Tuesday, January 22, 2008

Best of the Genea-Blogs - January 13-19, 2008

Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week.My criteria are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy, address current genealogy issues, are funny or are poignant.

I don't list posts destined for the Carnival of Genealogy, or my own posts (hopefully, others will do that!).

* "Snapshots of the world back in 1908" by Lisa on the 100 Years in America blog. Lisa provides a "Carnival" post of responses to her challenge. There are many excellent posts on this list! Well done, Lisa.

* "Excited!" by Jasia on the Creative Gene blog. Jasia won Blaine Bettinger's contest and received a free DNA test from DNA Heritage. Read her reaction to winning, and then her selection of an mtDNA test in her post "My Own mtDNA vs. Y-DNA Test Analysis." Congratulations, Jasia.

* "Top Ten Worst Ways to Begin a Family History" by Chris Dunham on The Genealogue blog. Chris is back with a classic ... our humor fix is in here!

* "The Small World of the 17th Century" by Carolyn L. Barkley on the GenealogyandFamilyHistory.com Blog. This is the first post on the new blog at the book publisher, Genealogical.com. Carolyn connects some dots about the early North American settlement.

* "Queues: Forming Lines" by Terry Thornton on the Hill Country of Monroe County, Mississippi blog. Terry finds the most interesting things to write about... I was going to link to his Winter post, but then he wrote about Elvis and Outhouses so now which one do I choose?

* "Family Secrets: The Slave Trade in Early America" by Tim Agazio on the Genealogy Reviews Online blog. Tim highlights a fascinating article about New England people enmeshed in the slave trade. I have several families that owned slaves, so this hits close to home for me.

* "How Good Are the Family Search Indexing Indexes?" on the Legacy News blog. This gives many of us hope that the FSI indexers have done a better job than others did on the 1900 census.

* "They Don't Make Them Like This Anymore" by Chery Kinnick on the Nordic Blue blog. Chery shows us her great-grandparents marriage license and dissects it a bit.

* "Are You Checking Manuscript Collections?" by Michael John Neill on the Rootdig.com blog. Michael makes excellent points here and provides some good
resources.

* "Organizing and Starting Anew" by Drew Smith on the Rootsmithing: Genealogy, Methodology and Technology blog. Drew has renamed his blog and will, hopefully blog more about genealogy, methodology and technology - I can hardly wait. He shows his desk area in this post - I can hardly wait to see the "other side" of his office!

* "49 Genealogy Uses for a Flutaphone on Genealogy Parade" by Bill West on the West in New England blog. Bill is up to #29 on his flutaphone usage list ... and then challenges geneabloggers to tell about their float in the Genealogy Parade. Excellent thought... I hope he pulls them all together in a post sometime so we can read all of them.

* "1808: Where was your family 200 years ago?" by Donna Pointkouski on the What's Past is Prologue blog. Donna challenges geneabloggers to post about 200 years ago - this will be more challenging for many of us!

Please go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add the blogger to your Favorites, Bloglines, reader, feed or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - we all appreciate feedback on what we write.

Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me!

4 comments:

Terry Thornton said...

Thank you Randy for the "three-fer!" I know about BoGo [buy one and get one] but I've never had a three link lineup! LOL!
A Seaver blogavalanche in the making!
THANKS!
Terry

Bill West said...

Randy,
Thanks for the mention!
So....
What's on your float?
*grin*

TheGeneticGenealogist said...

Thank you for doing these round-ups, I ALWAYS find interesting posts that I never would have seen!

Chery said...

Hey, Randy - thanks for the mention! I think Terry Thornton has out-done me in the poignant marriage certificate stories, however!