Wednesday, October 16, 2019

Daughter Tami's Junior High Graduation in 1991 -- Post 587 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

I can't help it, I can't do a wordless post!  I found some more family photos hiding in my voluminous My Pictures file folder - I don't think I've posted this one yet.

This photograph was taken in June 1991 at Hilltop Junior High School in Chula Vista.  Our daughter, Tami, holding the flowers, had just graduated from 9th grade at this school.

From the left are my mother, Betty (Carringer) Seaver (1919-2002, so she was 71+ in this photo), myself (at age 47+), Tami (at age 14+) and my wife Linda (at age 48+).

My mother loved to go to graduations of her grandchildren!  I look forward to doing that too - only three more years!

                        =============================================


The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Tuesday, October 15, 2019

Genealogy News Bytes - 15 October 2019


Some of the genealogy news and education items across my monitor the last four days include:


2)  New or Updated Record Collections:



3)  Genealogy Education - Webinars (times are US Pacific):

 GeneaWebinars Calendar




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 15 October, 5 p.m.:  Civil Law Records in Genealogical Research: Notarial Records, by Claire Bettag

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 16 October, 11 a.m.:  Italian Civil Registration (Stato Civile): Going Beyond the Basics, by Melanie D. Holtz

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Hoe kan ik mijn MyHeritage familiestamboom beter beheren? (Dutch) by MyHeritage

4)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips:  #119r - Timelines


*  The Genealogy Guys; Podcast #369


5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):







6)  Genealogy Bargains:



7)  DNA Stories




8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 11 October 2019?


==============================================


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Introducing AncestryHealth®: Actionable Health Insights for You and Your Family

I received this from Ancestry.com today:

==========================================

Ancestry® Announces Genotype and Next Generation Genetic Sequencing Services



LEHI, Utah & SAN FRANCISCO - (Oct. 15, 2019) – For more than 30 years, Ancestry®, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, has built innovative services that empower millions of people to make more meaningful discoveries about themselves and their families. First with family history, then through DNA and today, with the introduction of AncestryHealth®. AncestryHealth is a long-term commitment to making a difference in preventive health through personalized and actionable insights.

Through a highly supportive and guided experience, AncestryHealth services deliver actionable insights that can empower people to take proactive steps -- in collaboration with their healthcare provider -- to address potential health risks identified in their genes and family health history. In a recent AncestryDNA® customer survey, 83 percent of respondents said they are looking for new ways to improve their health and 89 percent said it is critical for their children to learn about improving their health.

AncestryHealth is launching with two new services. AncestryHealth Core™, a one-time, array-based service, and AncestryHealth Plus™, a membership service using next generation sequencing (NGS) technology, help people start on the path toward better health for themselves and their families.

AncestryHealth services include:

  • Physician-ordered tests that were developed and are performed by independent CLIA-certified laboratories
  • Educational information, including access to genetic counseling resources
  • Printable consumer and physician-ready reports that provide guidance for next steps an individual and their healthcare provider can take together
  • Ancestry has partnered with PWNHealth, an independent network of board-certified physicians and genetic counselors, to offer these services, which are included in both AncestryHealth Core and AncestryHealth Plus.

“Your genes don’t need to be your destiny. Understanding your familial and inherited health risks can help you take action with your doctor to improve your chances of better health outcomes,” said Margo Georgiadis, chief executive officer of Ancestry. “For more than three decades, Ancestry has empowered journeys of personal discovery to enrich lives. In the same way that knowledge of your family and ethnicity helps you understand your past to inspire your future, knowledge of your genetic health profile and any associated risks can help you be proactive in managing the future for you and your family.”


AncestryHealth Products and Availability

AncestryHealth delivers personalized insights so people can take action to better manage their health in collaboration with their healthcare provider.

AncestryHealth Core is a first step on the journey of understanding how family heritage and genetics can impact health and wellness. It covers a set of curated, common ‘need to know’ health conditions and includes printable family health history and lab reports people can share with their healthcare provider. The physician-ordered laboratory test included in AncestryHealth Core uses genotyping array technology to detect genetic differences and deliver personalized reports related to health conditions such as heart disease, hereditary cancers, blood-related disorders, and risks for carrier status of health conditions, such as Tay-Sachs disease. Additionally, there are wellness reports on topics such as nutrition and metabolism. AncestryHealth Core is priced at $149 and includes AncestryDNA. Existing AncestryDNA customers can upgrade to AncestryHealth Core for $49.

AncestryHealth Plus will use next generation sequencing (NGS) technology to deliver more comprehensive screening data, providing both greater coverage of DNA differences for each condition and more risk categories such as those related to potentially developing heart disease, cancers, and disorders related to blood, the nervous system and connective tissues. For new customers, AncestryHealth Plus with NGS technology has a $199 activation fee, which includes the first six months of membership with an additional $49 membership fee every six months. Existing AncestryDNA customers can upgrade to AncestryHealth Plus for an initial payment of $49. The ongoing membership will include quarterly screening updates, more educational resources and enhanced tools for family health history and healthcare provider collaboration.  

Both AncestryHealth services include simple, step-by-step guidance to help people track and record their family health history all in one place. Family health history information often holds important clues about an individual’s risk for disease and is an important foundation, along with genetic screening, to proactively identify and address potential health risks. Customers can download and share a printable version of their family health history, along with their test results, with their healthcare provider so they can have the information necessary to personalize their care and take proactive steps where clinically necessary.

“Genetics play an important role in your health, along with factors such as your family’s health history, lifestyle and diet,” said Catherine Ball, Ph.D., Chief Scientific Officer at Ancestry. “Our job is to make sure our customers are educated, informed and supported throughout their health journey with us. Empowered with the right information, they can take proactive steps now to manage their and their families’ health for years to come.”

Ancestry is committed to safeguarding customers’ data and privacy. Just like all Ancestry offerings, AncestryHealth gives customers full consent and control over their own data at all times. Ancestry does not share customers’ DNA data with insurers, employers or third-party marketers.

AncestryHealth services are now available at www.ancestry.com/health.

 #  #   #


About Ancestry

Ancestry, the global leader in family history and consumer genomics, empowers journeys of personal discovery to enrich lives.  Our highest priority is protecting the privacy of the people who trust us to enhance their understanding of their past, present and future.  For more information about Ancestry, visit www.ancestry.com/health.  

AncestryDNA uses advanced genomic science to help members uncover new details about their family history by giving them more ways to explore their DNA matches, connect to more precise regions, and gain insights into personal traits. And with over 15 million people, AncestryDNA is the world’s largest consumer DNA network.

The tests offered by AncestryHealth® are not diagnostic and do not determine overall chances of developing a disease or health condition. The tests are not cleared or approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and are not currently available in New York, New Jersey or Rhode Island.

There is an Ancestry.com blog post by CEO Margo Georgiadis at https://blogs.ancestry.com/ancestry/2019/10/15/your-genes-do-not-need-to-be-your-destiny

                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Treasure Chest Tuesday - 1800 U.S. Census Record for Joseph Oatly Household in South Kingstown, R.I.

It's Treasure Chest Tuesday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1800 U.S. Census record for the Joseph Oatly household in South Kingston, Rhode Island:  


The Joseph "Oatly" household is at the top of the page:

The extracted information for the Joseph "Oatly" household is:

*  Head of household:  Joseph Oatly

*  2 males under age 10 (probably son Stephen born in 1796, and Joseph born in 1793)

*  1 male aged 10 to 15 (probably son Jonathan born in 1790)*  1 male aged 26 to 44 (certainly Joseph Oatley, born in 1756)

*  1 female under age 10 (probably daughter Mary born in 1798)

*  3 females aged 10 to 15 (probably daughter Nancy born in 1788, daughter Betsy born 1786, and daughter Hannah born 1783
*  1 female aged 26 to 44 (certainly wife Mary, born in 1765)


The source citation for this record is:

1800 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 701 (stamped), Joseph Oatly household,; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com ; accessed 19 February 2005); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M32, Roll 46.

Joseph Oatley (1756-1815) was the son of Benedict and Elizabeth (Ladd) Oatley.  He married Mary Hazard (1765-1857) in 1781, and they had 11 children between 1781 and 1806. 

Note that Joseph "Oatly" is enumerated just above several other Oatly households in a census with alphabetical ordering.

Joseph and Mary (Hazard) Oatley are my 4th great-grandparents, through their son Jonathan Oatley (1790-1872) who married Amy Champlin (1798-1865) in 1813.

                                   ===========================================


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Monday, October 14, 2019

Monday Genea-Pourri - Week Ending 13 October 2019

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)  Moderated the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) Research Group Meeting  on Wednesday with 14 attendees.  I reported on the GenealogyBank search for FamilySearch Family Tree people, the Newspapers.com obituary search collection on Ancestry, Family Tree Maker 2019 release, my cousin bait success, MyHeritage Live 2019 videos, and Finding Your Roots.  We watched the Yaniv Erlich TEDMED talk video.

2)  Attended the SDGS monthly program meeting on Saturday.  The speaker was Julieanne DeWalt Adamik, the NSDCGS President, on beginning DNA research.  

3)  Worked a bit on  my new presentation on "Researching in Historical Newspapers" which I will give at the 30 October CVGS general meeting - about 60% done now.

4)  Watched one Family Tree Webinars video -  50 Records that Document Female Ancestors, by Gena Philibert-Ortega. 

5)  Wrote and posted a biographical sketch of 6th great-grandfather #510 Ephraim Rolfe (1743-1818) for my 52 Ancestors biographical sketch on Friday.  


7) There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 33,121 of my RootsMagic persons with FSFT.

8)  Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and sources to my RootsMagic profiles.  I now have 55,073 persons in my RootsMagic file, and 110,850 source citations.   I TreeShared twice this week updating 265 profiles, and I resolved 925 Ancestry Hints.  I've fallen behind on the Ancestry Record Hints with 115,461 to be resolved, but I work on them weekly.

9)  Added several more ThruLines to DNA matches to my RootsMagic file.  Added Notes to about 5 AncestryDNA matches.   Looked at my new MyHeritageDNA matches and added several notes.  I need to tabulate these and get them into clusters.  

10) Wrote 18 Genea-Musings blog posts last week, of which two were a press release.  The most popular post last week was 
Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Which Ancestral Home Would You Like to Visit? with over 358 views.


                              =============================================

The URL for this post is: 

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Amanuensis Monday -- 1775 Deed of Simon Gates Buying Land from David Wilder in Worcester County, Massachusetts

This week's document for Amanuensis Monday is a 1775 deed of  Simon Gates buying land from David Wilder in Westminster, Massachusetts in the Worcester County, Massachusetts Land Records: 

[Volume 73, page 353]

The transcription of this deed is:

[page 353 at top of right-hand page]

[in left margin]

Wilder
to 
Gates


[body of text]


To all People to whom these Presents come Greeting. Know ye that I David
Wilder of Lancaster in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay in new England
and in the County of Worcester Gentleman for and in consideration of the sum of Thirty
Pounds lawfull money to me in Hand before the Ensealing hereof well and truly
paid Simon Gates Yeoman of Westminster in the County aforesaid the Receipt
whereof I do hereby acknowledge and my self therewith fully satisfyed and
contented and thereof and every part and parcel thereof do Exonerate acquit
and discharge him the said Simon Gates his Heirs Executors and adm^rs
forever by these Presents have given granted bargained sold aliened conveyed
and confirmed by these presents do freely fully and absolutely give grant
bargain sell aliene convey and confirm unto him the said Simon Gates his
Heirs and assigns forever Sixty acres of Land scituate in the Town of Westminster
in said County and is the Lott number 27 of the second Division belonging to y^e
originall Lott Number one hundred & three saving two acres allowed in said
Lott for a Private or a highway and otherways as it is sett forth in the Proprie-
tors Book of Records.  To Have and to Hold the said granted & bargained
Premises with all the appurtenances Priviledges and Commodities be the same
belonging or in any wise appertaining to him the said Simon Gates his heirs
and assigns that before the Ensealing hereof I am the true sole and lawfull
owner of the above bargained Premises and am lawfully seized and possessed
of the same and have in good Right full Power & lawfull Authority to grant
bargain sell convey and confirm unto him the said Simon Gates his Heirs
and assigns forever.  Furthermore I the said David Wilder for myself my
heirs Executors and administrators do Covenant & Engage the above demised
Premises to him the said Simon Gates his Heirs and assigns against the
Lawfull Claims or Demands of any Person or Persons whatsoever forever
hereafter to Warrant secure and defend by these Presents.  In Witness whereof I
have hereunto set my Hand and Seal this Eleventh Day of April in the four-
teenth year of his Majesty's Reign Anno Domini 1775.  David Wilder  {seal}
Signed sealed and delivered in Presence of us Josiah Kendall Jun^r Abijah Willard
Worcester ss April y^e 11^th 1775.  David Wilder personally appeared before me and
acknowledged this Instrument to be his free Act & Deed.
                                                                          Abijah Willard Just ^o^ Pac^m.
Oct. 27 1775  Rec^d & accordingly Entered & Exam^d  pr. Tim^o Paine Reg^r

The source citation for this recorded deed is:


"Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 13 January 2015), Worcester County, "Deeds, 1774-1776, Vol. 73-74," Volume 73, Page 353, image 194 of 599, Deed of David Wilder 

 to Simon Gates, executed 11 April 1775, recorded 27 October 1775; citing records in land offices and county courthouses, statewide in Massachusetts.

This is the first recorded deed found for Simon Gates of Westminster, Massachusetts, and it is for Lot 27 of the second division in Westminster.  No metes and bounds are noted for this tract of 60 acres which Simon Gates purchased for 30 pounds.  Note that this deed was executed one week before the Revolutionary War started at Lexington and Concord.

Simon Gates (1739-1803), son of Amos and Mary (Hubbard) Gates, who married Susanna Reed (1745-1833) in 1766, is my 5th great-grandfather.  I am descended from their son, Nathan Gates (1767-1830) who married Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855) in 1790.

                                     =========================================

NOTE:  Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 


"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/amanuensis-monday-1775-deed-of-simon.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Sunday, October 13, 2019

Best of the Genea-Blogs - Week of 6 to 12 October 2019

Dozens of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.

My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.


Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


The GEDCOM 5.5.5 Initiative and Making It Work by Louis Kessler on Behold Genealogy.

*   Do Not Suggest Anything Secondary - Yeah, Get Real by Michael John Neill on Rootdig.

About That Court Case and The History in the News by Judy G. Russell on The Legal Genealogist.

*  Top 10 ways to deliver a better genealogy presentation in another country, province, state or city and Top 5 ways genealogical societies can help speakers ‘from away’ deliver better presentations by Gail Dever on Genealogy a la Carte.

The Saga of a Family bible by David Allen Lambert on Vita Brevis.

New GeneaGem: Mapping the Nation by Linda Stufflebean on Empty Branches on the Family Tree.

2 Ways to Find the Loose Ends in Your Family Tree by DiAnn Iamarino on Fortify Your Family Tree.

20 Ideas for Family History Month by Gena Philibert Ortega on GenealogyBank Blog.

Using Sim-cM to Evaluate DNA Evidence by Erin Hill-Burns on Genes & History.

*  How Do You Feel About Sharing Photos of Your Ancestors? by Marian Pierre-Louis on Legacy News.

DNA Painter: Ancestral Trees by Roberta Estes on DNAeXplained -- Genetic Genealogy.

Serendipity Meets Genea-generosity by Pauline Cass on Family History Across the Seas.

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Friday's Family History Finds by Linda Stufflebean on Empty Branches on the Family Tree.

*  Friday Fossicking - 11th Oct 2019 by Crissouli on That Moment in Time.


This Week's Creme de la Creme -- October 12, 2019  by Gail Dever on Genealogy a la Carte,

 Saturday Serendipity ((Saturday, October 12, 2019) by John D. Tew on Filiopietism Prism.  Welcome back!


Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and    read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.


Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I currently am reading posts from over 900 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


                     =======================================================

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/best-of-genea-blogs-week-of-6-to-12.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Added and Updated Ancestry.com Record Collections - Week of 6 to 12 October 2019

The following record collections were listed on the Ancestry Card Catalog list on Ancestry.com during the period from 6 to 12 October 2019 

The ADDED and Updated record collections are:

Zacatecas, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1861-1952; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

1891 Census of Canada; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

1911 Census of Canada; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

Michoacan, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1859-1940; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

Federal District, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1861-1950; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

Chihuahua, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1861-1967; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

Mexico, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1861-1939; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1860-1948; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/10/2019

Zacatecas, Mexico, Civil Registration Deaths, 1861-1987; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/9/2019

1920 United States Federal Census; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/9/2019

Germany, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; indexed records without digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

UK and Ireland, Find A Grave Index, 1300s-Current; indexed records without digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Canada, Find A Grave Index, 1600s-Current; indexed records without digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Illinois, Roman Catholic Diocese of Springfield Sacramental Records, 1853-1975; indexed records with digital images, ADDED 10/8/2019

Australia and New Zealand, Find A Grave Index, 1800s-Current; indexed records without digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Surrey, England, Church of England Baptisms, Marriages and Burials, 1538-1812; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/8/2019


San Luis Potosi, Mexico, Civil Registration Marriages, 1860-1967; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Surrey, England, Church of England Baptisms, 1813-1917; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Surrey, England, Church of England Marriages and Banns, 1754-1937; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

Surrey, England, Church of England Burials, 1813-1987; indexed records with digital images, Updated 10/8/2019

=================================================

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at    http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  

By my count, there were 1 NEW collections ADDED this past week, per the list above.  There are now 32,694 collections available as of 12 October, an increase of  1 from last week.

                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.