Monday, May 25, 2020

Monday Genea-Pourri - Week Ending 25 May 2020

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)  Moderated and hosted the Chula Vista Genealogical Society DNA Interest Group meeting on Wednesday, 20 May in a Zoom meeting, with 12 in attendance.  I discussed the new AncestryDNA Tree icons and the changed DNA Match screen with a ThruLine; the MyHeritageDNA Theory of Family Relativity update, along with how I write Notes and use the chromosome browser; the CeCe Moore TV show on 26 May; ethnicity estimates and communicating with AncestryDNA matches.  In the second hour, the attendees discussed their challenges and successes.

2)  Participated in the San Diego Genelaogical Society DNA Interest Group Zoom meeting on Saturday, 23 May.  Colin made two presentations - an Overview of recent DNA features, and on GEDmatch.

3)  Participated in today's Mondays With Myrt on Zoom.  We learned how to set up the Closed Captioning using Streamer and tested it out.  

4)  Watched the Family Tree Webinar "Fridays in May: Your Questions Answered LIVE—More DNA with Diahan" by Diahan Southard.

5)  Wrote and posted a biographical sketch of 7th great-grandfather #542 George Stearns  (1688-1760) for my 52 Ancestors biographical sketch on Friday.  

6)  Transcribed the 1783 Will of Nathan Brigham (1693-1784) of Southborough, Mass. for Amanuensis Monday.  

7)  Continued sorting out the Seaver families in Philadelphia in the 1850-1900 time frame.  Wrote a series of blog posts about some of them.  Added events and sources to many of them with Ancestry Hints.

8)  Added Notes to about 26 more AncestryDNA matches with cM values, relationships and known common ancestors.  Added one AncestryDNA ThruLine to the RootsMagic family tree database.  Reviewed new DNA matches on AncestryDNA, MyHeritageDNA, FamilyTreeDNA and 23andMe.  

9) There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 35,807 of my RootsMagic persons with FamilySearch Family Tree profiles (up 134).

10)  Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and sources to my RootsMagic profiles.  I now have 57,656 persons in my RootsMagic file (up 148) , and 121,180 source citations (up 579).   I TreeShared with my Ancestry Member Tree two times this week updating 341 profiles, and I resolved 881 Ancestry Hints.  I've fallen behind on the Ancestry Record Hints with 131,309 to be resolved, but I work on them almost daily.    

11)  Updated my presentation on "Using Collaborative 'BIG' Family Trees" for the CVGS program on Wednesday in a Zoom meeting.

12)  Wrote 20 Genea-Musings blog posts last week, of which two were a press release.  The most popular post last week was Did Sarah Giberson Marry Two Seaver Men? - Part I with over 458 views.  

13)  We are still fine here at the Genea-cave, hunkered down and not going out much.  I went to the grocery store on Tuesday and Friday and it wasn't too busy.  I picked some weeds and am still thinking about mowing the back yard again.  I pushed Linda in the wheelchair up and down the block on Sunday.We watched the church choir and pastor's sermon on YouTube on Sunday.  Other than that, it was stay-at-home on the computer doing genealogy, eating and sleeping, plus reading ebooks on my laptop while watching TV.

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The URL for this post is:  
https://www.geneamusings.com/2020/05/monday-genea-pourri-week-ending-25-may.html

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Did Sarah Giberson Marry Two Seaver Men? - Part III

In Part I of this series, I sorted through census records concerning the family of Sarah Giberson (1837-1902) who, apparently, married (1) John Seaver in about 1856 and (2) Samuel C. Seaver in about 1870 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  In Part II, I found church and vital record information for Sarah, her apparent two husbands, and their children.  I also found a birth record for the son, John Ellsworth Seaver (1861-1926) that named his mother as "Sarah" and the father as "John Seaver."

1)  The last part of this puzzle is the relationship between her two husbands, John C. Seaver (1834-1866) and Samuel C. Seaver (1832-1895).  And who was Clayton Seaver (1832-1915) who appeared in the church records in Philadelphia with two (?) wives and a number of children?  Also, Samuel C. Seaver and his son George W. Seaver appeared in Clayton's household in 1870.

My working hypothesis was that Clayton, John and Samuel were brothers, because they were in the same place (census and church records) in the same time frame (1860-1900) and had the same occupation (shovel maker) in the census records.

2)  I found an 1850 U.S. Census record for the Clayton Seaver household in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania (indexed as "Levers"):

This household includes:

*  Clayton Severs - age 48, male, a baker, born in N.J.
*  Phebae Severs - age 48, female, born PA
*  Clayton Severs - age 19, male, shovel maker, born PA
*  John Severs - age 17, male, shovel maker, born PA
*  Samuel Severs - 16, male, no occupation, born PA
*  Anna M. Severs - age 13, female, born PA
*  George Severs - age 7, male, born PA, attends school

3)  This Clayton Seaver/Severs appears in the 1860 U.S. Census in Philadelphia:


This household includes:

*  Clayton Seavers - age 55, male, shovel maker, born New Jersey
*  Margaret Severs - age 63, female, born Pennsylvania

4)  Clayton Severs also appears in the 1870 U.S. Census in Philadelphia:

This household includes:

*  Clayton Severs - age 70, male, white, born Penn, father of foreign birth, mother of foreign birth, a male citizen over 21 years
*  Marg't Severs - age 73, female, white, keeps house, born Penn, father of foreign birth, mother of foreign birth

5)  I have found no birth, marriage, death, probate or church records for the elder Clayton Seaver/Severs or Phoebe (--?--) Seaver/Severs (who may have died before 1860), or for Margaret Seaver/Severs (who is probably the second wife of the elder Clayton).  

6)  If all of the information on the census records and the church records are correct, then:

*   Clayton Seaver/Severs (born about 1802 in New Jersey) had parents who migrated to the USA, and died before 1880.
*  Phoebe (--?--) Seaver/Severs (born about 1802 in Pennsylvania) married Clayton Seaver in about 1829 and was the mother of the five children listed (and perhaps others), and died before 1860.
*  Margaret (--?--) Seaver/Severs (born about 1799 in Pennsylvania) married Clayton Seaver/Severs before 1860 and died before 1880.

These records spell the surnames Seaver, Seavers, Sever, or Severs (or Leaver or Levers in indexes) almost interchangeably, and that is very common in census records from the 1800s.  The church and vital records are more consistent in surname spelling.

7)  So the answer to the main question on this blog series is YES - Sarah A. Giberson married brothers John C. Seaver (1832-1866) and Samuel C. Seaver (1834-1895), and had children by both husbands.

One final thought - the John Ellsworth Seaver (1861-1926) death certificate says his parents names are John Seaver and Phoebe Faunce.  Did the informant mix up the mother's name, and gave John Ellsworth Seaver's grandmother's maiden name - Phoebe --?--?  If so, then Phoebe --?--'s maiden name may be Faunce.

8)  Note:  In these blog posts, I have tried to find relationships that match all of the information in the records.  I know that some of the mother's names for children of John and Sarah (Giberson) Seaver are wrong - it says Mary, not Sarah.  Everything else, to my knowledge, reflects the found church, census and death records.

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Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Amanuensis Monday - 1783 Will of Nathan Brigham (1693-1784) of Southborough, Mass.

This week's document for transcription is the 1783 will of Nathan Brigham (1693-1784) of Southborough, Massachusetts, in Probate Packet 7,414 in the Worcester County, Massachusetts probate court records.  

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[page 3, image 9 of 11]

The transcription of this will is:

[page 1, image 3 of 11]

In the Name of God amen, This first day of January Anno Domini

1783.  I, Nathan Brigham of Southborough in the County of Worcester
Gentleman, being far advanced in age but of sound and disposing
mind, and Calling to mind the mortality of my Body and the uncer-
tainty of Human life, do make and Ordain this my last will &
Testament.

First of all I humbly recommend my Soul to God who gave it,
hoping through the merits of Jesus Christ to obtain Eternal life
in a better world, my Body I Commit to the Earth to be Buried
in decent Christian Burial at the discretion of my Executor,
nothing doubting but at the general Resurrection I shall by the
mighty power of God received the Same again.

And as touching such worldly Goods and Estate as God has
been pleased to Bless me with in this life, I Will and dispose of in
manner following.

Imprimis.  My will is that all my just Debts and Funeral Charges
be paid by my Executor (hereafter Named out of my Personal Estate).

Item.  I Give and Bequeath to Martha my wife during her remaining
my Widow the use and Improvement of the Northerly end of my Dwelling
House from Top to Bottom with the Cellar under the South Room (and
a priviledge in the Well for water, and a priviledge at the Door for laying
of Wood, also the use of my Garden by the Cyder mill, and instead of her dower
in my Real Estate as Lands &c and at her special instance and Request
I will and Order that my son elijah Brigham bring and deliver to my
said wife at my dwelling House during her remaining my widow annually
each year in the proper Seasons thereof the following articles viz't. Seven
Bushels and an half of Indian Corn with the same Quantity of Rye, pro-
viding good dry Casks Sufficient to hold the same, one Bushel of Wheat
two Bushels and an half of malt, one Barrel of Sweet Cyder, and five
Barrel of common Cyder providing Casks for the same, Six Bushels of
apples, two Bushels of Turnips, two Bushels of Potatoes, one peck of Beans
one peck of Peas, two Hundred weight of Pork, one Hundred weight of Beef,
thirty weight of Butter, forty weight of Cheese, ten pounds of flax, and five
pounds of Wool, also a Sufficiency of fire Wood brought to the door & Cut
ready for the fire, also to find her a Horse to Ride to Meeting and other
necessary Occasions, also I give to my said wife to be at her own disposal
all that was her Sister De Luena's viz't. the ????? Irons, one Bible and
Trunk, two Chairs one Bed and Furniture thereto belonging, one Round
Table together with all her Tea utensels, also I give and Bequeath to my

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said wife one Iron pot, one Ieron Kettle, two small Brass Kettles, one
Iron Skillet, one Tramel, one pair of Handirons, one Meat Tub, two
Washing Tubs, two pails and one third part of my Pewter,  I also give
and Bequeath to my said wife one Bed and Beding, with all the Household
Furniture that my wife brought to me when I Married her that may be found
after my decease, one coverlet also one Cow to be at her disposal for ever, and
to be kept for her Summer and winter during her remaining my widow, also
one dutch Oven, one half dozen of Knives and forks, one flatt Bottomed Brass
Candlesticks, and Forty Shillings Lawful money to be paid to my said wife
by my Executor annually so long as she shall remain my widow.

Item I Give and Bequeath unto my Son Nathan Brigham about nine acres of
Land lying partly in Southborough & partly in Westborough being what I now
own which I purchased of Elisha Wood dec'd.  I also Give and Bequeath to my
three Sons, Nathan Brigham Edmund Brigham and Elijah Brigham
two pieces of Cerder Swamp scituate in Westborough one piece lying in
Chancey Swamp, and the other piece lying in Island Swamp so Called with all
the Land I have taken up adjoining thereto, to be equally divided between
them.  I also give and Bequeath to my Son Nathan Brigham one Bed and
Bedding also my Cane that was my Fathers, also a Case with one quarter
part of my wearing apparel, and also Six pounds thirteen shillings and four
pence lawful money to be paid him by my Executor in five years after my
decease, also Eight acres of my Town Right with out the Cow common
all which shall be his full share out of my Estate.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my son Edmund Brigham one half of my Sixteen
Acres of town Right without the Cow Common with one quarter part of my
wearing apparel, which with what he has already had out of my Estate shall
be his part in full.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Son William Brigham one piece of land
I Bought of John Matthews dec'd lying on the Northerly side of the Road lead-
ing from my dwelling House to the old malt House containing about two acres
be the same more or less Bounded westerly by my own Land, Southerly
by said Road and every other way by his own Land, with one quarter part
of my wearing apparel which with what he has already rec'd shall be
his full share out of my Estate.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Eunice the wife of Hezekiah
Newton Ten Shillings lawful money to be paid by my Executor
which with what she has already rec'd shall be her part in full.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Elizabeth Fay Twenty Shillings
lawful money to be paid by my Executor, which with what she has already
rec'd shall be her full share out of my Estate.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Daughter Hepzibah Taplin six pounds
lawful money to be paid by my Executor which with what she has already
rec'd shall be her full share out of my Estate.

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Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Grand Daughter Persis the wife of
Ithamar Biglow Six Shillings Lawful Money to be paid her by
my Executor which with what she has already had out of my
Estate shall be her part in full.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Grand Daughter Patty the wife
of Hezekiah Fay jun'r one Feather Bed and Beding, one Chest with
Drawers and Round Table Six Black Chairs with one third part
of my Pewter, one Iron pot, one Brass Kittle midde Size, one pair
of Hand Irons, one pair of Fire Tongs and Peal, one Tramel, one
Linnen Wheel, one Woollen Wheel, and one Small looking Glass all
which shall be her full share or portion out of my Estate.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Grandson Nathan Taplin one good Cow
to be delivered to him by my Executor which shall be his full share out
of my Estate.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Grand Son Elisha Taplin one pair of
yearling Steers which shall be his full part out of my Estate and to be 
delivered to him by my Executor.

Item.  I give and Bequeath to my Son Elijah Brigham all the residue of
my Lands and Buildings that I shall ^die^ Seized of lying in the Town of
Southborough ????? ???? ?????????? ???? ??? ????? Residue of my
Personal Estate of every Name or Denomination whatsoever also my
Pew in the Meeting House and one Quarter part of my wearing apparel
with my great Bible, and all other of my Estate that can or may be
found after my decease and not already disposed of by this Will,
to be to him and his Heirs and assigns forever, accept the rest of my
Books which are equally to be divided among my Children.

Lastly I do hereby Constitute make and Ordain my Son Elijah Brigham
the Sole Executor of this my last Will and Testament Ratifying & Confirming
this and no other to be my last Will and Testament and I do hereby utterly
Disallow and Revoke all other Wills and Bequests by me made and
Executors by me appointed and in Confirmation of this and no other
I  have hereunto set my Hand and Seal the day and year first written.
                                                                        Nathan Brigham
Signed Sealed published & pronounced
and declared by the Testator to be his
last Will and Testament in presence
of us.
   Luther Newton
   Erasmus Ward   sworn   }     Bond
   Solomon Ward   sworn  }    Approved by the Hon'd Judge of Probate

The source citation for this probate case file is:

Worcester County, Massachusetts, Probate case files, Packet #7,414, Nathan Brigham of Southborough, 1784 (11 images); "Worcester County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1732-1881," indexed database and digital images, New England Historical and Genealogical Society, American Ancestors  (https://www.AmericanAncestors.org : accessed 3 May 2020); Original records in Worcester County, Massachusetts Probate Court Records, Worcester, Massachusetts.

There is a Bond document for 2000 pounds dated 2 November 1784, a statement of acceptance by the widow and approval by the judge on 2 November 1784 in the probate file.  There is no inventory or account in the probate file.

Nathan Brigham (1693-1784) married (1) Dinah Rice (1693-1725) in 1717 in Marlborough, Massachusetts.  They had five children:

*  Dinah Brigham (1719-1784), married 1743 Jonathan Witt (1718-????).
*  Eunice Brigham (1721-1792), married 1742 Hezekiah Newton (1719-1786).
*  Moses Brigham (1723-1769), married 1749 Mehitable Grout (1726-1795).
*  Perses Brigham (1724-1740).
*  Elizabeth Brigham (1725-????), married 1749 Jedidiah Fay (1726-1799).

Nathan Brigham married (2) 1729 Hepsibah Ward (1708-1748) and they had eight children:

*  Nathan Brigham (1730-1806), married 1769 Mary Hudson (1737-????).
*  Hepsibah Brigham (1732-1815), married 1748 John Taplin (1727-1803).
*  Edmund Brigham (1733-1806), married 1769 Elizabeth Bevel (1740-1825).
*  William Brigham (1735-1793), married 1759 Rebecca Ball (171739-1768).
*  Phenihas Brigham (1737-1740).
*  Tabitha Brigham (1738-1740).
*  Ebenezer Brigham (1741-1756).
*  Elijah Brigham (1742-1804), married 1768 Ruth Taylor (1747-1831)

Nathan Brigham married (3) 1751 Martha Gleason (1710-after 1784), no known children.

Nathan and Dinah (Rice) Brigham are my probable 6th great-grandparents.  I descend through their son, Moses Brigham (1723-1769), who married Mehitable Grout (1726-1795) in 1749 in Westborough, Massachusetts.

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NOTE:  Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Sunday, May 24, 2020

Best of the Genea-Blogs - Week of 17 to 23 May 2020

Dozens of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.

My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.


Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


How Much DNA Did I Inherit From Grandma? by Paul Woodbury on Genealogenes.

The General Society by Jeff Record on Vita Brevis.

Pandemic Decluttering and an Heirloom Book by Jacquie Schattner on Seeds to Tree.

Here's Why I Will No Longer Speak "in-Person" at Genealogy Events ... by Thomas MacEntee on High Definition Genealogy.

Myrt's Got CC  by Pat Richley-Erickson on DearMYRTLE's Genealogy Blog.

10 Ways I Wish I Had Organized My Research Library by Roberta Estes on DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy.

The A-Files: A Rich Source Of Information by Marisa Louie Lee on the California Genealogical Society and Library Blog.

When You Can't Find the Record ... by Donna Moughty on Irish Family Roots.

Mayflower 400 Leiden Virtual Tour Part 1, Part 2, Part 3 by June Butka on Dame Gussie's Genealogy.

Giving It Away by Judy G. Russell on The Legal Genealogist.

Your House Has a Family History Too: 4 Ways to Research It by Linda Stufflebean on Empty Branches on the Family Tree.

*  Some Very Special Volunteers You Probably Never Knew About, But You Might Have Benefitted From Their Work And Not Even Known It by John D. Tew on Filiopietism Prism.

How to Join a Lineage Society + 6 tips for a Successful Application by Elizabeth O'Neal on Heart of the Family.

Connections in Quarantine by Sam Williams on The Orthodox Genealogist.

The New GMP Feature That's A Game-Changer by Jennifer Dondero on The Occasional Genealogist.

How Accurate Are Online Family Trees? by James Tanner on Genealogy's Star.

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

 Friday's Family History Finds  by Linda Stufflebean on Empty Branches on the Family Tree.

 Friday Fossicking, 22nd May 2020 by Crissouli on That Moment in Time.

This Week's Creme de la Creme -- May 23, 2020  by Gail Dever on Genealogy a la Carte,

 Saturday Serendipity (May 23, 2020) by John D. Tew on Filiopietism Prism.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and  read their articles, and add the blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.


Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I currently am reading posts from over 900 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


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The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2020/05/best-of-genea-blogs-week-of-17-to-23.html

Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Saturday, May 23, 2020

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Share a Childhood Memory

It's Saturday Night - 

time for more Genealogy Fun! 


Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible music here) is to:

1)  Have you written your memoirs yet?  If so, please share with us one story from your childhood.  If not, then start your memoirs!   The story could be a memory of your family life, your schoolwork, your neighborhood, etc.  It doesn't have to be a certain length - just something you recall.

2)  Tell us about it in your own blog post, in a comment to this blog post, or in a post on Facebook.  Be sure to leave a link to your work as a Comment to this post..

Here's mine:

The Paper Route and the Flexies

As a teenager (aged 12 to 16, as I recall), I shared a newspaper route with my brother Stan to earn money. The “San Diego Independent” was a twice a week paper, mostly advertisements and local news. Our route was between Fern Street (east) and 28th Street (west), Fir Street (north) to Date Street (south). Fir Street was three blocks down from our house on 30th Street between Hawthorn and Ivy Streets.  We delivered early in the morning.

Here is a map of our neighborhood in San Diego, with our house at the star and the paper route outlined in red.

The only customer that I remember was old Mr. Stotler, who lived on Dale Street north of Elm in an apartment house. He would give us extra money if we would learn something new – the state capitals, major league baseball team cities and names, National Parks, the alphabet backwards, etc. When we were collecting at the end of the month, he usually had some cronies playing cards with him, and he would have us show off.  I can still impress my kids and grandchildren by saying the alphabet backwards very fast.  We delivered the folded newspapers on our Flexies, carrying them in boxes and throwing them onto the porches.  We weren't allowed to use bicycles to deliver this paper.  We delivered over 100 papers twice a week, but only about 30 paid for it when we went collecting.  


The Flexie (essentially a sled on wheels – low to the ground, steered by handlebars with springs, with hand brakes) was a great transportation device for us, but it was dangerous because it was nearly invisible to drivers. We would go off a curb at a corner, swerve out into the street, and go up the first driveway on the next block. 

One day, while going down 30th Street to the nickel-and-dime store on Beech Street, I went off the curb at Date Street, swerved out in the street, looked behind me, and saw a city bus bearing down about 5 feet behind me. Oops. I crashed on the curb, flipped off the flexie, hit my head, and suffered a concussion.  I woke up at home with a bad headache and the doctor hovering over me.  

Stan also had a close call on his flexie – going down Ivy Street from 29th Street to the park, which is a great downhill ride that ends in a cul-de-sac with a concrete barrier at the bottom of the hill. He didn’t make the curve at the end of the hill, hit the curb, and flew off through the concrete barrier (which had an opening in it) and landed on the hillside below.  

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Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Added and Updated Ancestry.com Record Collections - Week of 17 to 23 May 2020

The following record collections were listed on the Ancestry Card Catalog list on Ancestry.com during the period from 17 to 23 May 2020:  

The ADDED and Updated record collections are:

U.S., World War II Draft Registration Cards, 1942; indexed database with record images, Updated 5/22/2020

U.S. WWII Draft Cards Young Men, 1940-1947; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/21/2020

Wyoming, Military Service and Veterans Records, 1914-1946; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/21/2020

U.S. Veterans' Gravesites, ca.1775-2019; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/21/2020

New Hampshire, Civil War Service and Pension Records, 1861-1866; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/21/2020

U.S. Navy Muster Rolls, 1949-1971; indexed database with record images, Updated 5/21/2020

North Carolina, Discharge and Statement of Service Records, 1940-1948; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/21/2020

North Carolina, County Records, 1833-1970; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/21/2020

South Carolina, Confederate Home Records, 1909-1958; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/21/2020

American Protective League Correspondence, 1917-1919; indexed database with record images, Updated 5/21/2020

Italy, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Global, Find A Grave Index for Burials at Sea and other Select Burial Locations, 1300s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Maine, Marriage Records, 1713-1922; indexed database with record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Germany, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Mexico, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Norway, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Sweden, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

* Brazil, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Canada, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020
\
U.S., Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Australia and New Zealand, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/20/2020

Hawaii, Birth Certificates and Indexes, 1841-1944; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/18/2020

Hawaii, Passport Records, 1849-1900; indexed database with record images, Updated 5/18/2020

Hawaii, Death Certificates and Indexes, 1841-1942; indexed database with record images, ADDED  5/18/2020

Hawaii, Divorce Records, 1848-1892; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/18/2020

Hawaii Voter Records, 1864-1910; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/18/2020

Web: Ireland, Census, 1911; indexed database without record images, Updated 5/18/2020

Hawaii, Marriage Certificates and Indexes, 1841-1944; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/18/2020


Hawaii, Births, Marriages, and Death Cards, 1850-1950; indexed database with record images, ADDED 5/18/2020

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The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at    http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  

By my count, there were 10 NEW collections ADDED this past week, per the list above.  There are now 32,789 collections available as of 23 May, an increase of  12 from last week.  Ancestry probably corrected last week's count.  

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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary all-access subscription from Ancestry.com, for which I am thankful.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.


Copyright (c) 2020, Randall J. Seaver

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