Saturday, June 1, 2019

Photos From Day One at Jamboree 2019

I keep forgetting to take photos of the people I meet and in the exhibit hall, but I have taken some photos.  Here are several from Day One (Friday):

The Legacy Tree Genealogists exhibit is just inside the entrance doors, and I caught Jessica Taylor looking at me:


Family Tree DNA is also just inside the entrance and it was always busy:


The Family Tree Maker exhibit was also busy especially when there were no classes:


The Ancestry.com exhibit was busy too - here is their little theater:


The Ancestry.com little theater from the side view:


That's all I have from Day 1.  I will show Day 2 and Day 3 in separate posts.

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

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Added and Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 26 May to 1 June 2019

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 1 June 2019, there were 2,489 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 0 from last week):

The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Deleted ---

--- Collections Added   ---

--- Collections Updated ---

--- Collections with new images ---

*  BillionGraves Index     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2026973); 28,094,312 indexed records with 28,094,312 record images (was 27,567,947 records with 27,567,947 images),  30 Apr 2019

--- Collections with images removed ---

--- Collections with new records ---

England, Herefordshire Bishop's Transcripts, 1583-1898  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3155913); 444,199 indexed records with 23,616 record images (was 383,664 records with 23,616 images),  2 Feb 2019

Peru, Ɓncash, Civil Registration, 1888-2005     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2114425); 934,922 indexed records with 903,067 record images (was 824,466 records with 903,067 images),  17 May 2019

Pennsylvania, Berks County, Reading, Charles Evans Cemetery and Crematory Burial Records, 1887-1979     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3241365); 49,405 indexed records with 16,764 record images (was 28,855 records with 16,764 images),  20 May 2019

United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2061540); 52,238 indexed records with 707,724 record images (was 46,053 records with 707,724 images),  23 Apr 2019

Nova Scotia Births, 1864-1877   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2243378); 107,310 indexed records with 35,026 record images (was 81,259 records with 35,026 images),  26 Jun 2015

Nicaragua Civil Registration, 1809-2013 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1601210); 1,770,428 indexed records with 2,591,542 record images (was 1,711,162 records with 2,591,542 images),  18 Jan 2019

Virginia, Danville City Cemetery Records, 1833-2006     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1386587); 59,462 indexed records with 4,093 record images (was 4 records with 4,093 images),  16 May 2011

Peru, Cemetery Records, 1912-2013       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3163400); 33,541 indexed records with 1,365 record images (was 32,154 records with 1,365 images),  22 Apr 2019

Philippines Civil Registration (National), 1945-1984    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1852584); 570,059 indexed records with 20,274,621 record images (was 565,896 records with 20,274,621 images),  15 May 2019

Brazil, Minas Gerais, Belo Horizonte, Cemetery Records, 1897-2012       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2137269); 90,429 indexed records with 150,972 record images (was 90,425 records with 150,972 images),  6 Dec 2013

Nova Scotia Marriages, 1864-1918        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2242886); 2,139 indexed records with 21,950 record images (was 0 records with 21,950 images),  26 Jun 2015

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In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. "church england") to find collections with those keywords.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

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Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Genealogy Research Trip

It's Saturday Night - 

time for more Genealogy Fun! 



Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:


1)  Have you taken a genealogy research trip and/or vacation to see relatives, research in repositories, walk the ancestral property, etc.?

2)  Tell us about it in a blog post of your own, in a comment to this blog post, or in a comment on Facebook.

Here's mine:

In May of 2004,  Linda and I had a two week vacation to the Northeast.  We flew into Baltimore, and drove to Easton, Pennsylvania to attend my cousin's 50th anniversary party there, and then we stopped in Newton, New Jersey to do research there; we visited Cooperstown, New York to visit the Baseball Hall of Fame;  then it was onward to Watertown, New York to visit the Watertown area libraries and visit the Ranslow Smith homestead in Henderson; then north to Ontario, and along the north shore of Lake Ontario to Toronto and visited the CN Tower; we stayed two nights at Niagara Falls; then south through Buffalo and Erie to Mercer County in Pennsylvania to do Carringer and Feather research; onward to Maryland and DC for sightseeing and a library visit; and back to Baltimore;  all the while doing genealogy along the way. There are 4 blog posts:

I wrote about the trip in 
Pursuing my Elusive Ancestors - Part 1 (posted 12 June 2006).

I wrote about the Newton, New Jersey research in Pursuing my Elusive Ancestors - Part 2 (posted 12 June 2006)


My research in Watertown, New York is posted in Pursuing my Elusive Ancestors - Part 3 (posted 13 June 2006)


The Mercer County, Pennsylvania research is posted in Pursuing my Elusive Ancestors - Part 4 (end) (posted 13 June 2006).



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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

My Day 1 at SCGS Genealogy Jamboree 2019

This was a fairly full first day at the Genealogy Jamboree 2019 in Burbank, California.  I didn't sleep well on Thursday night - acid reflux for four hours and then I got four hours of sleep.  [TMI?]  At least I didn't have to drive!

*  We went down to the breakfast bar in the hotel at 7:30 a.m. for breakfast, and I walked over to the Pavilion for the 8:30 segment of the Genealogy World Round Tables.  I participated in the New England and French Canada table - it was full.

*  At 9:30 a.m. I headed back to the room to read email and blogs, added to the Best Of post, and noted that 52 Ancestors - Week 280: #473 Mercy (Kelsey) Cutter (1698-1760) of Woodbridge, New Jersey posted.  Wrote the New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 31 May 2019 post.  Rested my eyes for awhile, but didn't nap.

*  We went down at 11:15 a.m. to have lunch out on the area between buildings.  Had a hamburger and chocolate chip cookies in the sun.

*  Timed it just right to get into the Exhibit Hall at noon, and visited some of the regulars that are friends.  Noted that all of the major DNA providers were there, but Findmypast, AmericanAncestors, GenealogyBank, Lisa Louise Cooke were not there (there may be others).  The three biggest areas were for Ancestry.com, MyHeritage and Family Tree Maker, and they all had "little theaters."  I noted that there were several new DNA exhibits - DNA2Tree, DNAgedcom, and several others are new.  There are also several jewelry and T-shirt companies with DNA products.  




*  Went to the Pavilion before 1 p.m. to hear Judy Russell's talk on "Death by Undue Means: Coroner's Records."  Had a good talk while waiting with Emily Aulicino and Tracey Berry (?) about DNA and genealogy.  Enjoyed Judy's talk - she always has excellent examples! - but was really sleepy and probably dozed off for a minute or two.

*  After Judy's talk, I decided it was nap time so I went back to the room for a 20 minute snooze interrupted by the maid who didn't clean the room.  

*  Went down to the exhibit hall at 2:40 p.m. and walked around - had a great conversation with Paul Woodbury and John ??? of Legacy Tree Genealogists (their Books product is wonderful), then with Patti at the Forever exhibit, Michael Provard of FamilySearch, Mike and Amanda at the Geni exhibit, Schelly and Daniel at the MyHeritage exhibit, and Gena and Ed at the Moorshead Magazine exhibit. 

*  Joined the "Meet the DNA Experts" panel in the Pavilion in progress but didn't learn much - there were five panelists - Brad, Kitty Cooper, Tim Jansen, Angie Bush and Dave Dowell on the panel moderated by Alice Fairhurst.  

*  Went back into the Exhibit Hall and talked to Geoff and Peggy at the Legacy Family Tree exhibit, and Anna at the Ancestry exhibit.  Had a long discussion and demonstration of RootsMagic 8 with Bruce Buzbee.  There will be many changes to the user interface but not the features in RootsMagic 8 relative to RootsMagic 7.  RM8 should be out this year.

*  I was late back to the room at 5:30 p.m.  and we went to dinner at Don Cuco's in Burbank.  Bleh.  We were back to the hotel by 7:30 p.m.  

*  In the room, I finished up the Genealogy News Bytes - 31 May 2019 post and wrote this post.  Still have more to do tonight.  

So I went to three of the seven scheduled presentation times and was able to make useful contacts in the exhibit hall.  In addition, I met several Genea-Musings readers and briefly talked to a number of friends in the hallways, eating area, and exhibit hall (including Andy and Devon Lee, Diane Hall, Debbie Warner, Pam Paxton, Blaine Bettinger, Denise Levenick, Cyndi Ingle, Drew Smith, Michael Lacopo, Peggy Lauritzen, and Judy Russell).


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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, May 31, 2019

Genealogy News Bytes - 31 May 2019



3)  Genealogy Education - Webinars:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar


Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for June 2019

*  Upcoming Legacy Tree Genealogists Webinar - Friday, 31 May, 7 p.m. PDT: Free Virtual Q&A - Your Genetic Genealogy Questions, Answered!, by Paul Woodbury

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Tools for Translating and Transcribing Genealogy Records, by Thomas MacEntee


*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Misbegotten Children: Tracing the Family Lines of the Illegitimate, by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen


4)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast: #75: Sorting Things Out


*  The Photo Detective Podcast:  Episode 41: Revolution Place: Where Kids Learn History

*  Ancestral Findings Podcast:  AF-253 | Silicon Valley Has its Eyes on Owning Our Genealogy. Why?

*  Ancestral Findings Podcast:  AF-254 | The Connecticut Witch Trials: Witch Hysteria in America Long Before Salem

5)  Genealogy Videos:

6)  Genealogy Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, May 31,  2019


8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 28 May 2019?


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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 31 May 2019

I received this information from Findmypast today:

                          ===================================================



New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

There are more than 3.6 million new records and newspapers available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:
Explore your Scottish ancestry with over 39,000 death and burial records from Dumfriesshire. Many of the burial records include additional details about your ancestor such as, their last address, parents' names and birth date.
Transcripts were created by the Dumfries & Galloway Family History Society. Some records will also include additional notes which may provide you with your ancestor's address, birth place, birth date, parents' names, and possibly more.
Discover whether your mining ancestor was involved in a mining accident in Pennsylvania. Within this collection of more than 163,000 records, you will find large numbers of immigrants which is indicated by their nationality along with vital information about the accident itself and whether it was fatal.
The records are from the Department of Mines and Mineral Industries documenting mine accidents for the anthracite districts and the bituminous districts between 1899 and 1972. They are held by the Pennsylvania State Archives and links to the PDF versions of the accident registers are available on the transcripts. The records explain where the accident happened, the cause, whether the accident was or was not fatal, and who was at fault. A few examples of the accidents include caught in a conveyor belt, runaway trip wrecked into an empty trip, crushed with a possible fracture of the leg, fallen roof, and falling coal.
Over 74,000 additional records from across 45 parishes have been added to our collection of Cardiganshire Baptisms.
Baptism records state the date and place an individual was baptised into a church, and are an essential part of researching your family history. In most records, the parents of the individual being baptised are included, and these are often the key to finding out the names of the previous generation. Children were generally baptized within a few weeks of birth.
Over 65,000 additional records from across 45 parishes have been added to our collection of Cardiganshire Marriages and Banns.
An ancient legal tradition, banns are an announcement in church of a couple's intention to marry. The reading of the banns provides an opportunity for anybody to put forward a reason why the marriage may not lawfully take place. Marriage records are an essential part of researching your family history. There are records where the parents of the bride and groom are listed, and these are often the key to finding out the names of the generation before. Occasionally, ages of the couple may be listed as "full" or "of age" rather than as a figure.
Over 81,000 additional records from across 45 parishes have been added to our collection of Cardiganshire Marriages and Banns.
The records may reveal your relative's birth year, death year, and burial place. Details such as names of their husband or parents may help to fill in more branches of your family tree.
Celebrate Italy's Festival of the Republic on June 2nd by unearthing your Italian roots. Three indexes containing over 3.1 million births, marriages and deaths are now available to search and explore on Findmypast. These indexes span the years 1806 to 1900 and will generate hints against your Findmypast family tree.
Sourced from the International Genealogical Index, these records span the years 1806 to 1900 and will generate hints against your Findmypast family tree.
This week we have added 95,674 pages to our collection of historical British & Irish Newspapers. We are delighted to have two brand new titles joining us this week – West Midlands title the Sandwell Evening Mail and Field, which describes itself as 'the country gentleman's newspaper.'
We are also pleased to welcome updates to eleven of our existing titles, with updates to five of our Irish titles, as well as titles from Berkshire, Buckinghamshire, Nottinghamshire, Warwickshire and London. Details of these updates are included at the end of this blog post.
·        Reading Evening Post - 1985, 1991-1992
·        Buckinghamshire Examiner - 1982, 1985
·        Hammersmith & Shepherds Bush Gazette - 1992, 1999
·        Mansfield & Sutton Recorder - 1990, 1992, 1999
·        Sunday Independent (Dublin) - 1959, 1974
·        New Ross Standard - 1987
·        Middlesex County Times - 1937
·        Rugby Advertiser - 1897, 1912-1913
·        Kerryman - 1992
·        Drogheda Independent - 2003-2004

·        Irish Independent - 1987
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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.
Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 280: #473 Mercy (Kelsey) Cutter (1698-1760) of Woodbridge, New Jersey

Mercy Kelsey (1698-1760)   is #473 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married  #472 Richard Cutter (1682-1756) in about 1722 in Woodbridge, New Jersey.

I am descended through:

*  their son, #236 William Cutter (1722-1788), married #237 Mary Kent (1726-????) in about 1744.
*  their son, #118 Stephen Cutter (1745-1823), married #119 Tabitha Randolph (1752-1841) in about 1769.
*  their daughter #59 Sarah Cutter (1785-1878), married #58 William Knapp (1775-1856) in about 1804.
*  their daughter, #29 Sarah Knapp (1818-1904), married #28 David Auble (1817-1894)  in 1844.
*  their son #14 Charles Auble (1849-1916), married #15 Georgianna Kemp (1868-1952) in 1898.
*  their daughter #7 Emily Kemp Auble (1899-1977), married #6 Lyle Lawrence Carringer (1891-1976) in 1918.
*  their daughter #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) who married #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Name:                          Mercy Kelsey[1–2]    
*  Alternate Name:          Mercy Cutter[3-6]   
*  Alternate Name:          Mercy Kelsey Cutter[7]  

*  Sex:                             Female    

*  Father:                        Joseph Kelsey (1673-1742)    
*  Mother:                      Joannes "Jane" DeCamp (1677-1739)  

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
*  Birth:                           about 1698, Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, United States[1]    

*  Distribution :               1 July 1742 (about age 44), father's will proved; Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, United States[2-3]    
*  Distribution:                27 November 1753 (about age 55), brother's will proved; Elizabeth, Union, New Jersey, United States[4]    
*  Distribution:                22 January 1757 (about age 59), husband's will proved; Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[5]    

*  Will:                             28 November 1759 (about age 61), will written; Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[6]    

*  Death:                          before 28 May 1760 (before about age 62), Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[7]    
*  Burial:                         after 28 May 1760 (after about age 62), First Presbyterian Churchyard, Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[7]  

*  Probate:                      28 May 1760, will provedwritten; Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[6]    

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):



*  Spouse 1:               Richard Cutter (1682-1756)    
*  Marriage 1:            about 1722 (about age 40), probably Woodbridge, Middlesex, New Jersey, United States[1]    
*  Child 9:                  William Cutter (1722-1780)    
*  Child 10:                Joseph Cutter (1725-1767)    
*  Child 11:                Mary Cutter (1728-    )    
*  Child 12:                Rebecca Cutter (1730-    )    
*  Child 13:                Ebenezer Cutter (1732-    )    
*  Child 14:                Samuel Cutter (1734-1759)  

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):  

Information about the Cutter family was obtained from History of the Cutter Family of New England, by Dr. Benjamin Cutter, published Boston, 1871[1].

Information about the Kelsey family was obtained from A Genealogy of the Descendants of William Kelsey, by Edward A. claypool and Azalea Cizbee, published in 1928[2].

Mercy Kelsey was born in about 1698 in Elizabeth, New Jersey, the first child of Joseph Kelsey and Joannes DeCamp of Elizabeth[2]

She married Richard Cutter, son of William and Rebecca (Rolfe) Cutter in about 1722 in Woodbridge, as his second wife[1].  They had six children between 1722 and about 1734, all probably born in Woodbridge[1]:

*  William Cutter (1722-1780), married Mary Kent in about 1744.
*  Joseph Cutter (1725-1767), married Ann Campyon before 1752.
*  Mary Cutter (1728-????), married Baker.
*  Rebecca Cutter (1730-????)
*  Ebenezer Cutter (1732-????)
*  Samuel Cutter (1734-1759)

Marcy Cutter is mentioned as a daughter in her father's will, dated 13 February 1739, and proved 1 July 1742, abstracted in the New Jersey Calendar of Wills, Vol. XXX, page 279[3].  

Mercy Cutter is mentioned in her brother Joseph Kelsey's will, dated 24 April 1752, and proved 27 November 1753, abstracted in the New Jersey Calendar of Wills, Volume XXXII, page 184[4].  It calls her "sister Marcey Cutter."

"1752, Apr. 24. Keley (Kelsey), Joseph, of the Borough of Elisabeth, Essex Co., yeoman, will of.  Brothers -- Benjamin Kelsey and Daniel Kelsey, who has daughters Maney and Ruth, both under 18. Mentions cousin Lowrance Decamp, Hannah and Mary, daughters of sister Mary Oliver, dec'd. children of sister Ruth, dec'd, wife of Benjamine Elstone; children of dec'd sister, Phebe Wood; children of sister, Elydia Winans; also sisters Marcey Cutter and Hannah Badgle.  Real and personal property.  Executors -- Joseph Wood, of Middlesex Co., and James Badley, of "Elisabeth Borrow."  Witnesses -- Daniel Cargel, Jeremiah Oliver, Abraham Clark.  Proved Nov. 27, 1753.
Lib. F, p. 147"

In husband Richard Cutter's will dated 20 September 1756 and proved 22 January 1757, he bequeathed to his wife Mercy Cutter[5]:

" I Give & bequeath to my well beloved Wife Mercy Cutter the one equal third part of all the Neat profit & Income of both my Grist Mill and Sawmill which she shall have & enjoy for & during her natural life also I Give to my said Wife the one half part of the priviledge use & benefit of my former Dwelling House at the Cornfield Landing her part to be taken where she shall chuse and also the use & benefit of the one half part of the Lands & Meadows lying & adjoyning on the Northerly side of the said Dwelling House & on the North side of the said Dwelling House & on the North side of the Road that goes by the same Bounded Westerly by the Lands herein after given to my Son Richard Cutter Northerly by Zebulon Pike's Land Easterly in part by Will'm Cutter's Land and partly by the great Creek including the Islands & Meadow lying Northerly of Bradly's Creek which moiety shall remain to my said wife during her natural life. Also I Give & bequeath to my Wife aboves'd One Feather Bed & sufficient furniture & also the Sum or value of fifty pounds of curr't money of this Province to be taken out of my Moveable Estate in such particular things as my wife shall chuse & being by her chosen they shall be Prized and Delivered to her by my Executors and shall remain to her her Heirs & assigns for ever."

Mercy (Kelsey) Cutter died after 13 November 1759 when she wrote her will, and before 28 May 1760 when her will was proved in the Middlesex County probate court[6].  The will reads:

 "In the name of God Amen, the thirteenth day of November in the year of our Lord one thousand seven hundred and fifty nine I Mercy Cutter of Woodbridge in the county of Middlesex and province of New Jersey being of perfect mind and memory and calling unto mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men and women once to dye, do make and ordain this my last will and testament and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I do give and dispose of the same in the following manner and form. 

"Imprimis it is my will and I do give order all my estate to be valued and appraised by two honest neighbours such as my executors hereafter named shall chuse and also sell the same if my said executors shall so chuse and cannot otherways agree. And I do order my said executors in the first place to pay all my just debts and funeral charges out of my estate and the remainder of my estate I do give and dispose of as followeth. 

"Item I give to my son William Cutter the sum of five shillings. 

"Item I give to my daughter Rebeccah Frazee the sum of twenty pounds. 

"Item I give to my daughter Mary Baker the wife of Jacob Baker the sum of five pounds, all which shall be paid to them at one year after my decease. I also give to my granddaughter Mercy Cutter the sum of five pounds. 

"Item I give to my grandson Kelsey Cutter the sum of five pounds. I give to my granddaughter Mercy Baker the sum of five pounds, to be paid to them when they come of age, and all the several sums or legacies which I have herein given is meant and intended by me to be current money of New Jersey at eight shillings the ounce. 

*  Item I give one half of the remainder of my estate to my son Ebenezar Cutter. 

"Item I give the other half of the said remainder of my estate unto my grandson John Baker and to my granddaughter Mercy Baker to be equally divided between them and to be paid to them when they come of age. 

"And I do hereby constitute make and ordain my son Ebenezar Cutter and my daughter Rebeccah Frazee my executor and executrix of this my last will and testament and do hereby utterly disallow revoke and disannull all and every other former wills legacies and executors by me in any ways before this time named willed and bequeathed ratifying and confirming this and no other to be my last will and testament. In wittness whereof I have hereunto sett my hand and seal the day and year above written. 

"Signed sealed and delivered by the said Mercy               }            her
Cutter to be her last will & testament in the presence of  } Mercy M Cutter {LS}
Francis Campyon Joseph Thorne Benjamin Jackson       }          mark"

"Memorandum that on the twenty eighth day of May one thousand seven hundred and sixty, Francis Campyon one of the wittnesses wiithin subscribed evidences appeared before me John Smyth duly authorised &c And he being duely sworn on the Holy Evangelists on his oath declares that he did see Mercy Cutter the testator within named sign and seal the written instrument and heard her publish pronounce and declare the same to be her last will and testament, that at the doing thereof she was of sound mind and memory to the best of the deponent's knowledge and as he verily believes and that at the same time Joseph Thorn and Benjamin Jackson the other evidences were also present and signed as evidences as he the deponant did in the testatrix's presence.       
                                                             John Smyth

"Also that at the same time Ebenezar Cutter one of the executors in the with-in will named came before me and was duely qualifyed by takeing the oath of an executor as appointed by law.                                                                     John Smyth

"Probat granted by Gov'r Bernard &c (in the usual form &c) dated the same twenty eighth day of May 1760.                                             Chas Read Reg'r

"Examined and agrees with the original, the word (wittnesses) obliterated in the proof was by mistake in recording .                               Smyth Reg'r"

Mercy (Kelsey) Cutter was buried in the First Presbyterian Church graveyard, but no stone or inscription survives[7]

5.  SOURCES

1. Edward A. Claypool and Azalea Clizbee, A Genealogy of the Descendants of William Kelsey (Sanford, N.C. : n.p., 1928), pages 65-67, Joseph Kelsey sketch.

2. Dr. Benjamin Cutter, The History of the Cutter Family of New England  (Boston, Mass. : 1871), pages 39-41, Richard Cutter sketch.

3. A. Van Doren Honeyman, editor,, Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey: First Series -- Volume XXX: Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, etc., Volume III -- 1730-1750 (Somerville, N.J.: The Unionist Gazette Association, Printers, 1918), page 279, Joseph Kellsey Sr. will entry.

4. A. Van Doren Honeyman (editor), Documents Relating to the Colonial History of the State of New Jersey, First Series, Vol. XXXII; Calendar of New Jersey Wills, Administrations, etc. Volume IV, 1751-1760 (Somerville, N.J. : Unionist-Gazette Association, Printers, 1928), page 184, Joseph Kelsey will abstract.

5. New Jersey, Wills and Probate Records, 1656-1999, indexed database with digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 September 2015, no longer available), Middlesex County, Wills, Liber F, pages 397-402 (images 538-541), Richard Cutter will papers, 1756; citing original data from New Jersey County, District and Probate Courts.

6. New Jersey, Wills and Probate Records, 1656-1999, indexed database with digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 September 2015, images no longer available)), New Jersey Surrogate's Court, Middlesex County, Wills, Liber H, pages 74-75 (image 311), Mercy Cutter will, 1759; citing original data from New Jersey County, District and Probate Courts.

7. Find A Grave, indexed database and digital image,  (http://www.findagrave.com), First Presbyterian Churchyard, Woodbridge, N.J., Mercy Kelsey Cutter memorial #114269710.

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NOTE:  In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2019 to 312 Ancestors in 312 Weeks.


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

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