Friday, February 22, 2019

New Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday, 22 February 2019

K received this information from Findmypast today:

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New Records Available To Search this Findmypast Friday

There are over 800,000 new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Firday.

Yorkshire Baptisms

Over 135,000 new additions covering 81 new parishes have been added to the collection.
Each record contains both a transcript and an image of the original register entry that will reveal a combination of your ancestor's baptism date, baptism place, denomination and parent's names.

Yorkshire Banns

Find out if your Yorkshire ancestors were married by banns with over 35,000 new records covering 57 additional parishes.
Each record contains both a transcript and an image of the original register entry that will reveal a combination of your ancestor's banns date, marriage year, residence, spouse's name and spouse's residence.

Yorkshire Marriages

Did your ancestor's tie the knot in god's own county? Over 53,000 additional records covering 68 new parishes.
Each record contains both a transcript and an image of the original register entry that will reveal a combination of the marriage date, marriage location, birth year, residence, occupation, marital status, father's name and witness's names for both the bride and groom.

Yorkshire Burials

Discover the final resting place of your Yorkshire ancestors with over 124,000 additional records covering 86 new parishes have been added to the collection.
Each record contains both a transcript and an image of the original register entry that will reveal a combination of your ancestor's birth year, age at death, burial date and location.

Scotland, Antenuptial Relationship Index 1661-1780

Do you have ancestors that were members of the Church of Scotland? Search over 31,000 antenuptial records from Kirk Sessions registers to find out if there were any family members who were summoned to the ministers and elders of the church to deny or confess their sin as a child had been conceived out of wedlock
In these cases of 'antenuptial fornication', it was the mother of the child who would be summoned first, they would be sternly rebuked and persuaded to name the father of the child if he was not an obvious boyfriend. The father was then told of the accusation, summoned and would either appear or write, to deny or confess his sin. The session would summon the mother and father of the child back to subsequent meetings until the matter was resolved and the mother, or sometimes the couple, made some sort of reparation, often with the mother standing at the church door for 3 Sabbaths. When they had fully repented, and been pardoned, each was welcomed back into the church.

1939 Register update

Over 287,000 additional 'open' records have been added to the 1939 Register. Since the Register was launched, Findmypast has matched more than four million 'closed records' to multiple data sources to correctly confirm the date and location of death for individuals recorded.
The 1939 Register now contains more than 34.2 million searchable records. Each record includes the names of inhabitants at each address, their date of birth, marital status and occupation. A wealth of contextual information, including period photographs never before seen online, infographics, region-specific newspaper articles and historical and contemporary maps, are personally tailored to each record, offering a rich and unique user experience unrivalled by any other family history research tool to date.

New Records from Barbados

Over 736,000 records from the Eastern Caribbean Island of Barbados are now available to search. Sourced via the International Genealogical Index, these new additions consist of six individual collections covering births, marriages, deaths, baptisms and burials between 1637 and 1891.
The Barbados collections currently available to search include:
·         Barbados Burial Index 1854-1885

British & Irish Newspaper Update

This week 134,952 have joined the Archive. We have added two Home Counties titles for England, The East Kent Gazette and the Bucks Examiner for Buckinghamshire. We have also added to ten of our existing titles, including:
·        Birmingham Daily Post - 1965
·        Coventry Evening Telegraph - 1935
·        Drogheda Independent - 1895
·        Irish Independent - 1914, 1925
·        Newcastle Journal - 1995
·        Perthshire Advertiser - 1907
·        Runcorn Guardian - 1909
·        South Wales Daily News - 1910
·        Sunday Independent (Dublin) - 1986-1990, 1992-1993, 1995
·        Sunday Tribune - 1990-1992
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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Findmypast Acquires RootsFinder, Inc.

I received this information from Findmypast today:

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FINDMYPAST ACQUIRES ROOTSFINDER INC.

·         RootsFinder accelerates Findmypast’s development of the Findmypast Tree.
·         Acquisition marks the latest step in Findmypast’s drive to innovate and enhance user discoveries.
·         RootsFinder founder, Dallan Quass, joins the Findmypast team to assist with future integration work and tree development

Leading family history website, Findmypast, has acquired RootsFinder Inc. and their critically acclaimed RootsFinder family tree product, including new features to help customers analyze their DNA results.

The acquisition reflects Findmypast’s drive to innovate and enhance their customer experience by providing users with new ways to curate, share and explore their family history discoveries.

The acquisition will serve to help Findmypast and its partners accelerate development towards the new “Findmypast Tree” – a continuing effort that seeks to connect users anywhere in the world and offer them the opportunity to discover their family history by working together.  

Founded in 2014 by Dallan Quass, RootsFinder is a free online family tree builder that provides users with the ability to collect and store data from a variety of online sources, engaging ways to capture and visualize media, family connections as well as powerful tools to analyze DNA results. RootsFinder has established itself as popular resource for genealogists across the world and was selected as a semi-finalist in the 2017 RootsTech Innovator Showdown.

Findmypast will look to make use of a number of RootsFinder features in the development of the new tree including data storage, enhanced gedcom uploads, community collaboration, DNA visualizations, error checking and 3rd party hints. These features will enable family historians to improve accuracy and uncover new leads through collaboration with fellow researchers.

There are no plans to change the features and services RootsFinder users currently enjoy and RootsFinder will continue to operate as a standalone product for the foreseeable future.

RootsFinder founder, Dallan Quass, will be joining the Findmypast team as SVP of Family History Technology and will assist with future integration work and development of the new tree. Dallan brings with him a wealth of experience in building family history platforms, machine learning, and search technologies.

Dallan Quass, founder of RootsFinder said: “Findmypast's commitment to novice and experienced genealogists alike is inspiring. We are thrilled to be part of their drive to make family history discoveries fun and rewarding for everyone regardless of skill level. Using extensive record collections and leading-edge technology, Findmypast and RootsFinder will help more people than ever before to discover who they are.”

Tamsin Todd, CEO of Findmypast said: “With RootsFinder, Dallan Quass has once again demonstrated his passion for innovating in family history. We are excited to add a product that is so well regarded by genealogists to the Findmypast family, and it will form a key part of our product roadmap as we work to make family history accessible and easy for users at all stages of their discovery journeys.”


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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

I have used RootsFinder but have not made it my primary genealogy management program.  I think that this is an excellent move by Findmypast because of RootsFinders Web Hint capability and DNA analysis tools.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


52 Ancestors - Week 266: #435 Elizabeth (Wills) Laver (1730-1796) of South Petherton, Somerset

Elizabeth Wills (1730-1796)  is #435 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married #434 John Laver (1722-1799)  in 1750 in Lopen, Somerset, England.

I am descended through:

*  their daughter, son, #217 Joanna Lavor (1763-1836), married #216 John Vaux (1747-1806), in 1785.
*  their son, #108 James Vaux (1787-1839), married #109 Mary Palmer (1790-1845) in 1808.
*  their son, #54 Samuel Vaux (1816-1880), married  #55, Mary Ann Underhill (1815-1882) in 1839.
*  their daughter, #27 Abigail A. Vaux (1844-1931), married #26 Devier James Lamphear Smith (1839-1894) in 1861.
*  their daughter, #13 Abby Ardell Smith (1862-1944), married #12 Henry Austin Carringer (1853-1946), in 1887.
*  their son, #6 Lyle Lawrence Carringer (1891-1976), married #7 Emily Kemp Auble (1899-1977).
*  their daughter #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) who married #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

 *   Name:                           Elizabeth Wills[1–3]
*  Alternate Name:              Elizabeth Lavor[3-4]  

 *  Sex:                               Female
 
*  Father:                           Thomas Wills (1705- )
*  Mother:                         Mary Screven (1706- )    
 
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 
*  Birth:                             before 16 August 1730, Merriott, Somerset, England[1,3]
*  Christened:                   16 August 1730 (after age 0), Merriott, Somerset, England[1,3]    

*  Death:                            before 1 January 1796 (before age 65), South Petherton, Somerset, England[3-4]    
*  Burial:                           1 January 1796 (after age 65), South Petherton, Somerset, England[3-4]
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Spouse 1:                   John Laver (1722-1799)    
*  Marriage 1:               16 April 1750 (after age 27), Lopen, Somerset, England[2-3]    

*  Child 1:                     Thomas Laver (1750-1750)    
*  Child 2:                     Jane Laver (1751-    )    
*  Child 3:                     Betty Laver (1753-    )    
*  Child 4:                     John Laver (1755-    )    
*  Child 5:                     Jacob Laver (1757-    )    
*  Child 6:                     William Laver (1759-    )    
*  Child 7:                     Joanna Laver (1761-1762)    
*  Child 8:                     Joanna Lavor (1763-1836)    
*  Child 9:                     Samuel Laver (1764-1834)    
*  Child 10:                   Hannah Laver (1766-    )    
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):  

Elizabeth Wills was baptized on 16 August 1730 in Merriott, Somerset, England, the daughter of Thomas and Mary (Screven) Wills[1,3].

She married John Laver (christened at South Petherton, Somerset on 30 October 1722) on 16 April 1750 in Lopen, Somerset[2-3].  They had at least 10 children, all born in South Petherton, and some were christened in the South Petherton Parish Records of the St. Peter and St. Paul church:

*  Thomas Laver, born about 1750.
*  Jane Laver, christened 14 August 1751, married 5 January 1779 to Francis Sturton in South Petherton.
*  Betty Laver, charistened 28 March 1753.
*  John Laver, christened 31 January 1755.
*  Jacob Laver, christened 4 February 1757.
*  William Laver, christened 17 January 1759, married 14 May 1789 to Elizabeth Stuckey.
*  Joanna Laver, christened about 1761, buried 17 May 1762.
*  Joanna Laver, christened 5 January 1763, buried 4 November 1836, married 2 August 1785 to John Vaux.
*  Samuel Laver, christened 7 July 1764, buried 25 April 1834, married 4 September 1788 to Susannah Hebditch.
*  Hannah Laver, christened 31 December 1766. 

Not much is known about this Laver family, perhaps because they were Non-Conformists.  The Old Meeting house (Presbyterian) records start again in 1747, and many baptisms, marriages and burials of the Laver family were recorded in the South Petherton parish church[3].

Elizabeth Lavor was buried 1 January 1796 in South Petherton, at the age of 65[3-4]. 
 
5.  SOURCES

1. "English Births and Christenings, 1538-1975," indexed database, FamilySearch  (http://www.familysearch.org), Merriott, Somerset, Eliz. Wills christening entry.

2. "Somerset Marriages (pre-1754) Transcription," indexed database, Findmypast (http://www.findmypast.com), Lopen, Somerset, John Laver and Elizabeth Wills entry, 1750.

3. Sara Anson Vaux, The Vaux Family of England, the United States, and Australia, digital manuscript (available at http://www.southpethertoninformation.org.uk/vaux_family_of_england_index%20page.htm), Chapter 6, Laver family information, pages 21-27.

4. Hanna Nicholas and Liz James, "South Petherton Parish Records," online database, South Petherton Information (http://www.southpethertoninformation.org.uk/index.html), "Burials, 1795-1799," Elizth Lavor entry.

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NOTE:  In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2019 to 312 Ancestors in 312 Weeks.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, February 21, 2019

Seavers in the News - Thomas Whitchurch Seaver Dies in Sydney, Australia in 1936

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Sydney [Australia] Morning Herald  newspaper dated 31 December 1936:

The transcription of the article is:

"MR. T.W. SEAVER

"Mr. Thomas Whitchurch Seaver, aged 81, who died suddenly on Tuesday at his home in Neutral Bay, was a well-known engineer, and at the time of his death was attached to the National Roads and Motorists' Association.  His father was the Dean of Belfast.  When about 30 years of age, Mr. Seaver went to New Zealand, and later moved to Melbourne, where he was attached to the Public Works Department.  Subsequently he came to New South Wales, and after a short period of Government service, he became engineer to the North Sydney Council.

"He was one of the pioneers in the use of concrete for road surfaces, and his work is to be seen in some of the main thoroughfares of the municipality.  He retired many years ago.  He was a warm advocate of concrete roads in the country in lieu of feeder railways.  He was a member of the Town Planning Association.  He was also a member of the North Sydney Orphans' Club, the Ulster Association, and the Masonic fraternity.

"Mrs. Seaver died a couple of years ago, and Mr. Seaver has left two daughters.

"The funeral, which was a private one, took place yesterday morning at the Northern Suburbs Crematorium.  It was preceded by a service at St. Augustine's Church, Neutral Bay, conducted by the Rev. H.W. Stanger.  A large number of friends attended this service."

The source citation for the article is:

"Mr. T.W. Seaver," The Sydney [Australia] Morning Herald newspaper, obituary, Thursday, 31 December 1936, page 14, column 7, Thomas Whitchurch Seaver obituary;   Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 21 February 2019).

I recently added a number of Irish Seaver families to my RootsMagic family tree because I am doing a Seaver One-Name study.  Thomas Whitchurch Seaver was one of the additions, but I did not know his death date.  I did know the names of his wife and his three daughters.

Thomas Whitchurch (1855-1936) was born 20 September 1855 in Newry, County Down, Ireland, the son of Reverend Charles and Fanny Anne (Shields) Seaver.   He married Henrietta Alexandra "Etta" Lascelles (1857-1934) in about 1883, and they had three daughters:

*  Eileen Frances May Seaver (1885-????).
*  Vera Lascelles Seaver (1887-????)
*  Marguerite Stewart Seaver (1889-1975).

I am not related, to my knowledge, to Thomas Whitchurch Seaver.

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Disclosure:  I have a paid subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.




Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Census Enumerators Make Mistakes Sometimes

At the CVGS DNA Interest Group yesterday, one of my colleagues asked for help finding the names of the parents of his grandfather, Nicholas Reiss, who was born in 1915 in Chicago, Illinois.  The earliest record my colleague had is the 1920 United States Census record in Chicago, Cook County, Illinois.

Searching for Nicholas Reiss born in 1915 easily found him in the 1920 census, listed as a "Son" in line 3 on page 2A of ED 204 in Chicago 4th Ward


Note that there is also a "Daughter" Loretta Reiss listed just above him on line 2 on the page.

So we went to the previous page (1B) to see the rest of the family:


The head of household in this family is Vito Rizzo, with wife Elvira, daughter Fannie, and Michael Lopresta, a brother-in-law.  

Rizzo?  Not Reiss?  Huh?  Is this a second marriage for Vito Rizzo?  Is the wife Elvira Rizzo the mother of the two Reiss children?  They are listed as "Daughter" and "Son" and not as step-daughter and step-son, nor as niece and nephew, nor as boarders.

On the first screen above - page 2A - magnifying the names of Nicholas and his sister, you can see what happened:


In the left-hand margin is the note "See 1A" next to line 2.

In the "house number" column, the number is "452" and not "462" next to Loretta Reiss.

In the "number of dwelling house in order of visitation" column, the number is "9" and not '14."

In the number of family in order of visitation" column,  the number is "14" and not "26.

This means that we have to go to page 1A and look at house number 452 for dwelling house 9 and family number 14.

Here is the page 1A of this census enumeration district:


Down at the bottom of the page is the family residing at 452 West 28th Place, house number 9, family number 14:


There is a Reiss family starting line 46:

*  Otto Reiss, head of household, age 39, married.
*  Rose Reiss, wife, age 39, married.
*  William Reiss, son, age 17, single.
*  John Reiss, son, age 12, single.
*  Helen Reiss, daughter, age 9, single.

So it appears that the census enumerator made a mistake as he wrote information on the census forms that we have at the National Archives.  The two children, Loretta and Nicholas Reiss, were near the top of the third sheet (page 2A) of the enumeration district, and they should have been at the top of the second sheet of the enumeration district.

The enumerator wrote a note on the record and added the correct numbers for the correct family on the form in the line when he found he had made the error.

My colleague was ecstatic to find the names of his great-grandparents, and also his four great aunts and uncles.  

Do you have ancestors or relatives that appear in a family when they logically should not appear?  Perhaps it is an error like this one.  You may find the correct family one or more pages before the listing of the indexed person.

The lesson learned here is:  Only be reading a record with a critical eye, and transcribing or extracting the information on the record, can a researcher find correct information and interpret it.  

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Treasure Chest Thursday - 1780 Military Payment Record for John Underhill Jr. in Chester, N.H.

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1780 military payment record of John Underhill Jr. in the Revolutionary War Service Records:

The transcription of this record is:

State of New }     Chester  July 12^th 1780
Hampshire     }    In Obedience to orders from the
                             Hon^le Committee of safty for
said State dated at Exeter the 27 of June 1780
Directing me to Raise and Muster and send 
forward to Haverhill in ????? six men
to serve untill the last day of December
next and to pay them two Dollars per mile
from their home to said Haverhill as travel
money accordingly we the Subscribers
do acknowledge that we have Received it
by order of the said John Webster Muster master
or from him as witnesseth or hand

Mens Names            Towns belong    Towns they  Number    Number
                                      to                      go for       of miles    of dollars
-----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Nathaniel Bartlett       Chester            Chester          100          200
John Underhill Junr    Chester              Ditto            100          200
Moses Presson            Chester              Ditto            100          200

 The above said money was advanced by the Select
men of Chester which was the prepotion for said
Chester.  Candias prepotion was two and Raymond
one but the maid ??? due Return to me thearfor
I can maik none a True Return ??????
Excepted as per me - John Webster Capt.

The source citation for this record is:

National Archives, "U.S. Revolutionary War Rolls, 1775-1783," digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 14 December 2016), New Hampshire > Walkers Company, 1777 (Folder 160) - Various Organizations, Nos 1-169 (Folders 175-177), image 52 of 778, John Underhill Junr payment entry.

This payment record for going 100 miles from Chester to Haverhill and back is an Original Source with Primary Information and Direct Evidence that John Underhill Junior performed the task assigned.  In addition, there is his signature on the record!

John Underhill (1741-1816) is the son of John and Joanna (Healey) Underhill  of Chester, New Hampshire.  He is my 5th great-grandfather.  He married Hannah Colby (1745-????) in about 1767, and they had seven children, including my 4th great-grandfather, Amos Underhill (1772-1865), who married Mary Metcalf (1780-1855) in 1801 in Piermont, New Hampshire.

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Wednesday, February 20, 2019

A Reader's Take on Ancestry.com Problems - Part V: Why Is There No Chromosome Browser?

In response to Dear Ancestry.com: Are You Fixing These Problems? (posted 17 January 2019), I received 38 comments on the post, and several via email.  

One of the email correspondents was a person who has Ancestry and IT experience, and offered knowledge, experience and wisdom for users of Ancestry.com, especially on the trees and the search engines.  The comments are detailed and ring true to me based on my experience (and that of others) working on Ancestry.com.  

A)  In this post, I want to concentrate on the question of why AncestryDNA does not have a chromosome browser.   I commented on it in point 8) in the Dear Ancestry.com: Are You Fixing These Problems? post).  My reader's response was:

The Chromosome Browser
I am not sure Ancestry will ever come around on this one. When they crunch the numbers, the estimates are that only 2-4% of users would actually use a Chromosome Browser. The costs of developing a Chromosome Browser, added to the costs of supporting the browser (lots more calls and emails to Member Services, which means more training and possibly more people), when weighed against the increase in the subscriber base or DNA subscriptions, the math doesn't work out.
The public statements around the Chromosome Browser have mirrored that - most people won't use it, it is of small overall value (to Ancestry), it is complex, and what Ancestry provides is so much better that you don't really need a Chromosome Browser.
The nail in the coffin, though, is privacy. Ancestry has clamped down on DNA test sharing in the past two years, requiring accounts for each test and much more explicit permissions to share results. Chromosome Browsers require DNA comparisons, which exposes them to potential privacy issues - people give their permission without understanding, and then freak out once something bad happens. Ancestry is the biggest target, and a perceived privacy problem could hurt them much more than the goodwill of having a Chromosome Browser would give them. Consider that Facebook, in its terms of service and API agreements allowed sharing of your friends information via its social graph. Even through users agreed to it, that decision - which lasted for only a few years - came back to bite them. Ancestry wants to avoid that, which is why I don't think you will ever see a Chromosome Browser.

B)  Randy's Notes and Comments:



If only 2% to 4% of all AncestryDNA testers actually would use a chromosome browser, that translates to 300,000 to 600,000 of their 15 million AncestryDNA testers.  But those 300,000 to 600,000 Ancestry users are probably year-over-year subscribers - and probably the devoted genealogists who want to learn as much as they can about their genetic genealogy and all of their genetic cousins who show up in their matches; folks like me and many of my readers.  

How is the AncestryDNA superior to other DNA testing services that do offer a chromosome browser?  In my opinion, it is superior only in the number of matches that have a genealogy tree.  In the early years, many AncestryDNA testers had an Ancestry Member Tree;  now, it seems that only about 10% have an Ancestry tree with more than 100 persons.  They might consider the Shared Ancestors feature to be superior to the competition, and it is, but there are very few Shared Ancestor matches for most of us - I have 318 out of 51,000 DNA matches (about 0.6%).  

Not having a chromosome browser has driven some AncestryDNA customers to download their raw DNA data and to upload it to GEDmatch or FamilyTreeDNA or MyHeritage, which do have a chromosome browser and other analysis tools.  The other test analyzers have benefited from Ancestry's decision.  So have the entrepreneurial third party DNA tool providers - like DNA Painter, Genetic Affairs, and others.  Good for them for providing tools that AncestryDNA won't provide.  

I think we all realize that this is not a zero sum game, and that competition makes every company better - there is more innovation and development of tools and techniques.

Concerning the privacy issue, I understand the uncertainty and the concern with the GDPR regulations in Europe.  


C)  See earlier posts on this general subject:

*  A Reader's Take on Ancestry.com Problems - Part I - Ancestry Member Tree Indexing (posted 23 January 2019)



D)  My thanks to my informed and concerned reader for the background and experience as we have worked through my list of perceived problems.  I know that the revealed knowledge has helped many of my readers to better understand, and deal with, the perceived problems.  

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Disclosure:  I have had a paid subscription to Ancestry.com since 2000, and use the site every day.  I have received material considerations from Ancestry.com in years past, but that does not affect my objectivity in writing about their products and services.

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/02/a-readers-take-on-ancestrycom-problems_20.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.