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Saturday, November 25, 2017

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Drive Down Memory Lane: Family Cars

It's Saturday Night - 
time for more Genealogy Fun! 


Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:


1)  Drive down Memory Lane - what were your family cars - from childhood to now, year, model, color, features.  Can you remember?

2)  Share your memories with us in your own blog post, in a Facebook post or a comment on this post.  Please comment on this post if you write somewhere else.

Here's mine:

*  The first car I recall from my childhood was a Hudson that my grandparents had.  It had running boards.  

*  The first car I recall my father driving (my mother never drove)  was a 1954 Mercury, I think it was light blue or green.  We took several vacations up and down California in that car.  Windows open, boys in the back seat, counting cars and finding different state license plates. 

*  In 1958, my father bought a pink Cadillac.  I have no reason for it, other than he got a good deal on it.  This car served us well going to and from the baseball fields in Balboa Park.  My dad drove it to Pacific Beach for work several times a week.

*  In the early 1970s, he bought a new Cadillac, and it was that car that was damaged when the cement truck went through the garage on Point Loma.  See (Not So) Wordless Wednesday - Post 234: Cement Truck Bashes House.

*  I didn't get my driver's license until 1966.  My first car was a used white 1962 Chevrolet Impala that my father bought for me.  I dinged it immediately trying to get out of my parking space at the apartment!  I hate poles or posts that mark spaces.

*  In 1968, after I started working at Rohr, I got a used gold two-door 1966 Ford Thunderbird.  I had my only accident in that car when a guy ran a stop sign right in front of me and I T-boned him after Christmas 1969.  Got it fixed.


*  When I married Linda in 1970, she had a light blue two-door 1968 Ford Mustang which she bought new in 1968.  She drove that to work, and I drove the T-bird to work.



*  When baby Lori came along in 1974, we needed a four door car so we could access the baby in the car seat.  We traded in the T-bird for a new orange 1974 Datsun 510.  It got better gas mileage!  Linda drove the Datsun with the kids, I drove the Mustang to work, and we took the Datsun whenever we went somewhere as a family with two little ones.

*  By 1983, the Mustang was failing, so we sold it to the neighbor's family, and bought a new light-blue 1983 Oldsmobile Delta 88, which was bigger and more comfortable for all of us.  We took several long family vacations in this car.

*  By 1986, the Datsun was failing, so we traded it in for a new gold 1987 Dodge Caravan van.  The girls were teenagers and had softball games and Girl Scout activities, and we traveled to away games often.  Linda drove the Caravan and I drove the Olds.  We took the Caravan on family vacations.

*  In 1990, Lori turned 16, got her license on her birthday, and we bought a used red 1988 Nissan Sentra for her.  She used that all through college until she married.

*  In 1992, Tami turned 16, got her license on her birthday, and we bought a used champagne-colored 1990 Toyota Tercel for her.  She used that all through college and her early married life.

*  The 1983 Oldsmobile died in 1998, and was donated to a high school auto shop.  We bought a used silver 1996 Lincoln Continental for the family car.  The girls were gone by now and we wanted comfort.  

*  Later in 1998, the Caravan broke down, so we sold it to a guy at the repair shop.  We bought a used green 1997 Mercury Sable for Linda to drive.  

*  The 1996 Lincoln broke down in 2005, so we gave it to a charity and got a tax deduction.  We bought a new silver 2005 Lincoln Town Car, which we still have.  It sits in our driveway except for weekly trips to church.  It gets 20 MPG on the highway and 10 MPG on city streets, and has mechanical problems.

*  The 1997 Mercury couldn't be smogged in 2015, so we traded it in for a new silver 2015 Nissan Altima, which is our main car at present.  We really need only one car, since Linda can't drive now, but having two is handy in case visitors need a car to drive.  It gets 37 MPG on the highway, so is much more fuel efficient than the Lincoln or Sable.  The problem now is that Tami's three kids are bigger and barely fit in the back seat!

So, between us, Linda and I have bought and run ten cars over a 50 year period.

As you can tell, we tend to keep our cars until they break down and then move up in class (and price).  The Altima is the first time we've bought a car cheaper than the one we had before.  


Note:  I found all of these images on Google Images.  I don't have photos of all of our cars.


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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Surname Saturday -- LNU (Katherine who married Thomas Read, England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2053 who is Katherine LNU (1628-1692). 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through one generation in this LNU family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

64. Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816)
65. Martha Whitney (1764-1832)

128.  Norman Seaver (1734-1787)
129.  Sarah Read (1736-1809)

256. Robert Seaver (1702-1752)

257.  Eunice Rayment (1707-1772)

512.  Joseph Seaver (1672-1754)
513.  Mary Read (1680-????)


1026.  Thomas Read (1653-1733)
1027.  Mary Goodrich (1650-1724)

2052.  Thomas Read, born before 19 October 1627 in Colchester, Essex, England; died 13 September 1701 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 4104. Thomas Read and 4105. Rachel LNU.  He married before 1653 in probably Massachusetts, United States.
2053.  Katherine LNU, born about 1628 in England; died 26 September 1677 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Child of Thomas Read and Katherine LNU is:

*  Thomas Read, born about 1653 in probably Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died about 1733 in probably Oxford, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States; married Mary Goodrich 30 May 1677 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  

The ancestry of Katherine (--?--) Read is unknown.  The FamilySearch Family Tree (and probably some Ancestry trees) says that she was Katherine Edwards (1627-1677) of Colchester, Essex.  I have not seen evidence of this.


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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, November 24, 2017

Genealogy News Bytes - 24 November 2017


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


*  Hidden from the Nazis, Thousands of Lost Jewish Records are Discovered in a Basement

*  Family is ‘Thankful’ for Treasure Returned to Them 73 Years Later

*  The ancestry-fueled trip of a lifetime in London

2)  Record Databases:

 New War of 1812 Pension Records are Here


*  The Genealogist adds 1910 Lloyd George Domesday Survey

*  Findmypast Announces Plans to Publish Cincinnati & Chicago Sacramental Registers Online For the First Time

*  New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 24 November 2017

3)  Genealogy Education:


 GeneaWebinars Calendar

* Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 29 November, 11 a.m. PST:  Understanding Alabama, by Rorey Cathcart

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Thursday, 30 November, 11 a.m. PST: Find Your Immigrant Ancestors AND their Relatives in the New York Passenger Arrival Records, by Mike Mansfield

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Research in Federal Records: Some Assembly Required, by Malissa Ruffner

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar: Creating Family History Ebooks: Your Blueprint for Success, by Lisa Alzo

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube Channel:  Stand and Deliver: What if your ancestor was a criminal, by James Tanner

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube Channel: Back Up Your Data Now or Cry, by James Tanner

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube Channel:  Do you have Genealogy Retirement Plans?

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, November 24,  2017


*  FREE E-Book: DNA Buying Guide – Holiday 2017

 FREE E-Book: 23 Best Tips for DNA Testing and Family History

*  Free GenealogyBank eBook:  Mayflower Families Across 12 Generations:Finding the Stories of Your Family in Newspapers

*  RootsTech 2018 Registration Giveaway Contests

5)  Neat Stuff:

*  They went on Ancestry.com to learn about their heritage, but they got much more

*  Long-lost sisters reunited

Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 21 November 2017?


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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 24 November 2017

I received this information from Findmypast today:

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New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday



There are over 2.7 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;


Over 94,000 records covering parishes throughout the Catholic Diocese of Westminster have been added to our collection of English Roman Catholic Parish Baptisms. Each record will include both a transcript and an image of the original document. The amount of information in each transcript may vary depending on the age of the original record, its legibility, and the amount of detail recorded by the parish priest at the time of the event. Images may provide additional information about your ancestor such as the names of their godparents, the minister who performed the baptism, and the parent's residence. Some registers will even include notes about the individual's marriage.


Over 13,000 additional Westminster records have been added to England Roman Catholic Parish Marriages. Every result will display the original sacramental register and a transcript of the vital details which may vary depending the age and condition of the register itself. Most transcripts will list the couple's full names, role, date of marriage, marriage location and father's names. Images may reveal additional details about your ancestor's wedding day such as the name of their witnesses or the priest who performed the service.


Over 9,000 Westminster records have also been added to our collection of English Roman Catholic Burials. Transcripts will reveal when and where your ancestor was laid to rest, the year in which they were born and the year of their death. Images may provide additional information such as their parents' names or details relating to their burial and plot.


Did your ancestor receive confirmation? Were they a benefactor of the parish? Explore more than 169,000 new additions to our collection of Roman Catholic anniversary books, confirmation lists, congregational lists, lists of benefactors and converts, parish diaries, and more to discover your ancestor's relationship with their local Catholic parish.


Over 94,000 new additions have also been added to the England Roman Catholic Registers Browse search. The entire collection now contains 756 volumes from the Birmingham and Westminster Archdiocesan Archives spanning the years 1657 to 1907. The browse function allows you to browse through entire registers of baptisms, marriages, burials and congregational records (including anniversary books, confirmation lists, parish diaries, and more) in their entirety.


Browse through more than 112, 000 Welsh probate abstracts from the following Church in Wales dioceses: Bangor, Hawarden, Llandaff, St. Asaph's, and St. David's. Prior to 1858, all wills were proved in the Anglican Ecclesiastical courts. Within the probate abstracts, you may find the testator's name and residence along with the date of the will and probate. Others may include the names and relationships of other family members, plus the name of the executor. The images were supplied by FamilySearch.


Browse through this collection of more than 123,000 court, land, military, naturalizations, probate, school, and vital records from Comanche County in Texas. The details found in each record will vary depending on the type of event. The images have been provided by FamilySearch. A full list of the vast variety of documents available within this collection can be found at the bottom of the search page.


Browse through 31 volumes of indexes to naturalization petitions and declarations of intentions from Texas. Containing over 91,000 records, these indexes will provide you with your ancestor's name, residence, birth date, admission date, certificate date, and court. The declarations of intentions will provide the date, court, and individual's name and residence, as well as additional details such as birth place, where and when the person arrived in America, a physical description, and names of spouse and children. The images were supplied by FamilySearch. A full list of the volumes is available at the bottom of the search page.


Browse through more than 53,000 school census records from Matagorda County in Texas. The records are arranged by surname and use racial terms that were contemporary at the time they were created. The school records are segregated between white and 'colored' students. Each record will provide the student's name, birth date, sex, parents' names, and residence. In cases where siblings are in the same school, all names are recorded on one record.


Browse through more than 44,000 civil court minutes and case files from Nolan County, Texas, spanning the years from 1881 to 1938.


Browse through images of records from Bexar County, Texas, including documents relating to the Odd Fellows Cemetery, Old City Cemetery, and San Jose Burial Park. This collection contains over 38,000 records.


Browse through more than 364,000 county records, including civil case records and certificates of naturalisations, from Eastland County, Texas, spanning the years from 1868 to 1949.


Over 1.5 million new articles and ten brand new titles have been added to our collection of historical British Newspaper. New additions titles now to search include;

  •         Todmorden Advertiser and Hebden Bridge Newsletter
  •         Melton Mowbray Mercury and Oakham and Uppingham News
  •         Surrey Gazette
  •         Leominster News and North West Herefordshire & Radnorshire Advertiser
  •         Isle of Wight Times
  •         Cambrian News
  •         Ross Gazette
  •         Bridgwater Mercury
  •         Rhyl Journal
  •         Epworth Bells, Crowle and Isle of Axholme Messenger

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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 202: #281 Mary (Pierce) Dill (1682-1713) of Medford, Massachusetts

 Mary (Pierce) Dill (1682-1713) is #281 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married #280 Thomas Dill (1682-1718)  in 1706 in Woburn, Massachusetts.


I am descended through:

*  their son, #140 Thomas Dill (1708-1761) who married #71  Mehitable Brown (1714-1758) in 1733.
*  their son, #70 Thomas Dill (1755-1836), who married Hannah Horton (1761-1797) in 1782. 
*  their daughter, #35 Elizabeth Horton Dill (1791-1869), who married  #34 Alpheus B. Smith (1802-1840) in 1826.
*  their daughter #17 Lucretia Townsend Smith (1828-1884)who married  #16 Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)  in 1851.
*  their son #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) who married #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) who married #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
    
*  Name:                      Mary Pierce[1–2]    

*  Sex:                         Female    

*  Father:                    Nathaniel Pierce (1655-1692)    
*  Mother:                  Elizabeth Pierce (1646-    )  

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Birth:                     31 July 1682, Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1]    
*  Death:                    before May 1713 (before about age 31), Medford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Spouse 1:                 Thomas Dill (1682-1718)
*  Marriage 1:             17 January 1705/6 (age 23), Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[2]

*  Child 1:                  Mary Dill (1706-    )
*  Child 2:                 Thomas Dill (1708-1761)
*  Child 3:                 Elizabeth Dill (1712-1714)  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):    


Mary Pierce was born 31 July 1682 in Woburn, Massachusetts[1], the first child of Nathaniel Pierce and his second wife, Elizabeth (Pierce) (Whittemore) Foster, who had four children before marrying Nathaniel Pierce.  Mary's father died in 1692 in Woburn, and there is no record of her mother marrying again.  

She married Thomas Dill of Cambridge Farms, Massachusetts on 17 January 1705/6 in Woburn[2].  He was the son of Peter and Thanks (Shepard) Dill.   They resided in Medford, Massachusetts, and had three children registered in the Medford town records between 1708 and 1712.

Mary (Pierce) Dill died after her daughter, Elizabeth, was born on 2 January 1712 and before 11 May 1713 when Thomas Dill married his second wife, Mary Cheney, in Cambridge, Massachusetts.

There is no death or burial record available for Mary (Pierce) Dill in Woburn, Cambridge, Medford or Littleton where Thomas Dill resided after Mary's death.
 
5)  SOURCES
 
1. Edward F. Johnson,  Woburn Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths [5 Volumes], (Woburn, Mass.: The News Print, 1893), Births, page 194, Martha Pierce entry, 1682, "daughter of Nathaniel."
2. Edward F. Johnson, Woburn Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths [5 Volumes], Marriages, page 77, Thomas Dill and Mary Pierce entry, 1706, "in Woburn."

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NOTE:  Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post 
 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2017 to 208 Ancestors in 208 Weeks


Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, November 23, 2017

Seavers in the News -- True W. Seaver Dies in 1884

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the New York Herald  newspaper dated Tuesday, 15 January 1884:




The transcription of this record is:

"SEAVER. -- On Sunday, the 13th inst., of apoplexy,
TRUE W. SEAVER, in the 70th year of his age.
Funeral will take place from the residence of his
son, T. Mortimer Seaver, No. 115 West 125th st., on
Tuesday, January 15, at one o'clock P.M."

The source citation for this record is:

"DIED," death notices, New York Herald, Tuesday, 15 January 1884, page 9, column 2, True W. Seaver death notice;   GenealogyBank  (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 23 November 2017), Newspaper Archives collection.

I found this searching for his son True Mortimer Seaver and was rewarded by finding the death notice of Mortimer's father, True Worthy Seaver  

True Worthy Seavey was born in about 1814 in Chester, New Hampshire, the son of Elliott and Sarah (Payne() Seavey.  By the time of his marriage in 1837 to Mary Ann Humphrey (1816-1883) in Boston, Massachusetts, he was using the surname Seaver, and used it through the rest of his life.  True and Mary Ann (Humphrey) Seaver had four children born in Boston between 1839 and 1845, but none of the births were recorded.  

I don't think that I am related to True Worthy Seavey/Seaver.


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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

1714 Marriage Record of Samuel Horton and Hannah Atwood in Eastham, Mass. --- Post 391 of Treasure Chest Thursday

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1714 marriage record of Samuel Horton and Hannah Atwood in Eastham, Massachusetts:



The marriage record is on the right-hand page, the tsecond record down:


The transcription of the marriage record is:

"Samuel Horton & Hannah Atwood Jan 28^th 1713/14"

The source citation for this record is:

"Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1620-1998," database with digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 22 November 2017), Barnstable County, Orleans > Orleans and Eastham Records,  page 339 (image 178 of 185), Samuel Horton and Hannah Atwood marriage entry, 1714.

Samuel Horton (1686-1778) was the son of John Horton (1647-1710) and Hannah --?-- (1650-1690) of Eastham, Massachusetts.  Hannah Atwood (1686-1771) was the daughter of Stephen Atwood (1653-1722) and Apphia Bangs (1651-1722) of Eastham, Massachusetts.  Samuel Horton and Hannah Atwood had 8 children between 1715 and 1731, and all were recorded in the Eastham town records.

Samuel and Hannah (Atwood) Horton are my 6th great-grandparents, through their son Narhaniel Horton (1721-1771) who married Eunice Snow (1722-1816) in 1742 in Eastham, Massachusetts.

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

I Am Thankful for...


--- for my Lord and Savior, Jesus Christ.

--- for my wonderful loving wife, Angel Linda, who makes every day, and every meal, special.

--- for my two beautiful and smart daughters, and Tami's husband, who work so hard to do so well in order to live securely and happily.

--- for my five precious grandchildren, so innocent and with so much potential, and so much fun to be with.

--- for my enthusiastic father, who provided a large New England ancestry to research, and passed on an undying love for the games of baseball and football.

--- for my loving mother, so patient, supportive and kind, who saved so much family history and whose ancestry provides such fascinating research challenges.

--- for my brothers, their wives and children, who are interested in the family history and remember more than I do about our growing up years.

--- for my grandparents and earlier ancestors, who worked hard, played by the rules, raised healthy families, and provided a firm foundation for their descendants.

--- for my aunts, uncles and cousins, who opened their homes and their hearts and shared their memories.

--- for the brave passengers on the Mayflower and other early ships who colonized New England, and instilled a republican form of government based on personal freedom and responsibility.

--- for the immigrants that populated our country, diversified our culture, worked hard to succeed, and are woven into the country's fabric.

--- for the courageous citizens who revolted to secure our freedoms, and created the institutions that are the foundations of the USA.

--- for the soldiers, sailors, marines and pilots, of every historical time, who have given their lives, defended our country, and kept us safe and free.

--- for the entire Constitution and Bill of Rights - especially the freedoms of speech, religion and assembly. I am awestruck that the Founders wrote such a magnificent set of documents that have stood the test of time.

--- for educational opportunities, whereby every and any person in this country can be the best that they can be, but they have to really make an effort.

--- for the free market and free enterprise economic system that encourages and rewards work and innovation, and has allowed me and my family to enjoy the fruits of our labor.

--- for the marvels of science and engineering, that drive our health, transportation, communication and entertainment industries.

--- for the wonders of nature that beautify our world, inspire us and occasionally overwhelm us.

--- for my genealogy society colleagues, genea-bloggers, blog readers, Facebook friends and Google+ circle members who challenge, educate, encourage and appreciate me.

--- for Ancestry.com, Fold3.com, FamilySearch.org, GenealogyBank, Geni,  MyHeritage, FindMyPast, AmericanAncestors, Find A Grave, and other genealogy websites that provide online databases and records to explore into the wee hours of the night.

--- for genealogy software that organizes our family structures and provides incredible reports and charts to share with our families.

--- for repositories that collect, preserve and provide papers, records, photographs, books, manuscripts and artifacts to expand our research.

--- for genealogy conferences, societies, magazines, books, newsletters, webinars, hangouts, and social media that inform and educate us.

This year, I am really thankful for good health and the joys of going out to dinner with my wife on Thanksgiving (so she doesn't drop another frozen turkey on her toes and I have to cook it.)

What are you thankful for on this 155th Thanksgiving holiday?


Note:  Edited and reposted every year since 2011!  The statements are enduring.


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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/11/i-am-thankful-for.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.