Saturday, June 2, 2018

Randy at Jamboree 2018 - Day Three Photos

I took more photographs today on my perambulations around the Conference Center at the SCGS Genealogy Jamboree 2018 conference, but not too many.  Frankly, I forget to do this because I get involved in conversations, but I did take these:

1)  I sat with SDGS colleagues and geneabloggers Debby Warner Anderson and Diane Gould Hall at lunch today:



2)  Janet Hovorka's FamilyChartMasters exhibit was popular - Janet's in green helping a customer:


3)  The FamilySearch exhibit was open sided and had lots of customers during the break and lunch times:


4)  I caught CVGS colleague Virginia Taylor talking to Maureen Taylor (no relation I think!) at Maureen's exhibit:


5)  This is Jennifer Cree, Gena Philibert-Ortega and Rick Cree at the Moorshead Publishing exhibit:


6)  Amanda and Mike were at the Geni.com exhibit all weekend:


7)  I had fun talking to Jeannette (??)  who had the only exhibit selling genealogy-related t-shirts and jewelry and other hand-made items:


More photos from Day Three in another post.


=============================================


The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/06/randy-at-jamboree-2018-day-three-photos.html

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 27 May to 2 June 2018

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at   FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 2 June 2018, there were 2,322 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 6 from last week):


The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Added

*  Idaho, Jerome County Historical Society, Minidoka Japanese Relocation Center Mixed Vital Records, 1942-1945     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2821288); 385 indexed records with 385 record images, ADDED 31 May 2018

*  Arkansas, Sevier County, Death Records, 1914-1923       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2630407); 584 indexed records with 584 record images, ADDED 31 May 2018

*  Ohio, Washington County Newspaper Obituaries, 1884-2013 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2358414); 693,529 indexed records with 693,529 record images, ADDED 31 May 2018

*  Kansas, Cemetery Abstracts      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2568639); 110,219 indexed records with 110,219 record images, ADDED 31 May 2018

*  New Jersey Naturalization Records, 1796-1991    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2649169); 11,941 indexed records with 11,941 record images, ADDED 29 May 2018

*  Australia, Victoria, Tombstone Transcriptions from Various Cemeteries, 1850-1988        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2710652); 33,802 indexed records with 33,802 record images, ADDED 31 May 2018

--- Collections Updated ---

*  Honduras, Civil Registration, 1841-1968 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2135627); 474,297 indexed records with 337,976 record images (was 468,853 records with 337,976 images), Updated 29 May 2018

*  New York, Southern District, U.S District Court Naturalization Records, 1824-1946       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2060123); 893,360 indexed records with 2,187,206 record images (was 121,276 records with 2,187,206 images), Updated 31 May 2018

*  Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2016       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2016195); 8,068,939 indexed records with 5,387,756 record images (was 8,068,939 records with 5,387,756 images), Updated 2 Jun 2018

*  BillionGraves Index     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2026973); 24,838,644 indexed records with 24,838,644 record images (was 24,217,598 records with 24,217,598 images), Updated 31 May 2018

*  Portugal, Porto, Catholic Church Records, 1535-1949     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1913408); 264,238 indexed records with 1,207,157 record images (was 150,026 records with 1,207,157 images), Updated 29 May 2018

*  Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1430936); 4,449,990 indexed records with 3,505,112 record images (was 4,447,793 records with 3,505,112 images), Updated 29 May 2018

*  Switzerland, Fribourg, Census, 1880     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2142779); 10,443 indexed records with 48,947 record images (was 10,443 records with 48,947 images), Updated 1 Jun 2018

*  Denmark, Military Conscription Rolls, 1789-1792 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2243379); 154,218 indexed records with 9,228 record images (was 145,276 records with 9,228 images), Updated 31 May 2018

*  Peru, La Libertad, Civil Registration, 1903-1998        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2016224); 1,578,414 indexed records with 1,582,419 record images (was 1,578,414 records with 1,582,419 images), Updated 30 May 2018

*  Idaho, Southern Counties Obituaries, 1943-2013  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2290243); 1,514,987 indexed records with 52,677 record images (was 1,434,695 records with 52,677 images), Updated 29 May 2018

*  South Africa, Transvaal, Probate Records from the Master of the Supreme Court, 1869-1958        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2520237); 200,992 indexed records with 1,516,203 record images (was 200,992 records with 1,516,203 images), Updated 31 May 2018

*  Italy, Chieti, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1809-1930    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2419833); 339,924 indexed records with 505,027 record images (was 339,924 records with 505,027 images), Updated 29 May 2018

*  Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Public Records   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2841008); 481,583 indexed records with 481,583 record images (was 481,583 records with 481,583 images), Updated 2 Jun 2018

*  New Brunswick Late Registration of Births, 1810-1899    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1967766); Browse 24,015 Images only, no index (was 0 records with 24,015 images), Updated 1 Jun 2018

*  Liberia, Marriage Records, 1912-2015    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2100287); 54,883 indexed records with 24,406 record images (was 41,863 records with 24,406 images), Updated 29 May 2018

--- Collections with new records ---

*  Mexico, Yucat√°n, Civil Registration, 1860-2005  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1916248); 7,556 indexed records with 1,521,336 record images (was 0 records with 1,521,336 images),  14 Mar 2018

*  Mexico, Zacatecas, Civil Registration, 1860-2000        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1916240); 5,035 indexed records with 1,371,091 record images (was 0 records with 1,371,091 images),  14 Mar 2018

*  Mexico, Sonora, Civil Registration, 1861-1995   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1918289); 8,902 indexed records with 745,080 record images (was 0 records with 745,080 images),  14 Mar 2018

--- Collections with records removed ---

*  Texas Divorce Index, 1968-2010  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2038378); Index only (3,599,264 records), no images (was 3,599,265 records with 0 images),  5 Jun 2012

*  United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,168,490 indexed records with 46,885,712 record images (was 34,168,491 records with 46,885,712 images),  28 Dec 2017

*  Nevada Marriage Index, 1956-2005        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1949338); Index only (5,069,626 records), no images (was 5,069,627 records with 0 images),  6 Nov 2013

*  Nicaragua Civil Registration, 1809-2013 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1601210); 1,565,831 indexed records with 2,591,542 record images (was 1,565,832 records with 2,591,542 images),  22 Mar 2018

*  California, County Birth and Death Records, 1800-1994   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2001287); 777,004 indexed records with 2,915,415 record images (was 777,005 records with 2,915,415 images),  18 Jan 2018


============================================

In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner and use a keyword (e.g. "church england") to find collections with those keywords..

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

=============================================

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Randy at Jamboree 2018 - Day Two Activities

Day Two at Jamboree 2018 was busy - I went to three classes (out of six time slots), walked around the Exhibit Hall a bit, had an interview, took a nap, blogged a bit and took Linda out for dinner.  Linda spent about five hours in the swimming pool.

We had breakfast in the blogger lounge cafe, I had a banana and muffin, and Linda had a bagel.

My 8:30 a.m. class was "Bankruptcy to Equity: Using Federal Court Records" by Michael L. Strauss.  This was interesting because I have not used any of these records to date.  Michael's examples were excellent.

I took a quick spin through the Exhibit Hsll and then was off to the 10 a.m. class on "The DNA of the British Isles" by David Nicholson of LivingDNA.  The class was full, and I sat in the back so I couldn't see all of the details on the slides.  I had not heard of the Elmet Resistance in the 600 AD time frame in West Yorkshire, and I did not know that the Norman invasion in 1066 had little effect on British Isles DNA.

At 11 a.m., I found Linda in the pool and we had lunch in the breezeway between the buildings.  After lunch, I went into the Exhibit Hall and took photos, talked to Crista Cowan of Ancestry about the search problems (I think she said they are still using two different server systems for global searching, but the search of specific databases works fine.  She didn't know if all of the problems were fixed by the 31 May date) and the Member Tree indexing issue (she said this will be done when everything has been transferred and tested).  I posted my Day Two photos in Randy at Jamboree 2018 - Day Two Photos.

I came back to the room at 12:30 and updated my blogs.  At 1:30 I went down to the Boardroom and was interviewed by Andy Lee for the Family History Fanatics YouTube channel.  

I went to Craig Scott's excellent talk on "The French and Indian Wars" and learned a lot about colonial history from colonization to independence.  

At 3 p.m. I was back to the room and took an hour-long nap with Linda.  Then I worked on my blogs until she woke up.

*  We went off to dinner at 6 p.m. to Don Cuco's in downtown Burbank.  It was fast and good and relatively cheap.  We were back to the hotel by 7:30 and I worked on the Photo post and this post.

Saturday is the last day of the conference.  My Day 3 blog posts will be late (Sunday?) because we are leaving early to see my daughter's family on the way home.


=============================================


Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Surname Saturday - MERRIAM (England to colonial Massachusetts)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2121 who is Mary MERRIAM (1630-1721). 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through two generations in this MERRIAM family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

66.  Nathan Gates (1767-1830)

67.  Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)

132.  Simon Gates (1739-1803)
133.  Susanna Reed (1745-1833)

264.  Amos Gates (1706-1783)
265.  Mary Hubbard (1712-1754)


530.  Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753)
531.  Sarah Clark (1681-1720)

1060.  Jonathan Hubbard (1659-1728)
1061.  Hannah Rice (1658-1747)

2120.  John Hubbard, born 1630 in England; died before August 1702 in Hatfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 4240. George Hubbard and 4241. Mary LNU.  He married about 1649.
2121.  Mary Merriam, born about. 1630 in Hadlow, Kent, England; died 08 March 1721 in Hatfield, Hampshire, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of John Hubbard and Mary Merriam are:
*  Mary Hubbard (1651-1662).
*  John Hubbard (1655-1748), married 1676 Mary Wright (1663-1741).
*  Hannah Hubbard (1656-1662).
Jonathan Hubbard (1659-1728), married 1681 Hannah Rice (1658-1741).
*  Daniel Hubbard (1661-1744), married 1683 Esther Rice (1665-1738).
*  Mercy Hubbard (1664-????), married 1685 Jonathan Boardman (1660-1712).
*  Isaac Hubbard (1667-1750), married 1692 Anna Warner (1669-1750).
*  Mary Hubbard (1669-1754), married Daniel Warner (1666-1754).
*  Sarah Hubbard (1672-1754), married 1698 Samuel Cowles (1673-1750).

4242.  George Merriam, born about 1602 in Hadlow, Kent, England; died 29 December 1675 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 8484. William Merriam and 8485. Sarah Burges.  He married 16 October 1627 in Tonbridge, Kent, England.
4243.  Susan Raven, born about 1606 in Kent, England; died 08 October 1675 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of George Merriam and Susan Raven are:
Mary Merriam (1630-1721), married (1) 1649 John Hubbard (1630-1702); (2) 1705 Sampson Mason.
*  Samuel Merriam (1643-1705), married 1669 Elizabeth Townsend (1648-1705).

Information about this Merriam family was obtained from:

*  
Charles Henry Pope, Merriam Genealogy in England and America (Boston Mass. : n.p., 1906).

I have done no original research on this Merriam line.  

==============================================


Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, June 1, 2018

Randy at Jamboree 2018 - Day Two Photos

I took more photographs today on my perambulations around the Conference Center at the SCGS Genealogy Jamboree 2018 conference, but not too many.  Frankly, I forget to do this because I get involved in conversations, but I did take these:

1)  I visited the LivingDNA exhibit and talked to David Nicholson (and his wife?):


2)  The Ancestry.com "little theater" at the back of the exhibit was always busy:


3)  Lisa Alzo, Denise Levenick and Blaine Bettinger shared a table in the Exhibit Hall.  Lisa was there while the other two spoke:


4)  The "little theater" at the Family Tree Maker exhibit often featured Dick Humphrey of SCGS:


5)  The MyHeritage exhibit was always busy, with good candy too:


6)  Devon and Andy Lee (the Family History Fanatics) were selling books in the hallway and in the Exhibit Hall:


7)  The Daughters of the American Revolution exhibit minders chatted me up:


8)  Geoff Rasmussen and two colleagues were in the Legacy Family Tree exhibit:


That's all the photos I took today - I'll try to remember to take more tomorrow of other exhibitors and maybe some genea-blogging friends too!

=============================================



Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Genealogy News Bytes - 1 June 2018


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last four days include:

1)  News Articles:


*  Tracing Your Irish Ancestors, Fourth Edition – Still the Standard Reference for Irish Research


*  Introducing Our New HTML Tree on Geni

*  The Five Civilized Tribes to Host a Genealogy Conference in Oklahoma

*  Dutch Genealogy News for May 2018

2)  Record Databases:

*  Findmypast Announces New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday


*  1 June 2018 – New Genealogy Record Releases & Updates

3)  Genealogy Education:


 GeneaWebinars Calendar


*  Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for June 2018

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 5 June, 11 a.m. PDT:  Digital Gravestones, by Elisabeth Zetland

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 6 June, 11 a.m. PDT:  What Your Ancestor's Neighbors Can Tell You, by Melissa Barker

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  The Palatine Immigrants: Tracing and Locating 18th Century German Immigrants Online by Luana Darby.

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar: LDS Online Resources, by Luana Darby

*  The Genealogy Guys Podcast:  #344

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  Using the Steve Morse One Step Method Part 1 by Barbara J. Starkey; Part 2Part 3

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  English Civil Registration Made Easy by Kathryn Grant

*  The In-Depth Genealogist YouTube:  An Interview With Dan Debenham of Relative Race

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Understanding Ethnicity Part 2: Admixture Algorithms

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube: How do you begin tackling a difficult genealogy problem?

*  Findmypast YouTube:  The Story of Tom Hardy's Emigrant Ancestors - Findmypast Fridays Live 25 May 18

*  Jennifer Holik YouTube:  1 June 2018 Talking about grave adoption

*  23andMe YouTube:  ZDoggMD Dives into DNA and Doctors | 23andMe LIVE

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, June 1,  2018


5)  Neat Stuff:

  
15 Experiences Everyone Had At Grandma’s House

*  DNA test unites man with daughter he never knew existed

Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 29 May 2018?



==============================================


Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 1 June 2018

I received this information from Findmypast today:

================================================

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

There are over 2.7 million new records available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:



Were your catholic ancestors baptised in the Archdiocese of Chicago in Illinois? Over 1.2 million additional Sacramental registers dating from the mid-1800s up to 1925 have been added to our existing collection of Chicago Catholic Baptisms. Records will reveal the date and location of your ancestor's baptism, the names of their parents and their residence. Each result will provide a transcript and image of the original baptism register.

The Archdiocese of Chicago was first established as a diocese in 1843 and later as an archdiocese in 1880. It serves the Catholic population of Cook and Lake Counties in north eastern Illinois and consists of 6 vicariates and 31 deaneries.



Explore over 597,000 additional parish marriage records covering the Catholic population of Cook and Lake Counties in north-eastern Illinois.

Each result will provide a transcript and an image of the original marriage register that may reveal the couple's marriage date, marriage location, the names of their parents and the names of any witnesses.



Search over 229,000 recently added burial records to discover when and where your Catholic ancestors were laid to rest. Images may reveal additional details such as cause of death, residence, place of birth, father's name, mother's name and the name of the priest who conducted the service.

During the nineteenth century, Chicago was one of the fastest growing cities in the world, the population increasing twenty-fold between 1860 and 1910 to make it the fifth largest city in the world. Chicago was a veritable boomtown, with its population swelling with emigrants from Europe; Czech and Polish emigrants represented a large proportion of this growing population.



Our collection of Chicago Roman Catholic Parish Registers is now available to browse. Our browse function enables you to delve through original registers of baptisms, marriages and burials page by page.



Were your ancestors members of a Catholic congregation in Chicago? Explore more than 430,000 assorted congregational records from across the archdiocese to uncover vital biographical details as well as where and when your ancestors worshiped.



Over 43,000 additional records covering schools in County Mayo have been added to our collection of Ireland National School registers. The entire collection now contains more than 186,000 records from many areas of the country spanning the years 1860 to 1922.

School registers can reveal a variety of details related to your ancestor's schooling. Records may reveal how they did in school, how good their attendance was, how old they were and what their parents or guardians did for a living. These registers, from schools that have since closed down, give a fascinating insight into the multidenominational early school system and can be a valuable resource for genealogists. Please note, however, those images that include individuals born after the 100-year cut-off have been redacted; therefore, some entries only include a transcript.



Over 33,000 additional records have been added to our collection of Scottish Memorial Inscriptions. The collection includes records from 14 Scottish counties including the Isle of Skye and 209 burial grounds. A full list of the burial grounds, organised by county, found in Scotland monumental inscriptions index can be found through the link provided in Useful links and resources.

In this index, you will find burials as early as 1507, like Robert Graham buried at Kinneff church in Kincardineshire, and as recent as 2016, like Morag Hamilton buried in Carmichael cemetery in Lanarkshire.

 ===========================================

Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Randy at Jamboree 2018 - Day One

This was a fairly full day for me at the SCGS Genealogy Jamboree.  Thursday was the day for the JsmboFree, Genetic Genealogy and the Family History Writers Conferences.  I didn't sign up for the latter two, but do have access to the syllabus materials because I did sign up for the Genealogy Jsmboree Conference on Friday and Saturday.

Thursday started with an expensive and unsatisfying breakfast in The Daily Grill - scrambled eggs and tomato slices shouldn't cost $14.  Linda could 't eat the bagels in the blogger lounge so we ate at the restaurant.  Slow and expensive.  Did I mention expensive?  I thought so.

After breakfast, I walked over to the Pavilion where Barbara Randall was setting up her Genealogy Basics class.  They were still setting everything up when I got there.  I was one of the two room monitors for Barbara, and that went OK.  We had about 80 attendees, and my job was to hand out the Beginner's Kit and tell them to fill out the card for door prizes, and then Sheryl and I collected them.  I got to give the welcome talk and tell folks to turn off their cell phone ringers and the rest, and Sheryl introduced Barbara.  She did two sessions in 3 and a half hours, and we had a break in between.  She had eight door prizes to give out.  In the middle of the second session, the fire engine and ambulance drove up to the convention center, and took a fellow on a gurney who had a health problem.  Not the first time that's happened, I'm told.

At noon, I headed over to the room and picked up Linda and we went to the lunch area between the buildings.  I had a hamburger and chocolate chip cookies, and she had a turkey sandwich and chips.  We then went to the Exhibit Hall and walked around.  The 23andMe booth had a wheelspin for a chance at a DNA test, and other prizes.  We got a kids book on DNA.  I can use that!

During the afternoon, I had discussions with a number of friends and colleagues about many genealogy subjects;  I told several folks about my recent DNA match success.  I recall talking to Dallan Quass of RootsFinder, Steve Caguiat of FamilyTreeMaker, Daniel Horowitz and team of MyHeritage, Lisa Louise Cooke, Cynthia Richardson of Genlighten, Bruce Buzbee of RootsMagic, and Ray Raser of the Mayflower Society.  There are many more people to visit in the Exhibit Hall the next two days.

We got to meet James, the cute 10-month old son of Elyse and Jesse, and got a photo of them. He liked having his toes tickled.



At 3:30 p.m. I went back to the room and worked on the laptop, and convinced Linda to go swimming since the sun finally came out.  I went back to the room and took a na

At 6 p.m. I went down to help Linda out of the pool, and she took a shower and we went to dinner at 7:15 at the Daily Grill because it was late.  She can only eat salad for dinner there because of her allergies.  We both had a crappy Cobb salad - too much small lettuce bits and not enough of the goodies, for $22 each.  Plus a drink.  The sourdough bread was the best part of the dinner.  So another crappy meal at the Daily Grill for an exorbitant price.  Captive audience.  You' think we would learn.  Where to go tomorrow for dinner?  No clue.

Then it was back to the room and I'm blogging away before bed.

That's Day One - I enjoyed the discussions in the Exhibit Hall and seeing many geneabloggers and Genea-Musings readers during the day.

==============================================


Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, May 31, 2018

Seavers in the News - Lewis S. Dixon Death in 1923 in Boston

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Boston [Mass.] Herald newspaper dated Tuesday, 7 August 1923:


The transcription of this obituary is:

"Dr. Lewis S. Dixon

"The funeral of Dr. Lewis s. Dixon, Boston, oculist, who died Sunday night at the Charlesgate Hotel, wioll be held at the Forest Hills Chapel at 3 o'clock tomorrow.  He was 78 years old, and since 1891 had been associated with his cousin, Dr. robert B. Dixon, at 232 Clarendon street.

"He was a native of New York, and was the son of Dr. Rufus E. Dixon who practiced dentistry in Boston for 50 years.  He was a graduate of Harvard, class of '68, and later studied at the Harvard Medical School, from which he was graduated in 1869.  He was a member of the Harvard Club.  He is survived by a son, Prof. Roland Burrage Dixon, who is attached to the anthropological department at Harvard.  His wife, who was Miss Ellen R. Burrage, daughter of William Burrage of boston, died 10 years ago."

The source citation for this record is:

"Dr. Lewsi S. Dixon,Boston [Mass. Herald newspaper, 7 August 1923, page 12, column 1, Lewis S. Dixon obituary; digital image, GenealogyBank (www.genealogybank.com : accessed 24 May 2018), Newspaper Archives collection.

Why is this post about a Dixon and not a Seaver person?  Well, Lewis S[eaver] Dixon was born a Seaver, as explained in the post last week of Seavers in the News - Roland Burrage Dixon Death in 1934 in Boston.  

I wondered if there would be an obituary for Lewis S. Dixon, and I found it on GenealogyBank.  I wondered if it would mention that he was born a Seaver.  It didn't.  

The obituary names his step-father, Rufus E. Dixon, as his father.  Rufus Dixon (1816-1897) married Susan Waters (Dixon) (Seaver) Dixon (1825-1909) before 1855 probably in Massachusetts, as his second wife.  

Lewis Seaver Dixon (1845-1923) is still my 6th cousin 4x removed, since his birth parents were Lewis Wheaton and Susan Waters (Dixon) Seaver, who married in 1844.

=============================================



Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.