Friday, April 16, 2021

Genealogy News and Education Bytes -- Friday, 16 April 2021

Welcome to Genealogy News and Education Bytes, posted on Tuesday afternoon and Friday afternoon, where we try to highlight the most important genealogy and family history news and education items that came across our desktop since the last issue.    


1)  News Articles:








2)  New or Updated Record Collections:



3)  Genealogy Education -- Conferences and Institutes



*  We Are Open! The 51st Jamboree Conference! (4-5 and 11-12 June 2021)



4)  Genealogy Education - Seminars, Webinars and Online Classes (times are US Pacific):




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Friday, 16 April, 11 a.m.: 

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 20 April, 5 p.m.:  Turning Raw Information into Evidence: Tips for Drawing and Explaining Conclusions, by J.H. (Jay) Fonkert

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 21 April, 11 a.m.:  3 Ways to Advance Your Research with Correlation, by Shannon Green

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  The new and improved Legacy Family Tree Webinars website, by Daniel Horowitz and Geoff Rasmussen

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:   Jewish Genealogy with JewishGen.org, by Deborah J. Kroopkin

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:   An African Canadian Family History Mystery, by Mags Gaulden

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:   What is Genetic Distance? by Diahan Southard

* Archived Family Tree Webinars:    The 24 Hour Genealogy Webinar Marathon 

5)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts:


6)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):





*  Family Connections Experiment:  Healing Through Connecting with Our Ancestors



7)  Did you miss the last post in this series -  Genealogy News and Education Bytes - 13 April 2021?

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Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Rolls of Honour, Parish Records, and Newspapers This Findmypast Friday

   I received this from Findmypast this morning:

============================================

FINDMYPAST FRIDAY

Brand new rolls of honour, parish records and more

Discover remarkable Anzac stories and Kent family milestones this Findmypast Friday. Here's what's new this week.

Australia, Military Commemorative Rolls & Rolls of Honour

Ahead of Anzac Day, we’ve compiled a major new resource for exploring the lives of Australia's military heroes.



A striking photo included in the records of Captain Alfred John Shout. Gallipoli’s most decorated soldier, Shout was awarded a Victoria Cross and Military Cross.

By combining a variety of Australian commemorative and honour rolls into one simple search, this rich collection makes it easier to discover the details of your ancestors’ service and death across all of the major conflicts of Australian history.

Kent parish records

Unlock family milestones with over 37,000 additional records from six Kent parishes. These records are essential for growing the Kent branches of your family tree.

The parishes covered in this latest tranche of new baptism, marriage and burial records are:
  • Halling, St John the Baptist
  • Hoo St Werburgh
  • Horton Kirby, St Mary
  • Luddesdown, Leywood School
  • Luddesdown, SS Peter & Paul
  • Milton-next-Gravesend, Christchurch
Review the parish list to see exact timeframes covered and the other churches featured in this growing resource.

Newspapers

We’ve added nine new papers and updated a raft of other publications, 35 to be precise. Brand new this week are:
While we've been even busier than usual, expanding the coverage in these 35 newspapers:
==============================================

Disclosure: I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador. This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post. Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below. Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 378: #589 Hannah (Wheeler) Fletcher (1647-1697) of Concord and Chelmsford, Massachusetts

Hannah Wheeler (1649-1697)  is #589 on my Ahnentafel List, my 7th great-grandmother, who married #588 Samuel Fletcher (1652-1723) on 5 July 1673 (?) in Chelmsford, Middlesex County,  Massachusetts.

I am descended through:

*  their son #294 Samuel Fletcher (1684-1749) who married #295 Hannah --?-- (1688-1759) in 1712. 
*  their daughter #147 Elizabeth Fletcher (1720-1761) who married #146 Jonathan Keyes (1722-1781)  in 1746.
*  their daughter #73 Elizabeth Keyes (1759-1793) who married #72 Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1829) in 1777.
*  their son #36 Zachariah Hildreth (1783-1857) who married  #37 Hannah Sawtell (1789-1857)  in 1810.
*  their son #18 Edward Hildreth (1831-1899) who married #19 Sophia Newton (1834-1923) in 1852.
*  their daughter #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) who married  #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) who married #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)  in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

=====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 
    
 Name:                     Hannah Wheeler[1]    
*  Alternate Name:     Hannah Whealer[6]    
*  Alternate Name:     Hannah Fletcher[2,4]    
*  Alternate Name:     Hanah Flatcher[3]    
*  Alternate Name:     Hannah Wheeler Fletcher[5]  

*  Sex:                        Female    

*  Father:                   George Wheeler (1605-1687)    
*  Mother:                  Katherine Pin (1611-1684)  
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 
*  Birth:                     about 1647, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1]    

*  Distribution:         2 July 1697 (about age 50), father's will proved; Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[2]    

*  Death:                  11 December 1697 (about age 50), Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1,3–5]    
*  Burial:                  after 11 December 1697 (after about age 50), Forefathers Burial Ground, Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[5]  

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 
*  Spouse 1:           Samuel Fletcher (1647-1723)
*  Marriage 1:        5 July 1673 (?) (about age 25) Chelmsford, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1,6]     
*  Child 1:             William Fletcher (1673-1753)
*  Child 2:             Hannah Fletcher (1676-1759)
*  Child 3:             Elizabeth Fletcher (1679-1715)
*  Child 4:             Samuel Fletcher (1683-1683)
*  Child 5:             Samuel Fletcher (1684-1749)
*  Child 6:             Mary Fletcher (1686-1768)
*  Child 7:             Lydia Fletcher (1689-1766)
*  Child 8:             Susanna Fletcher (1692-1717)
*  Child 9:             Isaac Fletcher (1694-1772)
*  Child 10:           Sarah Fletcher (1696- )

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):  

The Wheeler families of Cranfield in Bedfordshire during the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries were numerous, and the relationships between them are difficult to sort out without complete parish registers.  One of the best resources for the George Wheeler family is:

Myrtelle Wheeler Molyneaux, The Wheeler Family of Cranfield, England and Concord, Massachusetts and Some Descendants of Sgt. Thomas Wheeler of Concord (Long Beach, Calif. : the author, 1992)[1].

Hannah Wheeler was born in about 1647 in Concord, Massachusetts, the 8th and last child of George and Katherine (Pin) Wheeler, who settled in Concord by 1638[1].

Hannah "Whealer" married Samuel Fletcher (1652-1723), son of William and Lydia (--?--) (Bates) Fletcher. on 5 July 1673 (?) in Chelmsford, Massachusetts 

Hannah Wheeler was born in about 1647 in Concord, Massachusetts, the 8th and last child of George and Katherine (Pin) Wheeler, who settled in Concord by 1638.

Hannah "Whealer" married Samuel Fletcher (1652-1723), son of William and Lydia (--?--) (Bates) Fletcher. on 5 July 1673 (?) in Chelmsford, Massachusetts[1,6].  The marriage record in the Chelsmford vital records book says:
""WHEALER, Hannah, d. George, of Concord, and Samuell Fletcher, s. William, July 5, 1[torn, 1673?]."
They had ten children between 1673 and 1696, all recorded in the Chelmsford vital records book:

* William Fletcher (1673-1753), married 1716 Maqry Foster (1686-1768).
*  Hannah Fletcher (1676-1759), married 1697 Ebenezer Wright (1663-1730).
*  Elizabeth Fletcher (1679-1715), married 1701 Benjamin Butterfield (1679-1715).
*  Samuel Fletcher (1683-1683).
*  Samuel Fletcher (1684-1749), married 1712 Hannah --?-- (1689-1759).
*  Mary Fletcher (1686-1768), married 1715 Jonathan Wheeler (1683-1739.
*  Lydia Fletcher (1689-1766), married 1711 Peletiah Adams (1682-1746).
*  Susanna Fletcher (1692-1717), married 1715 Joseph Chamberlain (1687-1755).
*  Isaac Fletcher (1694-1772), married 1716 Persis Shattuck (1695-1747).
*  Sarah Fletcher (1696-????).

Her father, George Wheeler (1606-1687) of Concord wrote his will on 28 January 1684/5, and it was proved on 2 July 1687 in Middlesex County Probate Court[2].  He bequeathed his estate to his children, including this:
"I give to my daughter Foxes children six pounds equall amongst them: I give to my four daughters Elizabeth Fletcher, Sarah Dudly, Ruth Hartwell & Hanah Fletcher the sume of fifteen pounds apiece in good & currant Countery pay to be paid to them in Concord currant price..."
Hannah (Wheeler) Fletcher died on 11 December 1697 in Chelmsford.  The death record in the town record book says:
"Hannah the wife of Samuel Fletcher Dyed the 11 of December 1697."
Hannah (Wheeler) Fletcher was buried in Forefather's Burial Ground in Chelsmford, Massachusetts.  There is no extant stone, but there is a Find A Grave memorial for her[5].
   
5)  SOURCES

1. Myrtelle Wheeler Molyneaux, The Wheeler Family of Cranfield, England and Concord, Massachusetts and Some Descendants of Sgt. Thomas Wheeler of Concord (Long Beach, Calif. : the author, 1992), page 219, Hannah Wheeler birth entry, abt. 1647 in Concord.

2. Suffolk County, Massachusetts, Probate case files, Volume: Middlesex Cases 00001-01999 Estate File #1580 (7 images), George Wheeler of Concord estate, 1687; "Suffolk County (Massachusetts) Probate Records, 1636-1899," digital images, New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2014, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org : accessed 21 March 2021); Digitized mages provided by FamilySearch.org from original records at Probate Registry, Cambridge, Mass.

3. Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Vital Records of Chelmsford, Massachusetts to the Year 1850 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1914), Deaths, page 389, Hanah Flatcher entry, 11 December 1697, wife of Samuell.

4. "Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (https://www.ancestry.com), "Chelmsford Town Land Records with Births, Marriages and Deaths," Page 346 (image 191 of 230), Hannah Fletcher death entry, 11 December 1697.

5. Find A Grave, indexed database and digital image,  (http://www.findagrave.com), Forefathers Burial Ground, Chelmsford, Mass., Hannah Wheeler Fletcher memorial #32751035.

6. Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Vital Records of Chelmsford, Massachusetts to the Year 1850, Marriages, page 231, and 344, Samuel Fletcher and Hannah Whealer entry, 5, July 1673(?).
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NOTE: In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog. I have extended this theme in 2021 for an eighth year to 416 Ancestors in 416 Weeks. The list of 52 Ancestors biographies from my great-grandparents to the 7th great-grandparents (in work) is in https://www.geneamusings.com/p/ancestor-biographies.html.

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2021/04/52-ancestors-week-378-589-hannah.html

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post. Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below. Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, April 15, 2021

Seavers in the News -- Oscar Seaver Dies in 1950 in Illinois

 It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from The [Crystal Lake, Ill.] Herald newspaper dated 12 October 1950:



The transcription of the article is:

"Oscar Seaver

"Funeral services for Oscar Seidel Seaver, 74, of Barrington, formerly of Lakewood, retired lawyer and former Army officer, were held Oct. 2 at St. Anne's church.  Burial was in All Saints cemetery at Des Plaines.  Military honors were accorded by Barrington American Legion post.

"Mr. Seaver died Thursday evening, Sept. 28, at his home at 226 West Lake street following a two years' illness.  He was born Oct. 31, 1875 at Cambridge, Mass., and was married to Agnes Pohlman in Chicago, on June 29, 1927.  The couple made their home at Evanston for a few years then moved to Crystal Lake where they lived until 13 years ago when they became residents of Barrington.

"Graduated from Harvard university in 1898, Mr. Seaver received his LLD degree from the University of New York in 1907 and was awarded his JD degree at the same school a year later.  He practiced law in New York from 1908 to 1911 when he established a practice in Chicago.  He was active in his profession until early 1949 when he became ill.

"He was a member of the Harvard, Yale, Princeton club of Chicago, the Harvard club  of Chicago, the University club of Evanston, The New York Bar Association as well as the Illinois and Chicago bar associations.  Mr. Seaver was a charter member of Barrington Hills Country club.

"During World War I, Mr. Seaver served with Company G, 327th Machine Gun Battalion, 8rth Infantry Division, as a captain, and while overseas was on the official staff for the prisoner of war trials.  In the Illinois National Guard he held the rank of captain and in 1929 organized the 330th Tank Company, now company G of Maywood.  Mr. Seaver was a major in the United States Army Reserve from 1919 to 1924 when he was promoted to the rank of lieutenant colonel.

"Mr. Seaver belonged to the Crystal Lake American Legion post and later transferred to the Barrington post.

"Mr. Seaver was the attorney for the Barrington Park Board during 1947 and 1948.  He formerly served at attorney for the Lakewood village board and during his residence in Evanston was an alderman of the first ward and headed various important committees active in the ward.

"Surviving in addition to his wife, are a son, Robert Cushing Seaver; a sister, Miss Margaret Seaver of Boston; two brothers, Dr. Edwin Peter Seaver of New Bedford, Mass., and Samuel Seaver of Markham, Ontario, Canada"

The source citation is:

"Oscar Seaver,The [Crystal Lake, Ill.] Herald newspaper, obituary, Thursday, 12 October1950, page 13, column 4, Oscar Seaver obituary;  Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 15 April 2021).

This obituary provides a name, an age, a death date and place, a birth date and place, a marriage date and place, and the names of his wife, child, and living siblings, plus a fairly full description of his education, legal career, military service, and associations. 

Oscar Seidel Seaver was born 21 October 1875 in Cambridge, Massachusetts, the son of Edwin Pliny and Margaret Wiley (Cushing) Seaver.  He died 28 September 1950 in Barrington, Illinois, Florida.  He married Agnes Cecelia Pohlmann (1896-1986) on 1 January 1926 in Dexter, New York.  They had one child:

* Robert Cushing Seaver (19128-????).

I am a 7th cousin three times removed to Oscar Seaver, with the common Seaver ancestor being robert Seaver (1608-1683), who settled in Roxbury, Massachusetts in 1634.

There are over 10,000 Seaver "stories" in my family tree - and this was one of them.   Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and sometimes a person has a long legal and military career. I am glad that I can honor Oscar Seidel Seaver today.  

You never know when a descendant or relative will find this blog post and learn something about their ancestors or relatives, or will provide more information about them to me.

                                  =============================================

Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Treasure Chest Thursday -- 1673 Marriage of Samuel Fletcher and Hannah Whealer in Chelmsford, Massachusetts

  It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1673 marriage entry for Samuel Fletcher and Hannah Whealer in the Chelmsford, Massachusetts town vital record book:
The marriage entry is the second from the bottom of the page:


The baptism record transcription for Samuel Fletcher is:

"WHEALER, Hannah, d. George, of Concord, and Samuell Fletcher, s. William, July 5, 1[torn, 1673?]."

  The source citation for this record is:

Town of Chelmsford, Massachusetts, Vital Records of Chelmsford, Massachusetts to the Year 1850 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1914), Marriages, page 344, Samuel Fletcher and Hannah Whealer marriage entry, 5, July 1673(?).

This is an entry in a transcribed and alphabetized vital record book for Chelmsford, Massachusetts, so it is a Derivative Source with Primary Information and Direct Evidence of the marriage of Samuel Fletcher and Hannah Whealr, and the names of their fathers.

Hannah Whealer (1649-1697) was born in concord, Massachusetts, the daughter of George and Katherine (Pin) Wheeler.  She married Samuel Fletcher (1652-1723) on 5 July 1673(?) in Chelmsford. Samuel Fletcher (1652-1723) was the son of William Fletcher and his second wife Lydia (--?--) Bates (1622-1704) of Chelmsford, Massachusetts.  Samuel and Hannah (Whealer) Fletcher had ten children, all born in Chelmsford.

Samuel and Hannah (Wheeler) Fletcher are my 7th great-grandparents, through their son Samuel Fletcher (1684-1749) who married Hannah --?-- (1688-1759) in about 1712 in Chelmsford, Massachusetts.

                                   ===========================================


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Wednesday, April 14, 2021

Revisiting My "To Be Filed" Folder - Some "Goodies"

 Part of our discussion on the Mondays With Myrt webinar this week was "what mistakes did you make early in your genealogy career?"  My major "mistake" was not citing many sources over the first 17 years of my "career."  

One of the panelists said that their mistake was not reviewing later all of the records they saved and collected early in their genealogy research.  That rang a loud bell in my mind, so yesterday I decided to look into my "To be Filed" computer directory.  Oh my.  There are so many goodies to be discovered again!  Massachusetts probates, Rhode Island probates, New Jersey probates, Massachusetts town records, portions of published books, FHL downloads, and "to be input into RM."    

One of the best "goodies" I found was a newspaper article about my 2nd great-grandfather, Devier J. Smith (1839-1894) that I captured as a PDF page in 2018.  Here it is:

The transcription is:

"For Sale or Trade

"I will sell or trade my property joining the C. II depot, via the north, for cash, or part horses and land.  The house is now used for boarding and eating houses, is bringing $50 per month.  Enquire at address.

                                                            "D.J. SMITH, Concordia, Kan."

The source citation is:

"For Sale or Trade," The Concordia [Kan.] Blade newspaper, 6 March 1885, page 2, D.J. Smith advertisement; online database and image, Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 18 Jul 2018).

Devier Smith moved his family from Concordia, Kansas up the Republican River to McCook, red Willow County, Nebraska in the spring of 1885, and it appears he was trying to sell the property he had near the train station in Concordia.  He was a horse trader and a livery man.

But wait, there's another newspaper article from Concordia - his obituary!


The transcription is:

"D.J. Smith Dead

"A Pioneer Concordian Passes Away At His Home in McCook, Nebr.

"From the McCook (Nebr.) Enterprise

"Died, at the St. Charles Hotel in this city, May 1, at 10:20 a.m. of dropsy of the heart.  Devier J. Smith, aged 51 years, 11 months and 24 days. 

Devier J. Smith became a resident of this city in the spring of 1885, and had been engaged in the livery business from that date until the time of his death.  Until last Thursday the deceased had enjoyed very good health, and was taken suddenly ill on that day and continued to grow worse until Tuesday morning when the messenger came.  On Wednesday previous to his death he drove into the country and was caught in a rain, which precipitated his last illness.

The members of his family who survive him are his wife, now with their daughter, Mrs. Della A. Carringer, at San Diego, Cal., a son, D.D. Smith, of this city, who arrived here a week ago last Sunday from Denver, and a daughter, Mrs. Matie Chenery, now at Lincoln.  The deceased was a member of the A.O.U.W., which order took charge of the funeral, which took place yesterday at 2:30 p.m. from the M.E. church.

"[Mrs. Matie Chenery has nearly recovered -- EDITOR BLADE]."

The source citation for this obituary is:

"D.J. Smith Dead," The Concordia [Kan.] Blade newspaper, Friday, 11 May 1894, page 3, D.J. Smith obituary; online database and image, Newspapers.com (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 18 Jul 2018).

The Concordia Blade received this information, apparently, from daughter Matie Chenery, but it was published in the McCook [Nebr.] Enterprise newspaper and the Concordia newspaper probably modified the headlines.

I have another obituary with much of the same information from the McCook [Nebr.] Times-Democrat newspaper.  

I have a lot of work to do to move these files into my family files, add events and sources to the persons in RootsMagic, and decide which items to transcribe in the Amanuensis Monday posts.  

                                  =============================================

Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Grandpa And Randy in 1945 -- Post 664 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

 I can't help it, I can't do a wordless post! This is one of my favorite colorized photographs:

This photograph is from about 1945, and that is me (about age 2) happily riding piggyback on my grandfather, Lyle Lawrence Carringer (1891-1976).  I imagine that playing with me was one of the most fun things he did during World War II, since I was the only grandchild at the time.  I  know I loved all the attention from my grandparents since my father was in the U.S. Navy and my mother was teaching school.  My grandmother was my caregiver those first two years and surely told my grandfather to play with me while she prepared dinner.  

This photograph was originally black-and-white and I colorized it and enhanced using the MyHeritage InColor photo tools.  

                                      =============================================

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post. Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below. Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com

Tuesday, April 13, 2021

Genealogy News and Education Bytes -- Tuesday, 13 April 2021

 Welcome to Genealogy News and Education Bytes, posted on Tuesday afternoon and Friday afternoon, where we try to highlight the most important genealogy and family history news and education items that came across our desktop since the last issue.    


1)  News Articles:



2)  New or Updated Record Collections:



3)  Genealogy Education -- Conferences and Institutes



*  We Are Open! The 51st Jamboree Conference! (4-5 and 11-12 June 2021)



4)  Genealogy Education - Seminars, Webinars and Online Classes (times are US Pacific):




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 13 April, 11 a.m.:  The new and improved Legacy Family Tree Webinars website, by Daniel Horowitz and Geoff Rasmussen

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 14 April, 5 p.m.: Jewish Genealogy with JewishGen.org, by Deborah J. Kroopkin

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Friday, 16 April, 11 a.m.: An African Canadian Family History Mystery, by Mags Gaulden

* Archived Family Tree Webinars:    The 24 Hour Genealogy Webinar Marathon 

5)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts:


6)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):

*  BYU Family History Library:  Fun, Free Family Tree Charts - Kathryn Grant


*  Your DNA Guide:  Organize Your DNA Matches into Genetic Networks

7)  Did you miss the last post in this series -  Genealogy News and Education Bytes - 9 April 2021?

==============================================


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.