for an Ancestor



Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It's Saturday Night again - 
time for some more Genealogy Fun!!



Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):


1) Have you created a Timeline for one of your ancestors using a genealogy software program (e.g., Family Tree Maker, RootsMagic, Legacy, Reunion, etc.) or an online family Tree (e.g., Ancestry Member Tree, FamilySearch Family Tree, Geni, MyHeritage, etc.), or in a spreadsheet (e.g., Excel) or in a word processor table?


2)  If not, try to create a timeline using the program/website of your choice.  If so, create another one for the ancestor of your choice!

3)  Show us your Timeline creation, and tell us how you did it.  Which program/website did you use, the process you used, and how you captured the images to display your timeline.

4)  Share your Timeline creation on your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.

Here's mine:

2)  I chose to use the RootsMagic 6 genealogy software program, which has both a Timeline View and a Timeline Report.  I chose my great-grandfather, Henry Austin Carringer (1853-1946) for this exercise.

3)  Here is the "Timeline View" format in RootsMagic 6:



The "Timeline View" for a person has columns for "Age," "Facts," "Date," "Details," "place" and icons for Notes, Sources, and Media (the green check marks)   The "Timeline View" added the immediate family members (parents, siblings, spouses, children) to the list without my having to request it (you can select the options in the "Options" button on the "Timeline View" menu).  I really like this view, but, other than using a screen capture like above, I could not find a way to print out this list in color 

The second option to produce a Timeline is to use the Reports menu > Lists item > Timeline (chronology) item, and select "Individual Timeline list," select a person from the "Select others to include in timeline," select the person, and then create a group by using "Mark group" and picking "Family of highlighted person" (which adds parents, siblings, spouses and children events).

Here are the two pages for the Timeline:



I also requested "Sources" in an Endnote format (three screens):



The process:  After I made the Timeline Report, I saved it as a PDF file.  I opened the PDF file, and used the Windows Snipping Tool to capture each page as an image, which I added to a presentation document, then saved each image, and then added the images to this blog post.

This "Timeline (chronology)" report is very plain - but it is very useful.  I love having the sources provided as an option.  I saved this timeline report to Henry Austin Carringer's family file.

I would like to see a little more information about the relationships - for instance, identify the family persons as son, daughter, wife, father, mother, brother, sister, etc.  Ideally, some color would be helpful too.

4)  I did it above!


Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Surname Saturday -- NICHOLS (England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am in the 8th great-grandmothers and I'm up to Ancestor #1063 who is Rachel NICHOLS (!654-1722) 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 8th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts].

My ancestral line back through one generation in this NICHOLS family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)


66.  Nathan Gates (1767-1830)
67.  Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)

132.  Simon Gates (1739-1803)
133.  Susannah Reed (1745-1833)

264.  Amos Gates (1706-1783)
265.  Mary Hubbard (1712-1754)

530.  Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753)
531.  Sarah Clark (1681-1720)


1062.  Samuel Clark, born before 01 November 1646 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; died 30 January 1730 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 2124. Arthur Clark and 2125. Sarah.  He married about 1676 in probably Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States.
1063.  Rachel Nichols, born July 1654 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; died 19 October 1722 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of Samuel Clark and Rachel Nichols are:
*  Samuel Clark (1676-????).
*  William Clark (1679-1756), married 1706 Eunice Taylor (1678-1761).
*  Sarah Clark (1681-1720), married 1709 Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753)
*  Rachel Clark (1683-????)
*  Susanna Clark (1689-????).
*  Hannah Clark (1691-????), married 1713 Jonathan Ball (1691-????).
*  Benjamin Clark (1693-????).
*  Arthur Clark (1696????).

The only record I have for Rachel (Nichols) Clark is her burial record on Find A Grave.  Apparently, no researcher has been able to find a set of parents for Rachel.  A check of vital records shows that Randolph Nichols had children in Charlestown during the 1650s, but Rachel is not listed as one of them.  It is possible that she was born in some other Massachusetts Bay town, or even in England.

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Friday, November 21, 2014

New or Updated Ancestry.com Databases - November 15-21, 2014

The following databases were added or updated on Ancestry.com during the period from 15 to 21 November 2014.

*  New South Wales, Australia, Court Records, 1830-1945; 202,214 records, NEW 20 November 2014

*  New York, Sing Sing Prison Admission Registers, 1865-1939; 69,621 records, NEW 20 November 2014

*  New York, Clinton Prison Admission Ledgers, 1851-1866, 1926-1939; 4,292 records, NEW 20 November 2014
Yesterday

*  U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; 113,551,253 records, Updated 20 November 2014

*  Pennsylvania, Death Certificates, 1906-1963; 7,051,081 records, Updated 20 November 2014

*  Savannah, Georgia, Land Tax and Property Records, 1809-1938; 530,669 records, Updated 19 November 2014


*  Czechoslovakia, Social Welfare and Repatriation Records of Holocaust Survivors, 1939-1948 (USHMM); 19,422 records, NEW 18 November 2014



The recently added or updated page on Ancestry.com is http://www.ancestry.com/cs/reccol/default.

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at  http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  There are 32,495 databases available as of today, an increase of 2 over last week. [How can that be?  They have four NEW items on the list above since 11/11/2014.  Strange, unless they miscounted last week, or an earlier week.]

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/11/new-or-updated-ancestrycom-databases_21.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Updated List of PERSI Collections with Page Images

The FindMyPast Blog post today is The Latest PERSI Image Update and lists 18 periodicals with newly added or updated page images.  PERSI is the PERiodical Source Index that was developed by Allen County (ind.) Public Library to catalog genealogy-related periodical articles.

The list of all of the currently available PERSI-indexed periodicals with page images is here.

There are currently 48 PERSI-indexed publications with images (note, only top of the list is shown below):



I discussed using PERSI on FindMyPast in:

*  Tuesday's Tip - Find Periodical Sources in PERSI - the Periodical Source Index on FindMyPast (posted 4 February 2014)

*  Finding NYGBR Images Using PERSI on FindMyPast.com - UPDATED (posted 9 October 2014).

This is good news for all researchers - there is a gold mine of information in periodical articles indexed by PERSI.  Users need to remember that this is not an every name search engine - the index is for periodical titles, authors, etc.  If a surname was listed in an article title, you will find it by searching for the surname.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/11/updated-list-of-persi-collections-with.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


So Many Matches, So Little Time! How Do I Deal With Information Overload?

This week's Wacky Wednesday Hangout On Air with DearMYRTLE focused on "Information Overload."  You can watch it on YouTube at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uMHpg0Y8inQ.

The audience comments are shown on Google+ at  https://plus.google.com/102461242403735457058/posts/HSZhPPM9GxA



The panelists were Johanna Inari (from Lapland, DearMYRTLE's distant cousin), Russ Worthington, Dave Robison, John Laws (early on) and Carol Petranek (near the end).   I would have joined the panel if I was home, but I was in Orange County valiantly trying to get to the 7 p.m. GSNOCC meeting on time so I could give my presentation.

1)  There were several interesting and useful suggestions, including:

a)  Create an EXCEL file for each record type and systematically mine the available online records for persons in your family tree (could use Ancestry Leaf Hints, or MyHeritage Record Matches, etc.)

b)  Using your online Family Trees to generate Hints and systematically mine them.  My brief review of my online trees revealed that:

  • Ancestry Green Leaf Hints for persons in my Ancestry Member Tree ($$, separate tree):  I look at Leaf Hints for my ancestors, and by database (e.g. 1940 US Census) for persons in my AMT.  Ancestry also tells me if another researcher has added one of my media items to their tree.
  • FamilySearch Family Tree (free, universal tree) offers Record Hints for each person; and provides a weekly email summary of Family Tree changes for profiles that I am watching (over 300 of them - some of my ancestors).  
  • My Heritage ($$, separate tree)) offers Record Matches for persons in my MyHeritage family tree, organized by person or by database.  I prefer the "by database" method, and have systematically reviewed and added content to my tree - about 2,600 Find A Grave entries, about 1,400 Social Security Death Index entries, some Newspaper Archives entries, and entries from several other databases.  I receive a weekly email summary of changes that others make to persons in my tree in their trees.
  • WikiTree (free, universal tree) offers Match requests from other researchers.  They also provide a weekly email summary of contributions from other researchers who have added content to profiles for whom I am a profile manager.  I can see changes to persons in this tree.
  • Geni ($$, universal tree) offers suggested Matches in a weekly email summary, which I rarely find useful (many are not the right person).  I can see the contributions of other researchers who have added content to profiles in the tree.
  • WeRelate (free, universal tree) offers no record hints, but I can access the contributions of other researchers which are usually well done.
  • FindMyPast ($$, separate tree) offers no hints yet, but probably will in the future. 
  • Mocavo ($$, separate tree) offers no hints yet, but might in the future (since they are now owned by FindMyPast).
  • I have online family trees on other websites also, but can't recall them all, and don't actively use them!

c)  DearMYRTLE showed some spreadsheet possibilities for systematically searching for records on specific websites and on FHL microfilm, based on the FamilySearch Resource Checklist form (see  https://familysearch.org/learn/wiki/en/Resource_Checklist).

2)  I have not used a spreadsheet to organize my searches to date.  If I did, I would want to consider:

a)  Each ancestral family by record type (e.g., vital, census, military, immigration, newspaper, cemetery, family, books, periodicals, directories, archives, online trees, etc.).  I have created word processor tables that do this.  I usually use them only for "problem ancestors."

b)  Each surname by record collection or database, sorted by record provider (e.g., Ancestry, FamilySearch, AmericanAncestors, MyHeritage, Fold3, FindMyPast, Mocavo, etc.).   The record providers add databases, and record Hints, on a continuous basis.  I often mine specific collections (e.g., the 1940 U.S. census), and need to keep better track of what I have already done.

3)  My RootsMagic family tree software provides a way to capture all of the information I have collected in Facts (birth, death, marriage, residence, census, land, probate, etc.), along with Notes, Sources and Media items.

a)  I have over 43,000 persons in the database, but I don't continuously search for everyone in my database.  I search new databases for my ancestors to pull records into my database, but I let the Hints from each record provider push information into my database.

b)  I add all of the information that I glean from these websites, and from my research at repositories, to my RootsMagic family tree database.  I can also interact with FamilySearch Family Tree using RootsMagic.  Occasionally, I make a GEDCOM file and add a new tree at Ancestry and other online tree sites so that I can share my work and perhaps find new cousins.

c)  I use the Research Manager and To-Do List in RootsMagic, usually created for specific families, to try to keep up with what I have done, and need to find online or in repositories.  I can sort the To-Do list be repository so that I can focus on records at a specific repository (e.g., the Family History Library).

4)  I try to deal with Information Overload the best I can in the time I have available.

a)  I check Ancestry.com and FamilySearch every day for new record databases, and try to mine the ones of significant interest soon after they appear, adding events, notes, sources and media to the RootsMagic database.

b)  I work on the MyHeritage Record Matches by specific database, and the Ancestry.com Leaf Hints by specific database, as often as I can to add content and sources to my database.

5)  What is your favorite way to keep up with Information Overload?  Tell me and my readers!

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/11/how-do-i-deal-with-information-overload.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 47: #54, Samuel Vaux (1816-1880)

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" in her blog post Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  Here is my ancestor biography for week #47:

Samuel Vaux is #54 on my Ahnentafel list, my third great-grandfather.  He married in about 1839  to #55 Mary Ann Underhill (1815-1883).


I am descended through:

*  their daughter, 
#27, Abigail A. Vaux (1844-1931), who married #26 Devier J. Smith  (1839-1894),  in 1861.
*  their daughter, #13 Abbie Ardell "Della" Smith (1862-1944) who married #12 Henry Austin Carringer (1853-1946) in 1887.
*  their son, #6 Lyle Lawrence Carringer (1891-1976), married Emily Kemp Auble (1899-1977) in 1918. 
* their daughter, #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002), who married Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) in 1942.
*  their son, #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

 =====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                         Samuel Vaux[1–11]   
*  Sex:                            Male   

*  Father:                       James Vaux (1787-1839)   
*  Mother:                     Mary Palmer (1788-1844)   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL FACTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   


*  Birth:                         14 January 1816, South Petherton, Somerset, England[1]
*  Christened:                11 February 1816 (age 0), South Petherton, Somerset, England[2,10]
*  Deed:                         29 March 1845 (age 29), of Aurora, N.Y. bought 53 acres in the southwest portion of Lot 22 from Seth Sprague; the northeast corner of Center Street and Hubbard Road, Aurora, Erie, New York, United States[3]   
*  Census:                      1 June 1850 (age 34), Aurora, Erie, New York, United States[4]
*  Occupation:               1 June 1850 (age 34), Farmer; Aurora, Erie, New York, United States[4]
*  Deed:                         21 July 1853 (age 37), sold 53 acres in the southwest portion of Lot 22 to Robert Bartlett; the northeast corner of Center Street and Hubbard Road, Aurora, Erie, New York, United States[5]  
*  Census:                     1 June 1855 (age 39), Burnett, Dodge, Wisconsin, United States[6]
*  Deed:                        4 August 1869 (age 53), bought 40 acres in the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 21 in Township 61 of Range 33; Andrew, Missouri, United States[7]   
*  Census:                    1 June 1870 (age 54), Platte, Andrew, Missouri, United States[8]
*  Occupation:             1 June 1870 (age 54), Farmer; Platte, Andrew, Missouri, United States[8]
*  Deed:                       31 January 1880 (age 64), sold 40 acres in the Southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 21 in Township 61 of Range 33; Andrew, Missouri, United States[9]
*  Census:                    1 June 1880 (age 64), Blue Rapids, Marshall, Kansas, United States[10]
*  Death:                      9 October 1880 (age 64), Concordia, Cloud, Kansas, United States[1]
*  Burial:                     after 9 October 1880 (after age 64), Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Concordia, Cloud, Kansas, United States[1]
  
3)  SHARED FACTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

*  Spouse 1:                 Mary Ann Underhill (1815-1883)   
*  Marriage:                before 1839 (before about age 23), Aurora, Erie, New York, United States[11]

*  Child 1:                  Mary Almeda Vaux (1839-    )   
*  Child 2:                  Celia Ann Vaux (1842-1919)   
*  Child 3:                  Abigail A. "Abbie" Vaux (1844-1931)   
*  Child 4:                  James P. Vaux (1847-1902)   
*  Child 5:                  Elizabeth B. Vaux (1850-1931)   
*  Child 6:                  Amos S. Vaux (1854-1876)   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

Samuel Vaux was the fourth of ten children born to James Vaux and Mary Palmer in South Petherton, Somerset.  The birth date of 14 January 1816 for Samuel Vaux was obtained from his gravestone and burial record.[1]  

The baptism record of Samuel Vaux in South Petherton, Somerset on 11 February 1816 lists his parents as James and Mary Vaux.[2]  This is consistent with his birth on 11 February 1816. 

Samuel Vaux emigrated from Somerset in England to Erie County, New York, probably with his parents and several of his siblings, before 1837.

The 1850, 1870 and 1880 U.S. Census records indicate that a Mary Ann was married to Samuel Vaux.  The death certificate of their daughter, Abigail (Vaux) Smith in San Diego, San Diego county, California identifies her parents her Samuel Vaux and Mary Ann Underhill.[11]

The exact date of his marriage to Mary Ann Underhill, probably in Aurora, Erie county, New York, is not known, and no record has been found.  The first child of Samuel and Mary Ann (Underhill) Vaux was born in about 1839, so a marriage date of "before 1839" is very likely.  In 1839, Samuel was age 24 and Mary Ann was age 23, so this is a feasible approximate date.

Samuel and Mary Ann (Underhill) Vaux had six children, born between 1839 and 1854, all apparently in Aurora, Erie County, New York.

On 29 March 1845, Samuel Vaux of Aurora, Erie County, New York bought land in Erie county from Seth Sprague for $795.[3]  The land was in the southwest corner of Lot 22 and comprised 53 acres, known as the Sprague farm.  The plot was bounded  North by lands heretofore owned by Lawrence Woodruff, West by the highway, South by the highway, and East by lands owned by Hezekiah Masten.  The deed was recorded in Erie county on 10 April 1845.

In the 1850 census, the Samuel Vaux family resided in Aurora township, Erie County, New York. The family included:[4]

*  Samuel Vaux, age 34, male, a farmer, $1166 in real property, born England
*  Mary Ann Vaux, age 35, female, born NY
*  Mary Vaux, age 11, female, born NY, attends school
*  Cele Ann Vaux, age 9, female, born NY, attends school
*  Abagail Vaux, age 5, female, born NY, attends school
*  Jane Vaux, age 3, female, born NY

On 25 July 1853, Samuel Vaux and Mary Ann, his wife, of the town of Aurora sold land in Aurora township, Erie County, New York to Robert Bartlett of the town of Sullivan, New York for $1,500.[5]  The land comprised 53 acres, and was in the southwest corner of Lot 22, called the Sprague farm.  The land was bounded on the North by land owned by Gordon Pierson, West by the highway, South by the highway, and East by lands owned by Hezekiah Mosher.  The deed was recorded in Erie County on 1 September 1855.

The family moved from Aurora, Erie County, New York to Burnett township, Dodge County, Wisconsin before 1854.  

In the 1855 Wisconsin State Census, Saml Vaux was head of household with:[6]

*  2 white males

*  4 white females

S. Vaux appears on the 1859 Plat map in Section 29 of Burnett township, Dodge County, Wisconsin, near to the land of R. Smith.

A search of the 1860 census for Dodge County, Wisconsin failed to find this family.

Samuel and Mary Ann (Underhill) Vaux bought land in Andrew County, Missouri on 4 August 1869 from Mary Jane and L.S. Munger for $2,000.[7] The land was the Southeast quarter of the Southeast quarter of Section 21 in Township 61 of Range 33, containing forty acres.  The entry in the deed book reads:

[in margin]
Mary Jane Munger et al
to Warranty
Samuel Vaux
N_o_. 1605

"Know all men by these presents. That Mary Jane Munger and L.S. Munger of the County of Buchanan in the State of Missouri have this day for and in Consideration of the sum of Two thousand Dollars to the said Mary Jane Munger and L.S. Munger in hand paid by Samuel Vaux of the County of Andrew in the State of Missouri have granted, bargained and sold and by these presents do grant, bargain and sell unto the said Samuel Vaux the following described tracts or parcels of land situate in the County of Andrew  in the State of Missouri that is to say (The South East quarter of the South East quarter of Section twenty one (21) Township sixty one (61) of Range thirty three (33)) To have and to hold the premises hereby conveyed, with all the rights, privileges and appurtenances thereto belonging or in anywise appertaining unto the said Samuel Vaux his heirs and assigns forever we the said Mary Jane Munger and L.S. Munger hereby covenanting to and with the said Samuel Vaux his heirs and assigns for their heirs, executors and administrators to warrant and defend the title to the premises hereby conveyed against the Claim of every person whatsoever.

"In Witness whereof we have hereto subscribed our name and affixed our seals this fourth day of August, 1869.
Mary Jane Munger [ seal]
L.S. Munger [seal]

"State of Missouri   }  ss
County of Buchanan}
Be it remembered, that Mary Jane Munger and L.S. Munger her husband who are personally known to the undersigned a Notary Public within and for said County, to be the persons whose names are subscribed to the foregoing deed in parties thereto this day appeared before me, and acknowledged that they executed and delivered the same as their voluntary act and deed for the use and purposes theirin contained, and the said __________________ being by me made acquainted with the Contents of said Deed, acknowledged, on an examination apart from the said husband: that she executed the same and relinquishes her dower in the real estate therein mentioned, freely and without Compulsion or undue influence of her said husband. given under my hand and Notarial Seal this fourth day of August, 1869.                                  
 W.S. Johnson [L.S.] Notary Public
Filed August 17th 1869       }
Wm Caldwell Recorder        }
By Jno. E. Wuldins Deputy. }

In the 1870 census for Andrew County, Missouri, this family resided in Platte township, Andrew County, Missouri.[8]  The household included:

*  Samuel Vaux -- age 51, male, white, a farmer, $3500 in real property, $490 in personal property, born England, parents foreign born
*  Mary A. Vaux -- age 50, female, white, keeping house, born NY
*  James P. Vaux -- age 23, male, white, a farm laborer, born NY
*  Elizabeth Vaux -- age 19, female, white, at home, born NY
*  Amos Vaux -- age 15, male, white, a farm laborer, born NY, attended school
*  James Woodward -- age 33, male, white, a farm laborer, $500 in personal property, born VT
*  Mary A. Woodward -- age 31, female, white, keeping house, born NY, father foreign born
*  Orpha A. Woodward -- age 7, female, white, born WI, attended school
*  Mary Woodward -- age 4, female, white, born WI

Samuel and Mary Ann (Underhill) Vaux sold land in Andrew County, Missouri on 31 January 1880 to William H. Bulla for $800.[9]  The land was the Southeast quarter of the southeast quarter of Section 21 in Township 61 of Range 33, containing forty acres.  The entry in the deed book reads:

"This Indenture, Made on the _thirty first_ day of _January_ A.D. One Thousand Eight Hundred and Eighty _----_by and between _Samuel Vaux and Mary A. Vaux his wife of Andrew county and__State_ of _Missouri_, part_y_ of the First Part, and _William H. Bulla_ in the County of _Andrew_ and State of _Missouri_, part_y_ of the Second Part: WITNESSETH, That the said part_ies_ of the First Part, in consideration of the sum of _Eight Hundred 00/100_ Dollars, to _them_ paid by the said part_y_ of the Second Part, the receipt of which is hereby acknowledged, do_es_ by these presents GRANT, BARGAIN AND SELL, CONVEY AND CONFIRM, unto the said part_y_ of the Second Part, _his_ heirs and assigns, the following described Lots, Tracts or Parcels of Land, lying, being and situate in the County of _Andrew_ and State of Missouri, to wit: All _the South East quarter of the south East_ _quarter of Section twenty one (21) in Township Sixty-one (61) of Range thirty three_ _(33) containing forty acres according to Government survey more or less_

TO HAVE AND TO HOLD the premises aforesaid, with all and singular rights, privileges, appurtenances and immunities thereto belonging, or in anywise appertaining, unto the said part_y_ of the Second Part, and unto _his_ heirs and assigns, forever; the said _parties of the first part__---_ hereby covenanting that _they are_ lawfully seized of an indefeasible estate in fee in the premises herein convened; that _they_ ha_ve_ good right to convey the same; that the said premises are free and clear of any encumbrances done or suffered by _them_ or those under whom _they_ claim; and that _they_ will WARRANT AND DEFEND the title to the said premises unto the said part_y_ of the Second Part, and unto _his_ heirs and assigns, forever, against the lawful claims and demands of all persons whomsoever.

IN WITNESS WHEREOF, The said part_ies_ of the First Part, ha_ve_ hereunto set _this_ hand_s_ and seal_s_ the day and year first above written.

Signed, Sealed and Delivered in presence of us, Samuel Vaux [seal] J. Bonham Mary Ann Vaux [seal]

This deed was recorded on 7 September 1881 at 1 o'clock 2 minutes P.M. by S.E. Seer, Recorder.

In the 1880 US Census, this family resided in Blue Rapids township, Marshall County, Kansas. The household included:[10]

*  Abagail A. Smith -- white, female, age 36, married, keeps house, born NY, father born England, mother born NY
*  Della Smith -- white, female, age 18, daughter, single, at home, born WI, father and mother born NY
*  Mary A. Smith -- white, female, age 14, daughter, single, born WI, father and mother born NY
*  Samuel Vaux -- white, male, age 65, father-in-law, married, without occupation, born England, father and mother born England
*  Mary A. Vaux -- white, female, age 65, mother, married, without occupation, born NY father born VT, mother born NH
*  Orpha Woodward -- white, female, age 17, niece, single, at home, born WI, father born VT, mother born NY.

Neither Samuel or Mary Ann Vaux were found in the 1885 Kansas State Census.

Samuel Vaux died in Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas, where his daughter, Abigail A. (Vaux) Smith resided at the time.  was buried in Pleasant Hill Cemetery in Concordia, Cloud County, Kansas.[1]  The inscription on his gravestone says:

"Samuel Vaux
Born
 Jan. 14, 1816
Died
Oct. 9, 1880"

Probate records for Samuel or Mary Ann Vaux have not been found to date in Andrew County, Missouri, Marshall County, Kansas, or Cloud County, Kansas.
 \
5)  SOURCES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

1. Jim Tipton, indexed database, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com), Pleasant Hill Cemetery, Concordia, Kan., Samuel Vaux memorial # 96353708 (with gravestone photograph).

2. Church of England, Parish Church of South Petherton (South Petherton, Somerset), South Petherton Parish Registers, Baptisms, 1813-1842, Register #117, Samuel Vaux, son of James and Mary, 11 February 1816; accessed on FHL BRITISH Microfilm 1,526,363, Item 10.

3. New York, "New York, Land Records, 1630-1975,"  digital images,  Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 2 February 2013), "Erie County New York Deeds, 1844-1850, Volumes 78-79," image 184 of 792, in Volume 78, Page 396, Samuel Vaux deed in Aurora, N.Y. from Seth Sprague, 1845; citing original records in New York Land Office. New York, Land Records. Holland Land Office Museum, Batavia, New York.

4. 1850 United States Federal Census, Erie County, New York, population schedule, Aurora township; Page 103, Dwelling #1589, Family #1605, Samuel Vaux household, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, Roll 498.

5. "New York, Land Records, 1630-1975," Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 2 February 2013), digital images, "Erie County, New York Deeds, 1852-1853, Volumes 142-143," Volume 142, Page 21, Samuel Vaux deed in Aurora, N.Y. to Robert Bartlett, 1853.

6. "Wisconsin State Census, 1855," indexed database and digital image, FamilySearch.org (https://www.familysearch.org), Dodge County, Burnett, Saml Vaux household, image 45 of 143.

7. Andrew County, Missouri, "Andrew County Deed Records, 1841-1900," Deed Book 22: page 406, Mary Jane and L.S. Munger to Samuel and Mary Ann Vaux, 4 August 1869; FHL microfilm US/CAN 1,006,163.

8. 1870 United States Federal Census, Andrew County, Missouri, Population Schedule, Platte township: Page 304 (stamped), Dwelling #314, Family #319, Samuel Vaux household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M593, Roll 755.

9. Andrew County, Missouri, "Andrew County Deed Records, 1841-1900", Deed Book 43, page 565, Samuel and Mary Ann Vaux to William H. Bulla, 31 January 1880; accessed on FHL microfilm US/CAN 1,006,174.

10. Sara Anson Vaux, The Vaux Family of England, the United States, and Australia (unpublished), Samuel Vaux Christening entry, 1816.


11. San Diego County, California, Standard Certificate of Death, Abbie A. Smith, 11 September 1931; State of California, Department of Health Services, No. 31-050190 (certificate dated 18 June 1996).


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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/11/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-47-54.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Thursday, November 20, 2014

Dear Randy: How Have You Saved Your Research So Someone Can Search For It?

I get this question occasionally.  It usually includes the words "for free."

My answer usually takes two tacks:

1)  Put your research in a public family tree on, for instance:

*  Rootsweb WorldConnect - http://wc.rootsweb.ancestry.com  -- This site is free to upload a GEDCOM file to, and the information can include notes and sources.  This is a separate family tree - yours!  Persons can be found with most search engines.

*  WikiTree - http://www.wikitree.com -- This site is free to upload a GEDCOM file to.  This is a "universal" family tree where each historical person has a profile.  Someone may change your information.  Persons can be found with most search engines.

*  WeRelate - http://www.werelate.org -- This site is free to upload a GEDCOM file to.  This is a "universal" family tree where each historical person has a profile.  Someone may change your information.  Persons can be found with most search engines.

*  FamilySearch Family Tree - https://familysearch.org/tree/ -- This site is free to add information to, but has no general GEDCOM upload.  This is a "universal" family tree where each historical person has a profile.  Someone may change your information.  Persons cannot be found with most search engines.

*  There are other online family trees with separate trees - yours.  They include Ancestry (free to upload and add, $ to use search functions); MyHeritage ($ for over 250 persons); Geni.com ($ for over 500 persons); GeneaNet (free to upload); FindMyPast (free to upload?); Mocavo (free to upload); and many others.  Persons and information in these trees cannot be searched with most search engines, only from within the website.

2)  Put material on the Internet by writing genealogy reports that define my genealogical research.  I do this using my genealogy family tree software and creating descendants reports and ancestor reports.  For example:

*  In 2012, I made 16 different reports in an attempt to document, with names, dates, places and sources, but not notes) and uploaded them, for FREE, to Scribd (www.scribd.com).  You can see my reports at https://www.scribd.com/randy_seaver .

They are searchable by many of the usual search engines (i.e., Google, Bing, Yahoo, etc.).  Here is the page with all of my reports (two screens shown):



Here is the top of the first page (the title page) of one of my reports:


Here is the first text page, of 382 total pages.  There are footnotes on the bottom of each page.


There is a name index at the end of this report.

You can read them, or download them as PDF files.

These reports were generated by the Legacy Family Tree software program, which I find is the best to do this task.  The information is based on my conclusions at the time I created the report.  Any errors or omissions are mine.

I limited the descendants reports so that there are very few persons born in the 20th century.  There are some, but I tried to avoid having living people in the reports.

I put links to all of the reports on my Randy's Genealogy web page.

I get several queries each month from these Scribd reports.  Usually, a correspondent says something like "your report has my John Seaver, what else do you know about him?  He's my 6th great-grandfather."

Bingo, I just found another likely cousin, and they found me.  I can help them with their line back to our common ancestor, but usually cannot help them with an entire genealogy because their line back to the named ancestor is not in my database, and I haven't traced the ancestry of the spouses of my non-ancestors.  I usually send them a genealogy report with Notes for their ancestor back to the gateway ancestor.  And I ask them to revise or correct or add information about their family, and ask if I can add their information to my family tree database.

My Scribd home page tells me that there have been over 2,700 Views of my reports - my guess is that almost all of them came from a name search in a search engine.

3)  What other ways of preserving genealogy research have you used so that it can be found by a search engine?

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/11/dear-randy-how-have-you-saved-your.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 241: 1733 Marriage Record of Thomas Dill and Mehitable Brown

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the marriage record of Thomas Dill and Mehitable Brown on 17 July 1733  in the records of Eastham, Barnstable County, Massachusetts.  


The record snippet:


The transcription of the record is:

July 17:1733 then Thomas Dill & Mehitable Brown were married by Mr Isaiah Lues.

The source citation for this record is:

"Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1627-2001," digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org : accessed 1 November 2014), Barnstable > Eastham-Orleans > Births, Marriages, Deaths, 1701-1796 > image 64 of 126, page 109 (penned), Thomas Dill and Mehitable Brown marriage entry.

Thomas Dill (1708-1761) and Mehitable Brown (1714-1758) are my 5th great-grandparents.  Their son, Thomas Dill (1755-1830) married Hannah Horton (1761-1797) in 1782.


Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver