Saturday, October 6, 2018

Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 30 September to 6 October 2018

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at   FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 6 October 2018, there were 2,380 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 3 from last week):

The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Added   ---

Georgia, World War I, Statement of Service Cards, ca. 1920-1929 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3010041); 102,472 indexed records with 102,472 record images, ADDED 4 Oct 2018

South Africa, Transvaal, Civil Marriage, 1870-1930      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2727134); 241,425 indexed records with 241,425 record images, ADDED 3 Oct 2018

Hawaii, Kauai County, Obituaries, 1982-2010     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2495093); 108,056 indexed records with 108,056 record images, ADDED 3 Oct 2018

--- Collections Updated ---

South Africa, Cape Province, Probate Records of the Master of the High Court, 1834-1989 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2517051); 1,475,888 indexed records with 1,167,010 record images (was 1,475,888 records with 1,167,010 images), Updated 1 Oct 2018

United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,168,489 indexed records with 46,885,712 record images (was 34,168,489 records with 46,885,712 images), Updated 5 Oct 2018

Belgium, East Flanders, Civil Registration, 1541-1914   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2138513); 465,376 indexed records with 2,948,225 record images (was 454,358 records with 2,948,225 images), Updated 2 Oct 2018

United States Mexican War Pension Index, 1887-1926      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1979390); 51,641 indexed records with 51,991 record images (was 51,647 records with 51,991 images), Updated 3 Oct 2018

Sweden, Household Examination Books, 1880-1930  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2790465); 46,977,151 indexed records with 87,177 record images (was 46,977,151 records with 87,177 images), Updated 3 Oct 2018

Canada Census, 1871     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1551612); Index only (3,519,941 records), no images (was 3,519,941 records with 0 images), Updated 2 Oct 2018

Canada Census, 1881     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1804541); 4,281,160 indexed records with 88,543 record images (was 4,281,160 records with 88,543 images), Updated 5 Oct 2018

New York, County Naturalization Records, 1791-1980      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1999177); 672,824 indexed records with 3,080,948 record images (was 541,771 records with 3,080,948 images), Updated 4 Oct 2018

Australia, Tasmania, Civil Registration, 1803-1933      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2125029); 425,774 indexed records with 73,580 record images (was 425,774 records with 73,580 images), Updated 4 Oct 2018

--- Collections with new images ---

Virginia, Petersburg, Gillfield Baptist Church Record, 1827-1906        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2842085); 15,162 indexed records with 546 record images (was 15,162 records with 0 images),  19 Sep 2018

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In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. "church england") to find collections with those keywords.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- 20 More Questions

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It's Saturday Night again - 

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  Ellen Thompson-Jennings wrote 
20 More Questions About Your Ancestors and Maybe A Few About You this week and Linda Stufflebean thought it would be a great SNGF challenge.  I agree!

2)  Copy the questions from Ellen's post or from my post below, and insert your own replies.  Be sure to comment on Ellen's blog so she knows you wrote about it.


3)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a comment on this post with a link to your post.

Thank you to Ellen for her post and to to Linda Sufflebean for suggesting this topic.  If you have an idea for an SNGF topic, please let me know.  


Q1:   Why do you love doing genealogy/family history?
A1:  The hunt.  The challenge.  I love solving problems.  My ancestry is unique

Q2:  How far have you traveled to research an ancestor?
A2:  Norway and England.  Mine in England, Linda's in Norway, in the Voss area.   

Q3:  What do you think your favorite ancestor would think of our lives today?
A3:  My favorite ancestor is Devier J. Lamphear Smith (1839-1894).  He was a livery man, horse trader, land speculator, and inventor.  I think he would be amazed by the science and engineering feats that have created the fields of transportation, communications, health and education.

Q4:  What do you think that your ancestor would like/dislike?
A4:  I think he would love the health care, and would dislike the ostentatious wealth of the elites.

Q5:  What was the most unusual cause of death that you’ve found?
A5:  2nd great-grandfather Henry White (1824-1885) died of locomotor ataxia in Killingly, Connecticut.  His wife, Amy (Oatley) White (1826-1865) died of a strangulated hernia. 

Q6:  Which ancestor had the most unusual occupation?
A6:  In the 1885 Kansas State census, Devier J. Smith (1839-1894) was a "speculator."  I think it was land, but it might have been horses.

Q7:  Have you ever gone to where your ancestor lived and it felt like home even if you’ve never been there before?
A7:  Yes, Leominster, Massachusetts, where my father grew up was like that.  So was Hilperton in Wiltshire where my Richman ancestors came from.

Q8:  Do you have a distant ancestor  (several generations back) that looks like someone in the family?
A8:  Not that I can tell.  

Q9:  What is the oldest ancestral photo that you have?
A9:  The oldest photo is probably the ambrotypes in the Union Case photos of my 2nd great-grandparents Isaac and Lucretia (Smith) Seaver from about 1864.

Q10:  Did you have an ancestor that had an arranged marriage?
A10:  Not that I know of.

Q11:  If you could live in the time period of one of your ancestors what year would it be? Where would it be?
A11:  About 1835 in Sterling, Massachusetts.  I could ask my 3rd great-grandfather Thomas J. Newton where he was born and who his parents were.

Q12:  Which ancestor was married the most times?
A12:  2nd great-grandfather Isaac Seaver (1823-1901) was married three times - to Juliet Glazier in 1846, to Lucretia Smith in 1851, and to Alvina Bradley in 1884.

Q13:  If you’ve tested your DNA what was the biggest ethnicity surprise?
A13:  The 1% of Native American that 23andMe and two others said I have on Chromosome 12.  I think it's from my mother's ancestry.

Q14:  Did you have a female ancestor that was different or unusual from other females from that time period?
A14:  Perhaps Elizabeth Horton Dill (1791-1869), who became a schoolteacher and moved 50 miles or so from Cape Cod to Dedham, Mass.

Q15:  Did your ancestor go through a hardship that you don’t know how they managed?
A15:  I can't imagine how Isaac Seaver (1823-1901) managed losing his father at age 2 and his first wife after a year of marriage and one baby.

Q16:  How often do you research? Are you a genealogy addict?
A16: Every day, almost all day, 8 to 10 hours on average.  Yes, "geneaholic" is my Facebook name.

Q17:  Do you have someone in your family that will take over the family history?
A17:  Not yet.  I'm hoping one or two of the grandchildren will become hooked on it.

Q18:  Have you had a genealogy surprise? What was it?
A18:  That Devier James Lamphear Smith (1839-1894) was adopted as a baby in Jefferson county, New York.

Q19:  Are you a storyteller? What’s your favorite family story?
A19:  Not very good - I get my tangue tongled usually, and go on and on.  My wife is great, though!  My favorite family story is how my life changed with a phone call the Friday before I was going away to a new job.

Q20:  What was your greatest genealogy discovery?
A20:  Early on, it was discovering the Mayflower connections that excited my aunts and uncle and cousins.  

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The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/10/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-20-more.html

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Surname Saturday -- LNU (Mary married Christopher Grant, England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.

I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2167 who is Mary LNU (1612-1692). [Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through one generation in this LNU family line is:

1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

66.  Nathan Gates (1767-1830)
67.  Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)

134.  Jeremiah Knowlton (1745-1785)
135.  Abigail Peirce (1750-1775)

270.  Samuel Peirce (1712-1772)

271.  Abigail Stearns (1715-1798)

540.  John Peirce (1673-1744)
541.  Elizabeth Smith (1674-1747)

1082.  Daniel Smith (1642-1681)
1083.  Mary Grant (1648-1700)


2166.  Christopher Grant, born 1608 in England; died 06 September 1685 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He married before 1635 in probably England.
2167.  Mary LNU, born about 1612 in England; died 19 January 1692 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of Christopher Grant and Mary are:
i. Abigail Grant, born 06 February 1635 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died in  ; married Roger Rose 1661 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born about 1632 in England.
ii. Joshua Grant, born 11 June 1637 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 14 August 1676 in Arrowsic, Sagadahoc, Maine, United States; married Sarah Beckwith about 1670 in New London, Connecticut, United States; born about 1650 in Hartford, Hartford, Connecticut, United States.
iii. Caleb Grant, born 08 September 1639 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 18 November 1694 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; married Mary Christopher before June 1671 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born about 1640 in Connecticut, United States; died 01 February 1683 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
iv. Benjamin Grant, born 06 September 1641 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died about 1670 in Old Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States; married Mary Beckwith 1664 in New London, Connecticut, United States; born 1643 in New London, Connecticut, United States; died 07 February 1693 in Old Lyme, New London, Connecticut, United States.
v. Sarah Grant, born 01 February 1643 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 25 March 1690 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married Samuel Severans 23 February 1666 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; born 19 September 1637 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States; died 1672 in Salisbury, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.
vi. Joseph Grant, born 27 September 1646 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 12 February 1722 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; married Mary Grafton 24 December 1684 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born about 1660 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
vii. Mary Grant, born 22 February 1648 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died Aft. 1700 in Stonington, New London, Connecticut, United States; married Daniel Smith 22 February 1668 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

viii. Christopher Grant, born 1649 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 04 November 1694 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; married Martha Glover about 1684 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born about 1650 in Massachusetts, United States.

I have no information about Mary LNU's maiden name or parentage.

Information about the Grant family was obtained from:

*  
Robert Charles Anderson, George E. Sanborn, Jr., Melinde Lutz Sanborn, The Great Migration, Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635 (Boston Mass. : New England Historic Genealogical Society,2000-2011), Volume 3, Page 129.

I have done no original research for this surname line.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, October 5, 2018

Genealogy News Bytes - 5 October 2018


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


 
New evidence discovered regarding first English voyage to America

*  Norway's petabyte plan: Store everything ever published in a 1,000-year archive

The Genealogical Institute on Federal Records (Gen-Fed) Alumni Association Announces the Richard S. Lackey Scholarship

*  AncestryProGenealogists Scholarship Program now accepting applications!

*  Association of Professional Genealogists Awards Members for Contributions to the Organization and Profession; Announces Golden Chapter Award

Call for Proposals for the 2019 FGS Family History Conference

Dutch Genealogy News for September 2018

2)  New or Updated Record Databases:

*  
New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 5 October 2018

*  Added or Updated Record Collections on MyHeritage - September 2018

*  School Registers released online by TheGenealogist

3)  Genealogy Education:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar


*  Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for October 2018

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar -- Tuesday, 9 October, 11 a.m. PDT:  On the Go: Using Your Mobile Device for Genealogy, by MyHeritage

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Remote Research in the Databases of the Daughters of the American Revolution Genealogical Research System, by Rick Sayre

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Legacy 9 Unlocked (part 7): Adding Email Correspondence, by Geoff Rasmussen

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Jewish Genealogy's Other Side: Sephardic Research, by Schelly Dardashti

*  African Roots Podcast:  Digging the Roots Podcast:  Episode #432 Talking DNA

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast:  #007 – In Researching Your Family Less Is More

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Using Tax Records to Research AROUND The 1890 Census Loss in Genealogy

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube: Using Newspapers to Research AROUND the 1890 Census loss in Genealogy

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Family Roots Conference Recap - Happy Family History Month

*  Ancestry YouTube:  October 2018 Edition | What's New at Ancestry | Ancestry

*  Who Is Nicka Smith? YouTube:  BlackProGen LIVE! Ep 67: Historically Black Schools, Colleges, and Universities

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  FamilySearch Tree Overview (Revised Oct 2018) - Judy Sharp

*  MyHeritage YouTube:  MyHeritage DNA Reveal on Fox and Friends

*  The DIY Genealogist YouTube:  Intro to AncestryDNA

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, October 5,  2018


*  Family History Month: Win a Geni Pro Subscription!

5)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 2 October 2018?

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 5 October 2018

I received this information from Findmypast today:

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New Kent Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday

Explore more than 652,000 brand new records from the English county of Kent this Findmypast Friday, including:

Kent Parish Records Update

Over 515,000 new records have been added to our collections of Kent Parish records, including: 


The new additions consist of transcripts provided by the Kent Family History Society and cover the parishes of Burham, Canterbury, Deal, Dover, Gravesend, Halling, Hawkhurst, Higham, Kilndown, Lydd, Maidstone, New Romney, Tudeley with Capel and Walmer.

The records date from 1538 to 1988. A full list of all the parishes covered by these collections is provided in the Useful links and resources sectionof each search page. Affectionately known as the Garden of England, Kent is an ancient county in the southeast. One of the Home Counties, it borders London, Essex, Surrey, and Sussex, and nominally France, midway through the Channel Tunnel.

Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Registers

Over 35,000 additional records have been added to our collections of Kent, Canterbury Archdeaconry Registers, including:


The new additions cover the parishes of Hythe, Paddlesworth, Sandgate and Westgate on Sea and span the years 1813 to 2001. Each entry includes both a transcript and an image of the original document.

Kent Poor Law Union

Search for your English ancestors in this index of more than 111,000 poor law union records. This index comprises 16 different types of poor law union documents from 24 different unions across the English county of Kent. It was created from original records held by the Kent History and Library Centre.

The collection includes Admission and Discharge Registers, Court of the Guardians records, births, baptisms, deaths, burials, relief Lists and more. Each result will include a transcript of the original source material.

In 1834 parishes were grouped into new local government units known as Poor Law Unions. These unions reported to the newly created Poor Law Commission, later the Poor Law Board, and later again, the Poor Law Department of the Local Government Board, all based in London. Each Poor Law Union was run by a board of guardians elected by ratepayers from their constituent parishes. The day-to-day management of the workhouse was supervised by a workhouse master and matron.

Kent Registers & Records

Explore seven fascinating historical publications to learn more about the history of Kent and the lives of your Kentish ancestors, including;

  • Roffensian Register (King's School, Rochester), 3rd ed, pub 1920 (1835-1920)
  •  Register of St Lawrence College, Ramsgate, 2nd ed, pub 1925 (1879-1924)
  • Parish Registers of Chislet (1538-1707)
  • Kent Records: Parish Registers & Records in the Diocese of Rochester, pub 1912
  • Dwelly's Parish Records, vol 3, pub 1914 - Memorial Inscriptions for Herne, Hoath & Reculver
  • Parish Registers of Rochester Cathedral, pub 1892 (1657-1837)
  • Testamenta Cantiana (Extracts from Kent Wills), 2 vols, pub 1906-07 (1400-1560)

The publications in this collection are presented as a PDF. You can search the publication by name and will be brought to the page on which the name appears. The amount of information you discover about your ancestor will depend on the nature of event that was recorded.

PERiodical Source Index Update

Over 8,000 new articles from more than 60 publications are now available to search. The new additions cover The UK, Ireland, The United States, Canada, New Zealand, Australia and Slovakia.

The PERiodical Source Index (PERSI) enables you to easily locate key information about people and places. It contains millions of entries from thousands of historical, genealogical and ethnic publications, making it an invaluable, comprehensive family history resource. PERSI provides a simple way to access articles, photos, and other material you might not find using traditional search methods. This can help to build the historical context around your personal research, and the world your ancestors lived in.


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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 246: #371 Lydia (Gray) Ladd (1707-????) of Little Compton, Rhode Island

Lydia Gray (1707-????) is #371 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married #370 Joseph Ladd (1701-1748)  in 1731 in Little Compton, Rhode Island.


I am descended through:

*  their daughter, #185 Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814) who married  #184 Benedict Oatley (1732-1821) in 1755. 
*   their son #92 Joseph Oatley (1756 - 1815) who married #93 Mary Hazard (1765-1857)  in 1781.
*  their son #46 Jonathan Oatley (1791-1872), who married #47 Amy Champlin (1798-1865) in 1813.
*  their daughter #23 Amy Oatley (1826-1864), who married  #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) in 1844.
*  their daughter #11 Julia E. White (1848-1913) who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) in 1868.
*  their daughter #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

=====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

 *  Name:                      Lydia Gray[1,3–6]    
*  Alternate Name:       Lydia (Gray) Ladd[2]

*  Sex:                           Female    

*  Father:                      Samuel Gray (1681-1712)    
*  Mother:                    Deborah Church (1676-1772)  

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Birth:                       16 October 1707, Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States[1–2,4]    
*  Distribution:            2 April 1712 (age 4), father's will proved, Bristol, Massachusetts, United States[3]    

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Spouse 1:              Joseph Ladd (1701-1748)    

*  Marriage 1:           25 August 1731 (age 29), Little Compton, Newport, Rhode Island, United States[5,7]    

*  Child 1:               Deborah Ladd (1732-????)    
*  Child 2:               Joseph Ladd (1733-????)    
*  Child 3:               Elizabeth "Betsy" Ladd (1735-1814)    
*  Child 4:               William Ladd (1737-1800)    
*  Child 5:               Lydia Ladd (1740-????)  

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

A book with information about the Samuel Gray family in Little Compton is: Benjamin Franklin Wilbour, Little Compton Families ( Little Compton, R.I.: Little Compton
Historical Society, 1967), page 294, Samuel Gray sketch. Lydia Gray was born 16 October 1707 in Little Compton, Rhode Island, the daughter of Samuel
and Deborah (Church) Gray of Little Compton, as the 5th of seven children[1]. She is listed in the
Little Compton church records, but with only "1707" as the date[4]. However, the full birth date is
provided as Lydia (Gray), wife of Joseph Ladd in the Ladd section of the Little Compton town
records[2]. Lydia's father died 23 March 1712. He wrote a will dated 20 March 1712, which was proved 2
April 1712 in the Bristol County, Massachusetts probate court[3]. In the will, he bequeathed 100
pounds to his daughter Lydia. With five children under age 13, Deborah (Church) Gray married
again to Daniel Throop in 1713 as his third wife, so Lydia grew up in the Throop household.. On 25 August 1731, Lydia Gray married in Little Compton to Joseph Ladd, the son of William and
Elizabeth (Tompkins) Ladd[1,5-6]. They had five children, whose births were recorded in the Little
Compton town records: * Deborah Ladd, born 16 May 1732. * Joseph Ladd, born 18 August 1733. * Elizabeth Ladd, born 9 July 1735, died 27 November 1814, married 2 October 1755 in South Kingstown, R.I. to Benedict Oatloey (1732-1821). * William Ladd, born 16 October 1737, died 4 December 1800, married 22 December 1761 in Newport, Rhode Island to Sarah Gardner (1739-1807). * Lydia Ladd, born September 1740. Joseph Ladd died before March 1748, probably in Little Compton, Rhode Island. It is not known
if Lydia married again. There are no burial records for Joseph Ladd or for Lydia, his wife. There are no probate records
for Lydia (Gray) Ladd in the Little Compton town council records or in the Bristol County,
Massachusetts probate court records. 
 
5)  SOURCES

1. Benjamin Franklin Wilbour, Little Compton Families ( Little Compton, R.I.: Little Compton Historical Society, 1967), page 294, Samuel Gray family sketch.

2. James N. Arnold, Vital Record of Rhode Island, 1636-1850, First Series, Births, Marriages and Deaths : a Family Register for the People. (Providence, R.I.: Narragansett Historical Publishing Co., 1891-1912), Volume IV, Newport County Births, Marriages, Deaths, page 134 (image 501 of 691), Lydia (Gray) Ladd entry.

3. "Probate Records, 1687-1916; Index, 1687-1926" Bristol County, Massachusetts, Probate Court Records, on 199 FHL US/CAN Microfilm rolls; original records at Probate Registry, Taunton, Mass., Volume 3, Pages 88-90, Samuel Gray estate papers, on FHL Microfilm 0,461,882.

4. "Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 26 September 2018), Volume 8, Church Records: Member Lists, Baptisms, Marriages, Deaths, "United Congregational Church - Little Compton," page 15 (image 62 of 679), Lydia Gray birth entry.

5. "Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), Volume 4, Newport County Vital Records, "Little Compton - Intentions and Marriages," page 38 (image 405 of 691), Joseph Ladd and Lydia Gray marriage entry.

6. Warren Ladd, The Ladd Family, A Genealogical and Biographical Memoir (New Bedford, Mass.: Edmund Anthony & Sons, 1890), #3976 Joseph Ladd sketch.

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NOTE:  In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2018 to 260 Ancestors in 260 Weeks.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, October 4, 2018

Photos From CVGS Family History Day on 29 September - Set 1

The Chula Vista Genealogical Society and the Chula Vista Public Library hosted the Third Annual  Family History Day on Saturday, 29 September at the Civic Center Branch Library.

There was a Keynote address on "Overview of Autosomal DNA Testing and Analysis for Genealogy" by Randy Seaver at 10:30 a.m., and a presentation of "This is Your Ancestry, Greg Cox" (a Finding Your Roots type of program) also by Randy for one of the San Diego County Supervisors from Chula Vista.

There were activities for the community at a number of stations in the library, including making a family tree, searching for records on the computer, ask research questions, children's activities, FamilySearch help, genealogy books, and a "Tell a Story" board in the entrance to the library.

I managed to snap some photos with my phone, and several other volunteers took photos and I will share some of them over time.

Here are a few of the photos I took during the day:

1)  There are book stands as you enter the stacks, and they usually have NEW books on them.  On Saturday, all of the stands had genealogy books - many of them recent publications that CVGS bought for the library.  Here is one of the book stands (there were six, I think):


2)  Marcia and Jane were in the Children's Library area, and had all sorts of activities for the kids, including a family tree, bug genetics, writing a story, etc.:


3)  At the entrance to the library, Jane and Ana had constructed a three-panel display with submitted "Story-Photo" for ancestors of our members.  Here is one side of the display:


 4)  Here is the story and picture for my second great-grandfather Devier James Lamphear Smith (1839-1894) on the bottom of the middle panel on the photo above:


5)  Here is the story and picture for my second great-grandfather Isaac Seaver (1823-1901):


More photos to come.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Seavers in the News -- Vernon C. Seaver Almost Got Divorced

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Des Moines [Iowa] Tribune newspaper dated 25 November 1907:

The transcription of the article is:

"AUTO FRIEND DIVORCE COURT
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"'DEVIL IS OFTEN THE CHAUFFEUR' SAYS CHICAGO WOMAN
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"SUED HUSBAND FOR DIVORCE
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'Then withdrew Her Petition and Gave Company of Friends 'Reconciliation Dinner'
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"CHICAGO, Nov. 25. -- Mrs. Vernon C. Seaver believes the man who invented automobiles was a friend of the divorce court lawyers.

"After a 'reconciliation dinner' at which she and Mr. Seaver entertained fifteen of their friends in honor of her withdrawal of the divorce petition she filed in September, she nodded her head approvingly as her husband gravely advised all young married men who are considering the purchase of a motor, 'don't.'

"'The devil is often the chauffeur,' he says.

"In his discourse of 'Automobiles as Rapid Transit to Divorce Courts,' presented his side of the case this way, while Mrs. Seaver listened and smiled approvingly.

"'You see, the first thing all the husband's friends and acquaintances discover is that he has a great big touring car at his disposal, with five seats in the tonneau and two in front.  That looks pretty good to the husband's friends.  His women acquaintances, in particular, are glad.  They jolly him along and get him to take them out on runs here and there, just to see how the new car acts.'

"'And right there is the beginning of the route to the lawyer's office.  I'll bet that the man who invented automobiles had a kind spot in his heart for lawyers.  Automobiles are a wonderful aid to the practice of the legal profession.

"'So the poor husband commences to play host in his car to his feminine friends.  The first thing he knows his enemies are bringing all kinds of yarns back to the family circle, something like this:

"'Your husband was seen dining in a Highland Park hotel last night with six women -- he had a little automobile party on.'

"'Your husband was whirling up Michigan avenue this afternoon with three women and two other men in his new touring car.'

"'Who was the woman I saw using your husband's new automobile yesterday -- I recognized it by the number?'

"'Who are the two blondes, looking like actresses, who were with your husband in his new motor car in Washington park last week?'

"'These are only a few of the bits of news and kinds of inquiries which come filtering back to the wife at home.

"'The husband is put through the third degree and all he can say is:

"'Every one I know or ever heard of is always at me to give them rides in my automobile or are borrowing it from me.  What can I do?  I don't like to offend my friends.  There's no harm doing, I assure you.'

"'But the wife very likely doesn't comprehend the fact that an automobile owner is often an easy mark.  She doesn't fully appreciate the difficulties of the situation, and the next thing that happens is that Cupid makes a quick getaway and the wife consults a lawyer.  My last word of warning to husbands is -- don't get an automobile.'

This narrative reveals the experience of the Seavers.  Automobile rides, when she wasn't along, were the theme of Mrs. Seaver's petition.  They are members of Chicago's socially elect."

The source citation for this article is:

"Auto Friend Divorce CourtDes Moines [Iowa]Tribune newspaper, dated 25 November 1907, page 8, column 6, Mrs. Vernon C. Seaver article; digital image, Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com :  accessed 4 October 2018).

Vernon Charles Seaver (1863-1951) was born in Holly, Michigan to Hiram and Ruth (Packer) Seaver.  He married three times - first in 1884 to Effie Clara McKee (1868-1954), and they had two children.  Second, to Mabel ???? (1871-????) before 1900, and they had one child.  Third, to Ethel Burley (1885-????) in 1920 and they had no children.  Vernon died in Miami, Florida.

Vernon Charles Seaver, owner of the touring car, is my 4th cousin 4 times removed.  He is the grandfather of one of my Facebook friends!  I hope she sees this post.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.