Monday, October 15, 2018

Amanuensis Monday - 1812 Deed of Zachariah Hildreth to Zachariah Hildreth Jr. in Townsend, Mass.

This week's document for Amanuensis Monday is the 1812 deed of Zachariah Hildreth of Townsend, Massachusetts to Zachariah Hildreth Junior of Townsend in the Middlesex County, Massachusetts Land Records:

[Volume 203, pages 178-179]

[Volume 203, pages 180-181]

The transcription of this deed is:

[Volume 203, page 179]


Know all Men by these presents that I Zachariah Hildreth of Towns-
end in the County of Middlesex and Commonwealth of Massachusetts gentle-
man in consideration of one thousand dollars paid by Zachariah Hildreth
Jun^r of the same Townsend aforesaid yeoman The receipt whereof I do hereby acknowl-
edge have remised released and forever quitclaimed and do for my self and my heirs
by these presents remise release and forever quitclaimed unto the said Zachariah Hil-
dreth Jun^r his heirs and assigns five certain pieces of land situate in Towns-
end aforesaid and bounded as follows, viz.  the first piece is situate on the
south side of the road leading from Nathan Scales to the meeting house with
the dwelling house standing on the same premises, and bounded thus begin-
ning at a stake and stones at the south side of the road abovesaid a cor-
ner of Simeon Greens land, thence southerly by said Greens land ^about^ twenty rods
to a stake and stones, thence westerly by said Greens land about sixty two
rods to a stake and stones in said Greens line, thence northerly by said
Scales land twenty rods to a stake and stones by the road abovesaid, thence
easterly by said road to the bounds first mentioned.  This piece of land con-
tains about eight acres, always reserving however all my right in and un-
to a certain ^well or^ spring in said land a little to the southeast of the brick house
on the premises which spring is now occupied as a well and a right to con-
tinue the aqueduct or a way for the water to run from the said spring or
well to the road, which is two thirds of the well and aquaduct, and a
privilege to pass and repass to and from said spring or well by the corner
of said brickhouse and yo dig &c for repairing said aquaduct in propor-
to my right in the same.   The second piece of land is situate on
the north side of said road and contains about twelve acres be the same
more or less and bounded thus beginning at a stake and stones ^by^ the north
side of said road a corner of said Simeon's land, thence northerly by said
Simeons and others land about one hundred and twenty one rods to a stake
and stones by the road leading from Eben^r Balls to the meeting house
thence westerly by said road twenty four rods to a stake and stones, thence
southerly by a straight line by my own land about one hundred and seventeen
rods to a stake and stones by the first mentioned road, thence easterly by
said road ten rods to the bounds first mentioned.  The third peice is
a peice of mowing situated and surrounded by my farm, and contains
about four acres and one fourth of an acre and bounded thus beginning
at a corner of a stone wall at the northeast corner of the garden so called

[Volume 203, page 180]

thence westerly a straight line by said garden wall about twenty three rods
to a stake and stones at another wall, thence north about eighteen degrees
east by the wall twenty four rods and nineteen ^links^ thence north about six-
ty two degrees east by the wall nine rods and seven links, thence 
south about twenty eight degrees east by the wall fourteen rods and fif-
teen links to a corner, thence southerly a straight line thirty one rods
and eight links to the bounds first mentioned.  I also hereby give liberty
to the said Zachariah Jun^r or any other person for or under him to pass
and repass with a team or otherwise to and from this peice of land thro'
my pasture the most convenient way and doing the least damage.
The fourth peice of land is situate on the plain near the foot of
baberry hill so called and on the south side of the road and contains a-
bout sixteen acres and bounded thus beginning at a stake and
stones by the south side of the old road and the east side of the road
leading from Nath^l Batchelders to the meeting house, thence southerly by
the last mentioned road to a stake and stones in Lemuel Petts line,
thence easterly by said Petts land to a stake and stones, thence northerly
by said Petts land to a stake and stones at Simeon Greens land, thence
westerly by said Greens land to a stake and stones by the road, thence wester-
ly by the south side of said road to the bounds first mentioned.
The fift peice is a peice of woodland and contains thirteen acres
and one third of an acre and bounded thus beginning at a stake
and stones in the line of land formerly owned by Jonas Farmer deceas-
ed, thence westerly by John Farmers land thirty three rods and eight
links to a stake and stones, thence north about twenty nine degrees east
by my own land sixty four rods to a stake and stones, thence easterly by
land of Nathan Scales thirty three rods and eight links to a stake and stones
thence southerly by said Jonas deceased land sixty four rods to the bound first
mentioned.  To have and to hold the aforementioned premises with all
the priviledges and appertenances thereunto belonging to me the said
Zachariah Hildreth nor my heirs nor any other person or persons,
claiming from or under one or them or in the name right or stead of
me or them, shall or will by any way or means have claim or demand any
right or title to the abovesaid premises or their appurtenances or to any part
or parcel thereof forever, excepting what is heretofore excepted and reserv-
ed.  In witness whereof I the said Zachariah Hildreth with Nabby my
wife she releasing her right of dower or thirds have  hereunto set our hands
and seals this twenty forth day of April in the year of our Lord eight-
een hundred and twelve.  Zachariah Hildreth and seal.  Nabby Hildreth
and seal.  Signed sealed and delivered in presents of us Daniel Adams

[Volume 203, page 181]

Benamuel Pratt Middlesex Ss April 24^th 1812.  Then the abovenamed
Zachariah Hildreth acknowledged the above instrument to be his free
act and deed before me Josiah Richardson Just. of the Peace.                     
                                       Middlesex Ss Cambridge  19^th January 1813
Received and Entered
                                         by Samuel Bartlett Regr.

The source citation for this recorded deed is:

"Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints,FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 23 September 2018), Middlesex County, "Deeds, 1813-1814, Vols. 203-205," Volume 203, pages 179-181 (images 94-95 of 834), Deed of Zachariah Hildreth to Zachariah Hildreth Jr., executed 24 April 1812, recorded 19 January 1813.

Zachariah Hildreth Junior (1783-1857) was the son of Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1829) and his first wife, Elizabeth Keyes (1759-1793).  This is the fourth land transaction for Zachariah Junior in the Middlesex County Deed index for 1800 to 1835.
The land sold is 5 parcels of land in Townsend, Massachusetts that were part of Zachariah Hildreth's holdings, totaling over 53 acres.  


Zachariah Hildreth Senior did not have a will or administration of his estate.  He likely gave or sold all of his land to his children piecemeal, perhaps to support himself and his second wife and their minor children.  At the time of this sale in 1812, Zachariah Senior is age 58, and has had nine children by his first wife (six living) before 1793 and eight more (five living) by his second wife after 1794.  

I need to find a book about historical Townsend and see if I can figure out exactly where the land is located.


Zachariah Hildreth Sr. (1754-1829) is my 4th great-grandfather, and Zachariah Hildreth Jr. (1783-1857) is my third great-grandfather, who married Hannah Sawtell (1789-1857) in 1810.  I am descended through their son, Edward Hildreth (1831-1899) who married Sophia Newton (1834-1923).

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NOTE:  Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver


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Sunday, October 14, 2018

Best of the Genea-Blogs - 7 to 13 October 2018

Dozens of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.

My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.


Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


Using Semi-Anonymous Genetic Data in Genealogical Conclusions by Blaine Bettinger on The Genetic Genealogist blog.

Knowing and Being Known: Genealogy, DNA and the Truth by Claudia C. Breland on The DNA Researcher Claudia C. Breland blog.

Finding Family Histories in the Archives by Melissa Barker on A Genealogist in the Archives blog.

Not All is On Find A Grave, See What Else You Can Find by Barbara Poole on the Life From the Roots blog.

*  Don’t Overlook the Online Ontario Land Records  by Lorine McGinnis Schulze on the Olive Tree Genealogy Blog.

*  Genealogical society members and directors should watch these videos from the 2018 North Texas Summit by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

Citing Sources Without Stressing Out by Amy Johnson Crow on the Amy Johnson Crow blog.

An NPE in My Tree by April on the Digging Up the Dirt on My Dead People blog.

Revamped and Updated My List of Genealogical Mysteries by Julie Cahill Tarr on the Julie's Genealogy & History Hub blog.

"Eighteen Hundred and Froze to Death" by Sue McNelly on The Kindred Past blog.

Still Not Indexed by Marcia Philbrick on the Heartland Genealogy blog.

3 Reasons to Have Personal Genealogy Software and How to Choose by Diana Elder on the Family Locket blog.

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Friday's Family History Finds by Linda Stufflebean on the Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog.

Friday Finds:  Week 41 -- 2018 by Martin Roe Eidhammer on the Norwegian Genealogy and then some blog.


*  Friday Fossicking, 12th Oct 2018 by Crissouli on the That Moment in Time blog.

This Week's Creme de la Creme -- October 13, 2018  by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.


Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I am currently reading posts from over 900 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


                     =======================================================

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Added or Updated Ancestry.com Record Collections - Week of 7 to 13 October 2018

The following record collections were listed on the Recently Added and Updated Collections list on Ancestry.com during the period from 7 to 13 October 2018 

The record collections added or updated since last week include:


No record collections were added or updated last week.  The list is the same as last week's list.  The last new record collection was added on 28 September.

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at   http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx. 
 

By my count, there were 0 NEW collections ADDED this past week, per the list above.  There are now 32,668 collections available as of 13 October, an increase of  0 from last week.   

                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Saturday, October 13, 2018

Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 7 to 13 October 2018

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at   FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 13 October 2018, there were 2,383 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 3 from last week):


The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Added   ---

*  Mississippi, World War I Service Cards, 1917-1919       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2968243); 62,781 indexed records with 62,781 record images, ADDED 5 Oct 2018

California, Sacramento Cemetery Records, 1900-1959      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2848498); 31,773 indexed records with 31,773 record images, ADDED 11 Oct 2018

Delaware, World War I Servicemen Records, 1917-1919     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2858132); 2,968 indexed records with 2,968 record images, ADDED 12 Oct 2018

--- Collections Updated ---


South Africa, Cape Province, Probate Records of the Master of the High Court, 1834-1989 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2517051); 1,475,888 indexed records with 1,167,010 record images (was 1,475,888 records with 1,167,010 images), Updated 11 Oct 2018

United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,168,489 indexed records with 46,885,712 record images (was 34,168,489 records with 46,885,712 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Sweden, Household Examination Books, 1880-1930  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2790465); 46,977,151 indexed records with 87,177 record images (was 46,977,151 records with 87,177 images), Updated 7 Oct 2018

Canada Census, 1871     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1551612); Index only (3,519,941 records), no images (was 3,519,941 records with 0 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Italy, Torino, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1802-1816    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1935457); 21,343 indexed records with 58,319 record images (was 0 records with 58,319 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Louisiana, Orleans Parish Vital Records, 1900-1964      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1929995); 148,420 indexed records with 54,869 record images (was 148,413 records with 54,869 images), Updated 11 Oct 2018

France, Calvados, Civil Registration, 1792-1942 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/3010087); Index only (1,692,790 records), no images (was 1,692,790 records with 0 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Massachusetts Marriages, 1841-1915      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1469062); 1,537,430 indexed records with 108,296 record images (was 1,537,430 records with 108,296 images), Updated 11 Oct 2018

Alabama State Census, 1855      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1915984); Index only (34,978 records), no images (was 34,978 records with 0 images), Updated 9 Oct 2018

Spain, Diocese of Lugo, Catholic Parish Records, 1550-1966      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1583608); Index only (219,508 records), no images (was 205,473 records with 0 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Kansas State Census, 1915       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2640442); 1,609,914 indexed records with 301,658 record images (was 0 records with 301,658 images), Updated 11 Oct 2018

California County Naturalizations, 1831-1985    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2125028); 438,758 indexed records with 99,436 record images (was 438,758 records with 99,436 images), Updated 6 Oct 2018

Italy, Pesaro e Urbino, Urbino, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1866-1942   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1977027); 118,183 indexed records with 709,381 record images (was 113,558 records with 709,381 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

Italy, Roma, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1863-1930      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2390532); 48,063 indexed records with 4,195,531 record images (was 0 records with 4,195,531 images), Updated 12 Oct 2018

--- Collections with images removed ---


Find A Grave Index      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2221801); 171,490,665 indexed records with 171,490,665 record images (was 171,490,666 records with 171,490,666 images),  28 Sep 2018



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In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. "church england") to find collections with those keywords.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

=============================================

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

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Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Your Sporting Activities

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It's Saturday Night again - 

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!


Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1)  What sporting activities did you participate in as a youth and as an adult?


2)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a comment on this post with a link to your post.

Thank you to Lisa Gorrell for suggesting this SNGF topic.


Here's mine:


As a child, I loved playing baseball, and being competitive.  We played at school on the south field, at the playground on the way home from school, at the park, and on the street by our house.  The best place was at Grape Street Park - there was a big grassy area that backed up to the golf course driving range.  We usually played three flies up (one player hits flies, and when someone catches three on the fly, they get to hit the flies).  This was tremendous for hitting, and for playing outfield.  

 I was small and left-handed, but coordinated, and I could throw, catch and run well, but didn't hit very well, but I bunted well.  I have always had poor eyesight without my glasses (amblyopia, left eye dominant), which I finally got when I was 12.  I still couldn't hit well after I got my glasses.

In 5th grade, there was a school baseball team, and we traveled to other schools to play their teams.  I usually was a substitute and played the outfield because of my size and hitting problems.  

When we finally got Little League in 1957, I was a year too old.  I tried out for Pony League, but didn't make the team.  So I became a coach and scorekeeper for my brother's Little League team, with my father as the manager.  That was fun, and I got to pitch batting practice and do infield drills.  When Stan turned 13, I was a coach and scorekeeper for his two years in Pony League with my father as manager.  

When my brother Scott turned 8, my dad managed his Little League teams for five years, and his Pony League team for two years.  I coached and scorekept all those years.  At age 23, I started managing a Little League team myself and did that for about six years until we had our first child.  When my daughter was 9 years old, Linda became a manager and I was the coach for the girls softball teams until they entered high school.

Back in the 1950s, brother Stan and I took the bus down to the PCL San Diego Padres field on Harbor Drive to attend games, and we listened to many of the games on the radio at home every night.  We also got a television around that time, and were able to watch the Game of the Week and the World Series.  My father, being from Massachusetts, was a Boston Red Sox fan, and hated the Yankees.  

I am still a San Diego Padres fan, and Linda and I have had a 20-game season ticket package since 1998.  We watch almost every game on TV.   It's been a long time since the Padres made the playoffs, and they've been to the World Series only twice, in 1984 and 1998.  Hope still springs eternal every spring. 

Other sports?  In the fall, we played touch and flag football at Grape Street Park - I was usually a quarterback.  We also threw the football on 30th street in between cars and buses rumbling by.  The Chargers came to town in 1961, and I've been a devoted fan ever since.  Before we had children, we had season tickets for a few years.  Now I just watch on TV since the damn owners moved the team out of town.  

Bowling.  As a teen, I started bowling at Aztec Bowl, and by the time I was a young adult I had a 180 average.  After marriage, I didn't bowl very much and now not at all because it hurts my sliding knee. 

Basketball?  In school, my friends and I stopped at the church playground after school and played, but I was always really small and not quick enough.  No big loss IMHO.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

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Surname Saturday -- GIBSON (England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.

I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2169 who is Rebecca GIBSON (1634-????). [Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through two generations in this GIBSON family line is:

1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

66.  Nathan Gates (1767-1830)
67.  Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)

134.  Jeremiah Knowlton (1745-1785)
135.  Abigail Peirce (1750-1775)

270.  Samuel Peirce (1712-1772)
271.  Abigail Stearns (1715-1798)


542.  George Stearns (1690-1760)
543.  Hannah Sanderson (1689-1770)

1084.  John Stearns (1647-1722)
1085.  Judith Lawrence (1660-1713)

2168.  Charles Stearns, born before 07 January 1616 in Fordham, Essex, England; died about 1695 in Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 4336. Charles Stearns and 4337. Martha Lasall.  He married  22 June 1654 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
2169.  Rebecca Gibson, born about 1634 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. 

Children of Charles Stearns and Rebecca Gibson are:
*  Shubael Stearns (1655-1734), married 1682 Mary Upton (1665-????).
John Stearns (1657-1722), married (1) 1681 Judith Lawrence (1660-1713), (2) 1713 Mary Norcross (1663-????).
*  Isaac Stearns (1658-1692), married 1684 Hannah Beckett (1660-1694).
*  Charles Stearns (1660-1695).
*  Rebecca Stearns (1661-1746), married 1693 Thomas Traine (1653-1739).
*  Martha Stearns (1663-1708), married 1690 Francis Hutchinson (1620-1702).

4338.  John Gibson, born about 1601 in England; died after 1688 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He married before 1634 in probably Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
4339.  Rebecca LNU, born about 1613 in England; died 01 December 1661 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of John Gibson and Rebecca are:

Rebecca Gibson (1634-????), married 1654 Charles Stearns (1616-1695).
*  Mary Gibson (1638-1674), married 1655 John Ruggles (1633-1713).
*  Martha Gibson (1639-1727), married 1657 Jacob Newell (1634-1678).
*  John Gibson (1641-1679), married 1668 Rebecca Errington (1650-1713).
*  Samuel Gibson (1644-1710), married (1) 1668 Sarah Pemberton (1638-1676); (2) 1679 Elizabeth Remington (1648-1680); (3) 1690 Abigail LNU (1647-1710).

Information about the Gibson family was obtained from:

*  Frederick Clifford Pierce, "
The Gibson Family of Cambridge," New England Historic Genealogical Register, Volume 37, number 4 (October 1883), pages 388 ff.  

I have done no original research for this surname line.


==============================================

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

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Friday, October 12, 2018

Genealogy News Bytes - 12 October 2018


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


 
Most People of European Ancestry Can Be Identified From a Relative’s DNA

*  German Genealogy Worldwide: 1st Board of the International German Genealogy Partnership is Elected

2)  New or Updated Record Databases:

*  
New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 12 October 2018

*  New & Updated Databases Posted at FamilySearch September 1 through October 11, 2018

*  October Update: GenealogyBank Just Added New Content from 51 Titles!

3)  Genealogy Education:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar


*  Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for October 2018

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 16 October, 5 p.m. PDT:  Using Emigrant Guides for Genealogical Research, by Julie Miller

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 17 October, 11 a.m. PDT:  Ho to California! The Draw of the Gold Rush, by Peggy Clemens Lauritzen

*  Upcoming SCGS Webinar - Wednesday, 17 October, 6 p.m. PDT:  The Y-DNA Test Should Be Your Favorite, by Diahan Southard

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  In Search of My Brother's Mother - An Adoption Story, by Beth Foulk

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Strategies for Using FamilySearch,by Shannon Combs-Bennett

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Rich Resources for Poor Ancestors, by Gail Blankenau

*  Who Is Nicka Smith? YouTube:  BlackProGen LIVE!: Ep 69: Biology of a Document: From Analysis to Plan

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Use Land Records to Research AROUND the 1890 Census in Genealogy

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Did You do a Reasonably Exhaustive Search to Research AROUND the 1890 Census Loss in Genealogy?

*  The In-Depth Genealogist YouTube:  Dread the Red

*  The In-Depth Genealogist YouTube:  Relative Race, Season 4 - Episode 2

*  Extreme Genes YouTube:  Fisher’s Top Tips #009 - Old Family Stories Are Wonderful Tales…But That’s Often All They Are

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, October 12,  2018


5)  DNA Stories:

*  DNA evidence links Muhammad Ali to heroic slave, family says

*  Long Lost Sibling Reunites with Family After 45 Years

6)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 9 October 2018?

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.