Sunday, March 1, 2020

RootsTech 2020 Salt Lake City Blog Compendium

This blog post will attempt to capture a link to all of the genealogy blog posts available from the RootsTech 2019 Conference in Salt Lake City (held 27 February to 2 March 2019).  This includes RootsTech related posts from the conference goers, and announcements and session descriptions from non-conference goers.


1)  Randy Seaver on Genea-Musings:


*  FREE Education Opportunities at RootsTech 2020 Salt Lake City -- Starts on Wednesday, 26 February (posted 25 February 2020)
A RootsTech Retrospective - Then and Now (posted 26 February 2020)
*  Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History (27 February 2020)
*  MyHeritage Adds Fan View for Your Family Tree (27 February 2020)

2)  James Tanner on Genealogy's Star:

*  Action in the Expo Hall: The Family History Guide Booth Goes Up for RootsTech 2020 (posted 25 February 2020)

3)  Roberta Estes on DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy:

The Road to RootsTech 2020 (posted 24 February 2020)
*  RootsTech 2020: Day 1 – My Sessions, Announcements & Friends (27 February 2020)
 Sneak Preview: FamilyTreeDNA’s myOrigins Version 3.0 (28 February 2020)

4)  Daniel Earl on Family History Guy:

*  RootsTech Vendor Hall Live Tweet Schedule (posted 25 February 2020)

5)  FamilyTreeDNA:

Come See us at RootsTech 2020 (posted 25 February 2020)

6)  Michaela Elliott on FOREVER:

*  RootsTech 2020: FOREVER Sponsors the World’s Largest Family History Conference (posted 25 February 2020)

7)  MyHeritage Blog:

*  Meet us at RootsTech: Explore our Spectacular Booth! by Talya (posted 26 February 2020)
MyHeritage Adds Huge Collection of Historical U.S. City Directories (28 February 2020)

8)  Miles Meyer on Miles' Genealogy Tips:

*  RootsTech 2020 - The Day Before (posted 26 February 2020)
RootsTech 2020 - Day 1 (26 February 2020)
*  RootsTech2020 - Day 2 - Innovation Showcase (27 February 2020)

9)  Rhonda Lauritzen on Evalogue.Life:

RootsTech 2020 Resources (posted 25 February 2020)

10)  Michael Booth on RootsMagic Blog:

*  RootsTech 2020: Classes and Discounts (and Something for Those at Home, too) (posted 25 February 2020)

11)  FamilySearch Blog:

RootsTech Then and Now, by Sunny Morton (posted 25 February 2020)

RootsTech Celebrates 10 Years, by Brianna Taylor (posted 26 February 2020)

12)  Janine Adams on Organize Your Family History:

Making the Most of RootsTech (posted 26 February 2020)

13)  Marie Beckman on MarieB's Genealogy Blog -- Southeastern USA:

*  RootsTech 2020--Day 1--Wed. Feb. 26th (posted 26 February 2020)
*  RootsTech 2020--Day 2--Thur. Feb. 27th (27 February 2020)

14)  Laura Hedgecock onTreasure Chest of Memories:

*  Rootstech 2020 Day 1 Re-Cap (posted 26 February 2020)

15) Drew Smith on The Genealogy Guys:

*  Genealogy Guys and Vivid-Pix Announce Unsung Heroes Awards at RootsTech 2020 (posted 27 Februry 2020)

16)  Shannon Combs-Bennett on Trials and Tribulations of a Family Historian:

*  Time flies when you are having fun at RootsTech (posted 27 February 2020)

17)  Ancestry.com Blog:

*  Ancestry® Announces Significant Content Additions and Improved Family History Research Tools at RootsTech, Empowering More Discoveries (posted 27 February 2020)

18)  Jenny Hawran on Like Herding Cats:

*  2020 RootsTech Day 1 Recap (posted 27 February 2020)

19)  Carole Steers on Davies of Mold:

RootsTech 2020 - 10 Years (posted 27 February 2020)

20)  Amiey Bowser Tennant on The Genealogy Reporter:

*  RootsTech 2020: A Day in Review (27 February 2020)

21)  Janice Sellers on Ancestral Dscoveries:

*  RootsTech 2020: I'm Back in Salt Lake City! (27 February 2020)

22)  Dick Eastman on Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter:

*  Explore British & Irish roots through your Findmypast Family Tree (27 February 2020)
*  MyHeritage Introduces Fan View for Family Trees (27 February 2020)
*  Findmypast’s Newspaper Archive Goes Global (28 February 2020)

This post will be updated on a regular basis until there are no more additions.

I may have missed a blog post from or about RootsTech.  If I have, please comment on this post and provide a link, and I will add it to the list.

First posted: 26 February 2020 - 12:40 p.m.  Last updated:  28 February 2020 - 8:40 a.m.



================================================

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https://www.geneamusings.com/2020/02/rootstech-2020-salt-lake-city-blog.html

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

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Friday, February 28, 2020

MyHeritage Announces Their Aggregated City Directory Collection

I received this via email from MyHeritage today:

=======================================

Today we announce the addition of a huge collection of U.S. City Directories. The collection was produced by MyHeritage from 25,000 public U.S. city directories published between 1860 and 1960. It comprises 545 million aggregated records that have been automatically consolidated from 1.3 billion records.
City directories contain an alphabetical list of adult residents and heads of household (often with their spouse) with addresses and occupations, a business directory, information about local officials, clubs, churches, cemeteries, schools, and a street guide.
PR_image_city_directories
This addition grows the total size of MyHeritage’s historical record database to 11.9 billion records!
Learn more about the U.S. City Directories collection in the press release below and on our blog post
==========================================

NOTE:  This collection aggregates City Directory entries for a specific person.  Consequently, a user can see all of the entries for a person in one result, rather than 20 or 30 results for the person. Here is the result for my grandfather (two screens):



Disclosure:  I  receive a complimentary subscription from MyHeritage for publicizing MyHeritage events and products.  I have accepted financial considerations from MyHeritage and Legacy Family Tree in past years for services rendered and for conference luncheons.

The URL for this post is:  
Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

RootsTech 2020 Innovation and Technology Forum Summary

On Thursday morning, before the Expo Hall opened at RootsTech 2020, I attended the Innovation and Technology Forum in the Ruby Room at the Salt Palace.

The conference schedule describes it as:
"The Innovation and Technology forum is a fast-paced, entertaining event emcee'd by D. Josh Taylor, past President of the Federation of Genealogy Societies.  Clark G. Gilbert, former professor of entrepreneurial management at Harvard Business School, past president of BYU-1, past president of Deseret News, and current president of BYU-Pathway Worldwide will be out keynote speaker.  After the keynote address, attendees will witness lightning presentations by the biggest industry leaders such as Ancestry and Findmypast, as well as new up-and-coming players.  These organizations will showcase their latest technology and innovations.  Each audience member will rate each presentation and have the opportunity to provide private feedback directly to each presenting organization.  Your feedback will influence the future direction of this industry.  Each attendee will receive a special swag item for coming and participating in the event.  Come join us in the largest genealogical innovation event in the world."
Steve Rockwood of FamilySearch led off and introduced Joshua Taylor, who introduced Clark G. Gilbert, the keynote speaker.  

Clark discussed the 5 Reasons We Follow the Crowd.  This slide summarizes the points:

Josh Taylor came back and talked about the five top innovations in genealogy and family history over the past 20 years.  He noted:

1)  Online access to census records
2)  FamilySearch Record Pilot, resulting in digital microfilm
3)  Crowd Source Indexing
4)  Automated Hint s and Matching
5)  Consumer Autosomal DNA Tests

He then  noted four things what we need in the future:

1)  Tools to make family history accessible
2)  Technology to assist interpretation and understanding of search results
3)  Technology to help us learn
4)  Technology that enables us to share.

Josh then  introduced the industry speakers in turn (I didn't get all of the names so will only highlight the company or organization names):

1)  Ancestry.com:  Introduced us to Story Scout:

This sounds very useful for Ancestry users, especially beginners.  It seemed similar to the FamilySearch Discovery centers.

2)  Treasure Key - using a Virtual Reality world online to tell interactive family stories - Treasured.ca:

3)  WieWasWie - the Dutch family tree site which has used machine learning to create family groups from civil records:


4)  FamilySearch.org - continues to improve access to record images in their catalog, and the speed in bringing them online (now 24 hours).  The chart below shows the growth in number of images each year from 2010:

5)  Filae.com - French records online from official civil records, census records and historical archives:

6)  Findmypast highlighted their achievements in 2019, as shown in the screen below:


7)  TimeMachine.eu - their site says:  "Time Machine builds a large scale simulator mapping 2000 years of European History, transforming kilometres of archives and large collections from museums into a digital information system.":


I left before the closing remarks from Steve Rockwood, and missed receiving the free swag gift.

This was an interesting two hour forum, and I wish I was better at note taking and could remember more about each presentation.  I do have more photos of some of the presentation slides.

After this presentation, I went to the Media Hub, and tried to blog a bit, but it was also an excellent time to see genea-friends I hadn't seen for two years to discuss our lives and families.  Thank you to everyone who came by to welcome me back to RootsTech!!!  My tribe...

                         ==============================================

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 319: #530 Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753) of Concord, Massachusetts

Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753)  is number 530 on my Ahnentafel List, my 7th great-grandfather, who married #531 Sarah Rice (1681-1720)  in 1709 in Concord, Middlesex County, Massachusetts.

I am descended through:

*  their daughter #265 Mary Hubbard (1712-1754) who married #264 Amos Gates (1706-1783) in 1732.
*  their son #132 Simon Gates (1739-1803) who married #133 Susannah Reed (1745-1833) in 1766.
*  their son #66 Nathan Gates (1767-1830) who married #67 Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855) in 1790.
*  their daughter, #33 Abigail Gates (1797-1867) who married  #32 Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)  in 1817.
*  their son #16 Isaac Seaver (1823-1901) who married #17 Lucretia Townsend Smith (1828-1884) in 1851.
*  their son #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) who married #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) who married #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)  in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

=====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 

*   Name:                         Samuel Hubbard[1–4,6]
*  Alternate Name:          Samuel Hubburd [5,7]    

*  Sex:                             Male    

*  Father:                         Jonathan Hubbard (1658-1728)    
*  Mother:                       Hannah Rice (1658-1747)  
 
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Birth:                           27 April 1687, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1,5]    

*  Distribution :               25 November 1728 (age 41), father's will proved; Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[6]    

*  Will:                            2 September 1747 (age 60), will written, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[4]    

*  Death:                         12 December 1753 (age 66), Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1,3,7]    
*  Burial:                        after 12 December 1753 (after age 66), Old Hill Burying Ground, Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[3]    

*  Probate:                      28 January 1754 (age 66), will proved; Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[4]  

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Spouse 1:                    Sarah Clark (1681-1720)    
*  Marriage 1:                 8 December 1709 (age 22), Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1,8]    

*  Child 1:                      Ephraim Hubbard (1710-1791)    
*  Child 2:                     Mary Hubbard (1712-1754)    
*  Child 3:                     Samuel Hubbard (1714-1783)    
*  Child 4:                     Sarah Hubbard (1716-1802)    
*  Child 5:                     Lois Hubbard (1718-    )    

*  Spouse 2:                  Prudence Temple (1692-    )    
*  Marriage 2:               about 1721 (about age 34), probably Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1]
   
*  Child 6:                     Lydia Hubbard (1722-1800)    
*  Child 7:                     Silence Hubbard (1725-1806)    
*  Child 8:                     Isaac Hubbard (1729-1804)  

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):  
 
The book One Thousand Years of Hubbard History, 866 to 1895 by Edward Warren Day provides basic information about the Hubbard families of New England, including Samuel Hubbard (1687-1753)[1].

Samuel Hubbard was born on 27 April 1687 in Concord, Massachusetts, the son of Jonathan and Sarah (Rice) Hubbard of Concord[1,5].  The birth record in the Concord town record book says:
"Sam^ll Hubburd y^e Son of Jonathan Hubburd & Hanah his wife was Born Aprill y^ 17th day, 1687"
He married, first, on 8 December 1709 in Concord to Sarah Clark (1681-1720), the daughter of Samuel and Rachel (Nichols) Clark of Concord[1,8].  The Concord town record book says:
"Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark both of Concord were marryed by y^e Rever^nd M^r Joseph Estabrooke December y^e 8th day, 1709"
They had five children, and their births were recorded in the Concord town record book:

*  Ephraim Hubbard (1710-1791), married (1) 1739 Ruth Gates (1716-1742), married (2) 1744 Sarah Billings (1719-????).
*  Mary Hubbard (1712-1754), married 1732 Amos Gates (1706-1783).
*  Samuel Hubbard (1714-1783), married (1) 1738 Eunice Woodward (1717-1749); married (2) 1750 Abigail Flagg (1721-1772); married (3) 1779 Elizabeth Brooks (1730-1807).
*  Sarah Hubbard (1716-1802), married 1732 Samuel Jones (1707-1802).
*  Lois Hubbard (1718-????).

Sarah (Clark) Hubbard died on 24 July 1720 in Concord, aged 39.

Samuel Hubbard married, second, in about 1721 in Concord to Prudence Temple (1692-????)[1].  They had three children, and their births were recorded in the Concord town record book:

*  Lydia Hubbard (1722-1800), married 1743 Zechariah Davis (1715-1793).
*  Silence Hubbard (1725-1806), married 1745 Joseph Darby (1718-1793).
*  Isaac Hubbard (1729-1804), married 1753 Sarah Darby (1733-????).

Samuel's father, Jonathan Hubbard (1659-1728) died testate on 17 July 1728.  In his will, Jonathan Hubbard bequeathed the following to his son, Samuel Hubbard[4]:
"To my Son Samll Hubburd three pounds of money and my muff." and a share of his clothing.
Samuel Hubbard died on 12 December 1753 in Concord, Massachusetts[1,3,7].  He is buried in Old Hill Burying Ground in Concord.  The inscription on the stone says:

"Memento mori
Here lyes the Body of
Mr. Samuel Hubbard
who departed this Life
December y^e 19^th AD !753
aged 66 years & 8 months"

Samuel Hubbard died testate, and his probate papers are in Middlesex County Probate Records, Probate Packet #12,200[4]. The will of Samuel Hubbard, late of Concord, taylor, was written on 2 September 1747 after the death of his mother.  It was presented to the Probate Court on 28 January 1754 by the executor, Isaac Hubbard, with witnesses Jonas Haywood and Ephraim Wood, Junior.  The will was accepted by the Court.  Isaac Hubbard (husbandman) and Jonas Hubbard (cordwainer - probably Jonas Heywood, since his signature appears on the document), both of Concord, posted bond of 300 pounds with the Court.

The will, written in a clear hand, says[4]:
"In the Name of God Amen.  The Second Day of September in the Twenty first year of His Majesties Reign annogree Domini one Thousand and Seven Hundred and forty seven.  I Samuel Hubbard of Concord in the County of Middlesex, within the province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England Taylor, being in good bodyly health and of perfect mind and memory Thanks be to God therefor.  But Calling to mind the mortality of my Body, and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to Die, Do make & ordain this my Last Will and Testament.
"First and Principally I give & Recommend my soul to the Hands of God that gave it.  And my Body I commend to the Earth to be buried, in a Christian and Decent manner, at the Discreation of my Executor (hereafter named) northing Doubting but at the Resurection I Shall Receive the same by the mighty Power of God.
"Imprinus.  I Will and Bequeath unto Prudence Hubbard my now dearly beloved Wife all my Houshold goods propper to be used within Doors, of every sort to her own Disposal forever.  also my Will is that my sd Wife shall have the improvement of the whole of my now Dwelling house with Liberty to pass to and from the same for firewood and water &c. Further my Will is that my Executor or his Heirs Executors or administrators shall yearly and every year provide for and Deliver to my abovesd wife six bushel of marchantable Indian corn, four bushel of Rie and one bushel and an half of malt and one Hundred & forty pound of marchatable pork and two barrels of Cyder, and a sufficiency of firewood Cut fit for the fire, an one Cow kept for her use, summers & winters, also three pounds money old Tenor.  And if my said Wife Die my Widow, my Will is that he my said Executor bestow upon her a Decant Christian Burial.  The articles above shall duely & yearly be performed towards my sd wife by my Executor During her natural Life if she Die my Widow;  but if she shall marry to another man in that case at her marriage my Executor shall be quit from any further payments as abovesaid (only she shall be the sole owner of my Household goods as abovesaid) also at her second marriage she shall quit the Improvement of sd Dwelling house.
"It.  I give to my sons Ephraim Hubbard and Samuel Hubbard all my wearing apparrel to be equally Divided between them.
It.  I Give to Ephraim Hubbard my Eldest son the sum of fifty pounds money according to old Tenour.
"It.  I Give to Samuel Hubbard my second son the sum of twenty pounds money according to old Tenour.
"It.  I Give to my Daughter Mary Gates the sum of thirty pounds money according to old Tenour.
"It.  I Give to my Daughter Sarah Jones the sum of thirty pounds money according to old Tenour.
"It.  I Give to my Daughter Lydia Davis the sum of forty pounds money according to old Tenour.
"I Give to Silance Darby my youngest Daughter the sum of thirty pounds money according to old Tenour;  further my will is that my Executor pay the Respective sums of money to the six children above named or their Leagal Representatives within one full year after my Decase.
"I Give to my Grandaughter Lois Hubbard Eldest Daughter of my son Ephraim Hubbard, if she arrive to the age of eighteen years, the sum of ten pounds according to old Tenour in Bills of publick Credit.
"I Give to my Grandaughter Sarah Hubbard Eldest Daughter of my son Samuel Hubbard, if she arrive to the age of eighteen years the sum of ten pounds according to old Tenour in Bills of Publick Credit.  The Leagacies to sd grandchildren to be Payd to them by my Executor when they arrive to the age of eighteen years Respectively.
"The Remainder of my Estate both Real and Personal of what Name or nature soever (besides what is given as abovementioned) I Give and Bequeath to my youngest son Isaac Hubbard forever.  Whom I also Constitute make and ordain the only and sole Executor of this my Last Will and Testament and I do Hereby utterly Revoke make null and void all other Wills and Testaments by me made at any time.  Confirming this as my Last Will and Testament IN Witness Whereof I have affixed my Hand and Seal the Day of the Date above written.
"Signed Sealed PronouncedPublished and DeclaredIn the Presents of us Witnesses                  Samuel Hubbard
Jonas HeywoodEphraim Wood JunrSamuel Heywood"
No inventory, account or distribution was included in the probate packet.

5.  SOURCES

1. Edward Warren Day, One Thousand Years of Hubbard History, 866 to 1895 (New York, N.Y. : Harland Page Hubbard, 1895), page 223, Samuel Hubbard of Concord sketch.

2. George Tolman (compiler), Concord, Massachusetts Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850 (Concord, Mass. : Committee on Printing, 1894), Deaths, Volume II, page 453, Samuel Hubbard entry, age 66-8.

3. Find A Grave, indexed database and digital image,  (http://www.findagrave.com), Old Hill Burying Ground (Concord, Mass.), Samuel Hubbard memorial # 20647324.

4. "Middlesex County, MA: Probate Papers, 1648-1871," digital image, American Ancestors (http://www.AmericanAncestors.org : accessed, 6 November 2016), Probate Packet 12,200, Samuel Hubbard, taylor of Concord, will written 2 September 1747, proved 28 January 1754.

5. George Tolman (compiler), Concord, Massachusetts Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850, Concord Registers -- Book II, page 31, Samuell Hubburd birth entry, 1687.

6. "Middlesex County, MA: Probate Papers, 1648-1871," digital image, American Ancestors (http://www.AmericanAncestors.org : accessed, 6 November 2016), Probate Packet 12,191, 8 images, Jonathan Hubburd estate, will proved 1728; original probate papers in Middlesex County, Mass. Probate Court, Cambridge, Mass.

7. George Tolman (compiler), Concord, Massachusetts Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850, Deaths, Volume II, "Concord Burying Grounds," page 433, Samuel Hubbard entry, age 66-8.

8. George Tolman (compiler), Concord, Massachusetts Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850, Marriages, Volume II, page 74, Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark entry.

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NOTE:  In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2020 for a seventh year to 364 Ancestors in 364 Weeks.  The list of 52 Ancestors biographies from my great-grandparents to the 7th great-grandparents (in work) is in   https://www.geneamusings.com/p/ancestor-biographies.html.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, February 27, 2020

Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History

I received this information from Ancestry.com today:

============================================

Ancestry® Announces Digitization of All 36 Million Available US Draft Cards, Answering More Members’ Questions About Family History


LEHI, Utah and SAN FRANCISCO, California, February 28, 2020 - Today at RootsTech, the largest family history technology conference, Ancestry® announced the release of a game-changing content collection of all 36 million of the nation’s available World War II young man’s draft cards, further empowering customers’ journeys of personal discovery. Available now on Ancestry, the completion of this multi-year project with the US National Archives & Records Administration involved digitizing these valuable records to create a fully searchable collection, including color images. The World War II draft card collection adds to more than 24 billion records available on Ancestry.com, including historical records from its archive partners and family tree records, stories, and photographs from the community.
“For more than 30 years, Ancestry has continued its unwavering commitment to family history and helping millions of people discover more about themselves and their past,” said Todd Godfrey, Vice President for Global Content, Ancestry. “This year marks the 75th anniversary of the end of World War II, and today we are excited to announce significant content additions with the digitization of all 36 million of the nation’s available World War II young man’s draft cards. These records add to the largest collection of US military records for family history research. We are proud to continue investing in building the best tools and the largest record collections that answer more questions about your family story and give our members the personal discovery journey they deserve.”
Ancestry has a long-term commitment to records, investing more than $300 million over the past 20 years--and this significant record addition demonstrates the value Ancestry places on historical records in enabling members to make new discoveries. A single draft card can be a very helpful starting point for new users beginning to build a family tree and can lead to more meaningful discoveries due to the rich and unique details they often include, such as physical description, eye color, employer, next of kin, and even why someone was exempt from the draft. Imaging and transcribing the records took nearly 90,000 hours and was done in partnership with the US National Archives & Records Administration and volunteers from FamilySearch.
Ancestry members have built over 100 million family trees with more than 12 billion ancestor profiles and helped create a DNA network of 16 million people. After listening to customer feedback, Ancestry has implemented innovative technology and unveiled significant content collections--such as the World War II Draft Cards--that help answer more family history questions faster, solve members’ most important needs, and provide new ways to deliver even more discoveries. It’s easier than ever to learn your family story by searching existing and new collections--with even more to come.
In 2020, Ancestry will also be releasing New York City Certificate Indexes for Birth, Marriage, and Death records (over 14 million records from 1862-1949). There are also nine state-wide digitization projects and we are unveiling new Naturalization records from six US states. On an international level, this year over 100 million new records will be added from national collections in Denmark, Finland, France, Germany, Mexico, and Norway, including more than six million Mexico Catholic records and over 50 million France Census and Birth, Marriage and Death records.
For more information on World War II Draft Cards and additional new content and tools, please visit https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/2238/.
                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have a complimentary all-access subscription from Ancestry.com, for which I am thankful.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.


Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

MyHeritage Adds Fan View for Your Family Tree

I received this information from MyHeritage today:

============================================

I’m pleased to share that today MyHeritage has released a new view for family trees: Fan View.

Fan View offers a colorful and interactive representation of your family history research. Fan View is dynamic: you can change the root individual to display different versions of the fan, and it includes 2 display modes: Text mode, which lists ancestors’ names, relationship to the root individual, and dates of birth and death, and Color mode, which displays your main ancestral surnames, and shows which lines can benefit from more research.
We’ve also added a sharing widget, so you can showcase your beautiful work to your family and on your social networks.    

For more information please see our blog announcement here https://blog.myheritage.com/2020/02/introducing-fan-view-for-family-trees/

============================================

Here is my 7-generation fan chart on MyHeritage:

And here is my color fan chart (different shades for different great-grandparent ):


Disclosure:  I  receive a complimentary subscription from MyHeritage for publicizing MyHeritage events and products.  I have accepted financial considerations from MyHeritage and Legacy Family Tree in past years for services rendered and for conference luncheons.

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Seavers in the News -- Robert C. Seaver Dies in 1945 in Massachusetts

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from The Boston [Mass.] Globe newspaper dated 26 March 1945:

The transcription of the article is:

"Robert C. Seaver
Former State Tennis Champion is Dead

"Robert C. Seaver, 68-year-old veteran Boston investment broker of Brookline and former Massachusetts lawn tennis champion, died yesterday at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Frances Brooks, in Duxbury.

"Mr. Seaver, a resident of Longwood Towers, was well known in the investment field for the past quarter-century as  partner of Wise, Hobbs & Seaver, Inc., Congress. st.

"Born in Brookline, the son of the late Mr. and Mrs. William J. Seaver, he was graduated from Williams College, where he excelled in sports.  In the early 1900's he was state singles and doubles champion in tennis.  He served as secretary of the Longwood Cricket Club and was a member of the Brae Burn Country Club.  His father was a former Selectman at Brookline.

"He is survived, besides his daughter, by his widow, the former Mary McIntyre, and a sister, Alice, of Brookline."

The source citation is:

"Robert C. Seaver, Former State Tennis Champion is Dead," The Boston [Mass.] Globe newspaper, obituary, Monday, 26 March 1845, page 8, column 5, Robert C. Seaver obituaryNewspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 20 February 2020).

Robert Chauncey Seaver (1877-1945) is in my RootsMagic famly tree database, He was born 8 January 1877 in Brookline, Massachusetts, the son of William James Seaver (1836-1917) and Martha Dickenson Stodder (1847-1923).  He married (1) Edith Fanueil Willard (1891-1921) in 1912, and they had one child, Frances Stodder Seaver (1912-2010), who married Charles Stratton Brooks (1912-1976) in 1941.  Robert Chauncey Seaver married (2) Mary McIntyre (1893-1986) in 1922.  

Robert Chauncey Seaver (1877-1945) is my 6th cousin 4 times removed.  

There are over 9,000 Seaver "stories" in my family tree - this was one of them.   Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and sometimes a well-known person gets a decent obituary.  I am glad that I can honor Robert Chauncey Seaver today.

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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.




Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

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Treasure Chest Thursday -- 1709 Marriage Record of Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark in Concord, Mass.

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1709 marriage record of Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark in the Concord, Massachusetts vital town record book:



The marriage record for Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark is the second entry in the Marriages section of the page:




This record says:

"
"Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark both of concord were marryed by y^e Rever^nd Joseph Estabrooke Decemb^r y^e 8th day, 1709"

The source citation for this record is:


George Tolman (compiler), Concord, Massachusetts Births, Marriages and Deaths, 1635-1850 (Concord, Mass. : Committee on Printing, 1894), Concord births, Marriages and Deaths, page 74, Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark marriage entry, 1709.

This record is a Derivative Source with Primary Information and Direct Evidence of the names of Samuel Hubburd and Sarah Clark, and the marriage date and place.  The Original Source is a town record book marriage register and a county marriage register that are no longer available.  Apparently, the records in this book are from a copy of the original register.  They are still Primary Information and Direct Evidence for the names and marriage event.

Samuel Hubburd (1687-1753) was the son of Jonathan and Hannah (Rice) Hubburd of Concord, Massachusetts.  Sarah Clark (1681-1720) was the daughter of Samuel and Rachel (Nichols) Clark of concord.  

Samuel and Sarah (Clark) Hubburd are my 7th great-grandparents, through their daughter Mary Hubburd (1712-1754) who married Amos Gates (1706-1783) in 1732.

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Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.