Saturday, September 22, 2018

Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 16 to 22 September 2018

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at   FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 22 September 2018, there were 2,375 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 5 from last week):

The deleted. added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Added   ---

*  France, Calvados, Military Registration Cards, 1867-1921        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2815120); 94,106 indexed records with 94,106 record images, ADDED 17 Sep 2018

Virginia, Petersburg, Gillfield Baptist Church Record, 1827-1906        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2842085); 15,162 indexed records with 15,162 record images, ADDED 19 Sep 2018

Australia, South Australia, School Admission Registers, 1873-1985       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2862204); 89,801 indexed records with 89,801 record images, ADDED 19 Sep 2018

Oregon, Lane County, Marriage Records, 1852-1921        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2848497); 1,462 indexed records with 1,462 record images, ADDED 19 Sep 2018

--- Collections Updated ---

Montana, Toole County Records, 1913-1960        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2138517); 4,561 indexed records with 79,300 record images (was 0 records with 79,300 images), Updated 17 Sep 2018

United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,168,489 indexed records with 46,885,712 record images (was 34,168,489 records with 46,885,712 images), Updated 20 Sep 2018

Sweden, Household Examination Books, 1880-1930  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2790465); 46,977,151 indexed records with 87,177 record images (was 46,977,151 records with 87,177 images), Updated 18 Sep 2018

Pennsylvania, Philadelphia City Births, 1860-1906       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1951739); 1,287,391 indexed records with 139,194 record images (was 1,022,168 records with 139,194 images), Updated 18 Sep 2018

Maine, Knox County Cemetery Records, ca. 1800-2007      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1766753); 12,156 indexed records with 3,878 record images (was 0 records with 3,878 images), Updated 19 Sep 2018

*  Lesotho, Evangelical Church Records, 1828-2005  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2146157); 100,266 indexed records with 20,396 record images (was 29,900 records with 20,396 images), Updated 17 Sep 2018

Liberia, Marriage Records, 1912-2015    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2100287); 126,290 indexed records with 24,406 record images (was 104,292 records with 24,406 images), Updated 20 Sep 2018

England and Wales, National Index of Wills and Administrations, 1858-1957       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2451051); Index only (4,885,194 records), no images (was 1,024,884 records with 0 images), Updated 17 Sep 2018

Colombia, Catholic Church Records, 1576-2017    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1726975); 3,018,040 indexed records with 12,555,984 record images (was 3,017,668 records with 12,555,984 images), Updated 17 Sep 2018

New Hampshire, Hillsborough County, Manchester, Cemetery Records, 1800-2007     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1930346); 38,819 indexed records with 50,399 record images (was 0 records with 50,399 images), Updated 19 Sep 2018

England, Devon and Cornwall Marriages, 1660-1912        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1833719); 92,683 indexed records with 4,692 record images (was 74,756 records with 4,692 images), Updated 20 Sep 2018

Argentina, Santa Fe, Catholic Church Records, 1634-1975 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1974196); 1,015,996 indexed records with 424,329 record images (was 954,574 records with 424,329 images), Updated 18 Sep 2018

Georgia, Fulton County Records from the Atlanta History Center, 1827-1955       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2125026); 87,899 indexed records with 35,684 record images (was 74,868 records with 35,684 images), Updated 18 Sep 2018

Virginia, Fluvanna County Colbert Funeral Home Records, 1929-1976       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1344895); 2,942 indexed records with 1,866 record images (was 0 records with 1,866 images), Updated 21 Sep 2018

United States, Native American, Census Rolls, 1885-1940 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2761958); Index only (246,263 records), no images (was 246,263 records with 12,842 images), Updated 20 Sep 2018

Texas, Swisher County Records, 1879-2012        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2103490); 8,910 indexed records with 93,603 record images (was 6,320 records with 93,603 images), Updated 18 Sep 2018

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In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner and use keywords (e.g. "church england") to find collections with those keywords.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

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Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - What Is Your Earliest Memory?

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It's Saturday Night again - 

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!



Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1) 
What is your earliest memory?  How old were you, where did you live, who are the characters in your memory?


2)  Tell us in your own blog post, in a comment to this post, or on Facebook or Google+.  Please leave a comment on this post with a link to your post.

Thank you to Janice Sellers for suggesting this topic.  If you have an idea for an SNGF topic, please let me know.  

Here's mine:

My earliest vivid memory is of my baby brother Stan coming home from the hospital in September 1946.  I was almost 3 years old.  We lived on the ground floor of a two-story apartment house at 2114 Fern Street in San Diego and I recall seeing my mother hold the door and my father enter holding baby Stan.  

My life changed!  My Carringer grandparents (Lyle and Emily) switched their attention from me to Stan, my mother was busy with the baby, and my father was always working.  I spent a lot of time outside playing in my grandparents greenhouse and back yard - I think my grandmother watched over me many days so that my mother could nurture the baby.  In November, my great-grandfather, Henry Austin Carringer, died and my grandparents had to deal with that.  

The apartment at 2114 Fern was small - just two bedrooms, a bath room, a kitchen, and a living room.  A garage took up half of the ground floor.  I think we moved upstairs for a year or two to 2116 Fern, which was bigger.  By 1948, we moved to the even larger upstairs apartment at 2119 30th Street on the same block.  My grandparents moved into 2115 30th Street in the first floor apartment which was the original 1895 house.  They sold the Fern Street house and built the Point Loma house in 1951.  My parents lived in the 2119 30th Street apartment until 1978 when my grandparents died, and they moved to the Point Loma house.  They eventually sold all of the property on the block in the early 1980s.


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The URL for this post is: 

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Surname Saturday -- KING (England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.

I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2155 who is Mary KING (1630-1715). [Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through two generations in this KING family line is:

1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

66.  Nathan Gates (1767-1830)
67.  Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)

134.  Jeremiah Knowlton (1745-1785)
135.  Abigail Peirce (1750-1775)

268.  Jeremiah Knowlton (1713-1752)
269.  Sarah Allen (1717-1796)


538.  Thomas Allen (1690-1777)
539.  Sarah Grande (1691-????)

1076.  Benjamin Allen (1662-1721)
1077.  Frances Rice (1671-1721)


2154.  Thomas Rice, born before 26 January 1626 in Stanstead, Suffolk, England; died 16 November 1681 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 4308. Edmund Rice and 4309. Thomasine Frost.  He married about 1651 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
2155.  Mary King, born before 12 February 1630 in Shaston, Dorset, England; died 22 March 1715 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States. 

Children of Thomas Rice and Mary King are:
*  Grace Rice (1653-1654).
*  Thomas Rice (1654-????), married (1) Mary (1655-1677); (2) 1681 Anna Rice (1661-1731).
*  Mary Rice (1656-1733), married (1) 1678 Josiah White (1643-1714); (2) 1718 Thomas Sawyer (1649-1736).
*  Peter Rice (1658-1753), married 1688 Rebecca How (1668-1749).
*  Nathaniel Rice (1660-1726), married (1) 1681 Sarah Stone (1660-1702); (2) 1704 Patience Brown (1672-1722).
*  Sarah Rice (1662-1726), married 1678 William Adams (1647-1728).
*  Ephraim Rice (1665-1732), married (1) 1689 Hannah Livermore (1670-1724); (2) 1725 Mary Noyes (1662-1744).
*  Gershom Rice (1667-1768), married 1696 Elizabeth Balcom (1672-????).
*  James Rice (1670-1730), married 1694 Sarah Stone (1675-1730).
Frances Rice (1671-1721), married 1690 Benjamin Allen (1662-1721).
*  Jonas Rice (1673-1753), married 1702 Mary Stone (1677-1764).
*  Grace Rice (1675-1768), married 1702 Nathaniel Moore (1677-1761).
*  Elisha Rice (1679-1761), married 1708 Elizabeth Wheeler (1669-1744).

4310.  Thomas King, born about 1600 in Shaftesbury, Dorset, England; died before 24 March 1676 in Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He married about 1624 in Shaftesbury, Dorset, England.
4311.  Anne LNU, born about 1600 in England; died 24 December 1642 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of Thomas King and Anne are:
*  Anna King (1625-1698), married 1646 William Kerley (1604-1683).
*  Peter King (1628-1704), married Sarah Rice (1635-1706).
Mary King (1630-1715), married 1651 Thomas Rice (1626-1681).
*  Sarah King (1632-1706), married 1656 Nathaniel Joslin (1627-1694).
*  Elizabeth King (1635-1667), married 1655 Samuel Rice (1634-1685).
*  Mercy King (1638-1669), married 1658 Joseph Rice (1638-1711).
*  Thomas King (1642-1643).

Information about the Thomas King genealogy was obtained from:

*  
Mary Lovering Holman, The Ancestry of Colonel John Harrington Stevens and his wife Frances Helen Miller (Concord NH : Rumford Press, 1948) 

*  Rev. Alfred Sereno Hudson, Annals of Sudbury, Wayland, and Maynard, Middlesex County, Massachusetts (Ayer, Mass. : the author, 1891).

*  Frederick C. Warner, The Warner,Harrington Ancestry (Boston, the author, 1949, on FHL microfilm 186,101).

*  George A. Davis, Davis and Fifty Allied Families of New England (Augusta, Me. : The Kennebex Journal, 1956).

I have done no original research for this person.
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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, September 21, 2018

Genealogy News Bytes - 21 September 2018


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


RootsTech 2019 SLC Opens for Registration


*  19 October 2018 is BCG Free Day of Quality Genealogy Education

*  
Peoplelegacy.com Appropriating Content from Find-A-Grave

*  Announcing Generations Cafe – a Genealogy Podcast

*  Ancestry.com changed how it determines ethnicity and people are upset

2)  New or Updated Record Databases:

*  
Findmypast’s Catholic Heritage Archive grows again!

*  New Naval Records Added to Fold3!

3)  Genealogy Education:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar


*  ISBGFH announces fall line-up of free genealogy webinars

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinars - Tuesday, 25 September, 11 a.m. PDT:  Importance of Newspapers for family research, by Daniel Horowitz

*  Archived Family Tree Webinars:  Using Lists to Find Proof, by Cari Taplin

*  Archived Family Tree Webinars: 25 Simple Research Hacks Every Genealogist Should Know, by Lisa Alzo


*  Archived Family Tree Webinars:  Finding Kentucky Land: Grants, Deeds and the Missing Pieces

*  Generations Cafe Podcast:  Is Perfectionism Ruining Your Genealogy?

*  Generations Cafe Podcast:  Finding All of the Daughters in the Family Tree

*  Generations Cafe Podcast:  4 Things You Should Do With Every Genealogy Source

*  Fisher’s Top Tips Podcast:  #003 – Keeping Your Ancestral Photos Safe

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  Researching AROUND the Missing 1890 Census | 1890 FRAGMENTS in Genealogy

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube: Using State Census Records - Researching AROUND the Missing 1890 Census in Genealogy

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube:  DNA Q&A - Fanatical Friday Live!

*  Ancestry YouTube:  Genealogy Jargon Defined | Ancestry

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  Using Multiple Online Genealogy Programs to Find Your Ancestors - James Tanner

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube:  BYU Technology Lab - Mark Clement (6 Sep 2018 -30 min)

*  Family History Ron YouTube:  Q&A September 13 2018

*  FamilySearch YouTube:  Road to RootsTech, Episode 3: Registration for RootsTech is Open!

*  The In-Depth Genealogist YouTube:  Season 4 of Relative Race Begins

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, September 21,  2018


FREE DOWNLOAD FRIDAYS: Google Books for Genealogy Cheat Sheet

5)  DNA Success Stories:

*   A Man Says His DNA Test Proves He’s Black, and He’s Suing

*  Gone Daddy, Part III: Family revealed, secrets uncovered

*  Siblings from across the pond find each other after 55 years

6)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 18 September 2018?

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

PeopleLegacy.com Blatantly Copies Most of the FindAGrave.com Content

It's deja vu all over again.  One website copies the content from another website and hopes for more traffic.  This time, it's the data on a really big website (FindaGrave.com), owned by a major genealogy provider (Ancestry.com), that was copied.  Pass the popcorn - how long will it take for PeopleLegacy.com to be taken down, and probably penalized?

There were tweets and Facebook posts yesterday about this, and a number of readers and posters were aggravated that their family photographs and cemetery photographs had been smeared over with a PeopleLegacy watermark.  Aggravate your potential customers much?

The two blog posts I've read so far are:

*  Peoplelegacy.com Appropriating Content from Find-A-Grave by Thomas MacEntee on the Abundant Genealogy blog.  Thomas advocates letting Ancestry.com do the work here rather than have thousands of persons waste the time of lawyers and such.

*  No, Find-A-Grave Wasn’t Exactly “Hacked” by Dick Eastman on the Eastman's Online Genealogy Newsletter blog.  Dick provides a link to a website that can be used to capture website content.

Here is the PeopleLegacy.com home page:


Here is the page for one of my ancestors (two images):


Note the watermark over all of the photographs.

Here is the Find A Grave memorial for the same person:


The information provided is identical between the two sites.  The contributor of the photograph is "Anonymous."

The photograph of Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) shown is from my family photograph archives - I posted it Family Photographs - Post 29: Thomas Richmond on 12 November 2008.  The photos used on FindAGrave and PeopleLegacy have been edited a bit by somebody.

My guess is that the Over/Under bet on the date that the PeopleLegacy.com site disappears forever from the Internet is 1 October.  What do you think?

It will be interesting to see how much in damages Ancestry.com asks for in their lawsuit, and how much they ultimately receive, and how long it takes for all of this to happen.

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 244: #369 Deliverance (--?--) Oatley (1700-1733) of Washington County, Rhode Island

Deliverance (--?--)  Oatley (about 1700 - about 1733) is #369 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married #368 Jonathan Oatley (1689-1755in about 1726 in Rhode Island.

I am descended through:

*  their son, #184 Benedict Oatley (1732-1821) who married #185 Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814) in 1755.
*   their son #92 Joseph Oatley (1756 - 1815) who married #93 Mary Hazard (1765-1857)  in 1781.
*  their son #46 Jonathan Oatley (1791-1872), who married #47 Amy Champlin (1798-1865) in 1813.
*  their daughter #23 Amy Oatley (1826-1864), who married  #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) in 1844.
*  their daughter #11 Julia E. White (1848-1913) who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) in 1868.
*  their daughter #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
*  Name:                 Deliverance --?-- [1]    

*  Sex:                    Female  

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Birth:                  about 1700, Rhode Island, United States    

*  Death:                about 1733 (about age 33), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[2]  

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Spouse 1.             Jonathan Oatley (1689-1755)    

*  Marriage 1:          before 1726 (before about age 26), Rhode Island, United States[1]    

**  Child 1:             Samuel Oatley (1726-1794)    
**  Child 2:             Rebecca Oatley (1728-1806)    
**  Child 3:             Rhoda Oatley (1730-1757)    
**  Child 4:             Benedict Oatley (1732-1821)    

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

The Oatley Family Association of Providence, Rhode Island published The Oatley Family in
America and their Descendants in 1969-70[1]. The sketch for Jonathan Oatley indicates his first wife's
name was Deliverance.[1] The birth date, birth place and parentage of Deliverance --?--, the first wife of Jonathan Oatley, is not
known. See the Research Notes below. Deliverance may have been born between 1685 and 1710, perhaps in England or in New England.  
She could have been born in England and migrated as a young wife with Jonathan before they had
children in Rhode Island. A birth date of about 1700 in Rhode Island is probable. She may have married Jonathan Oatley (1689-1755) before 1726, when her first recorded child was
born in South Kingstown, Rhode Island. Jonathan and Deliverance had four children: * Samuel Oatley (1726-1794), married 1771 Abigail Nichols (1737-1787). * Rebecca Oatley (1728-1806), married 1745 Michael Champlin (1723-1786). * Rhoda Oatley (1730-1757), married 1750 Ephraim Drake (1730-????). * Benedict Oatley (1732-1821), married 1755 Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814). Deliverance Oatley died after the birth of Benedict in December 1732 and well before the birth of
Jonathan's first child, Jonathan, by his second wife in 1737. The death date is estimated to be 1733. No death date, death place, or burial place for Deliverance (--?--) Oatley are known. There are no
known probate records. Research Notes: Some family tree databases indicate that Deliverance, the wife of Jonathan Oatley of South
Kingstown, RI, was born 16 March 1703, the daughter of Deliverance and Mary (Bates) Cleveland,
who resided in North Kingstown, Rhode Island, for some time in the early 1700's. The source for
this is Family Group Sheets submitted by an LDS Member to the International Genealogical Index
after 1991 (no further source given). There is also an entry in the LDS Ancestral File with the same
information submitted by Geraldine Smith Wood (629 Dixie Lane, South Daytona FL 32119
(Submission: AF97-123112)
If this entry is correct, then the father Deliverance Cleveland was the son of Edward and  
Deliverance (Palmer) Cleveland who resided in North Kingstown and moved to Windham
County CT around 1709. Edward Cleveland was the son of Moses and Ann (Winn) Cleveland
of Woburn MA. He died in 1748 in Pomfret, Windham County, Connecticut. One online site that seems to have sourced information is the "Our Ancestors and Cousins" site
developed by Stephen Griffiths.  The page for Moses Cleveland (1619-1701) lists Edward
Cleveland (1664-1746) who married Deliverance Palmer (1665-1717);  Edward and Deliverance
Cleveland had a son Deliverance Cleveland (1684-1744), who married in about 1707 to Mary --?--
(about 1690 - ????), but there is no indication of a daughter named Deliverance. The book by James Butler Cleveland, A genealogical register of the descendants of Moses
Cleveland of Woburn, Mass., an immigrant in 1635 from England, with a sketch of the Clevelands
of Virginia and the Carolinas (Albany, N.Y., Munsell, Printer, 1881) (accessed on FamilySearch
Books), indicates that: The extract of the will of Edward Cleveland (1664-1748), written in 1744, lists the heirs of his son,
Deliverance Cleveland, as Josiah, Mary, Hannah, Enoch and Elizabeth. No daughter Deliverance is
mentioned nor are Oatley grandchildren listed, although she would have been dead when Edward
Cleveland wrote his will in 1744.
I reviewed the first four generations of the Cleveland book, and did not see another female
Deliverance who could be the spouse of Jonathan Oatley.   Based on all of the above, I have not added Deliverance Cleveland as the wife of Jonathan Oatley
(1689-1755) of South Kingstown, Rhode Island.
 
5)  SOURCES

1. Harry J. Oatley, The Oatley Family in America and Their Descendants (Providence, R.I. : The Oatley Family Association, 1970), Pages 19-25, Jonathan Oatley sketch.

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NOTE:  In 2014, Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2018 to 260 Ancestors in 260 Weeks.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, September 20, 2018

Seavers in the News- Mrs. A.H. Seaver Dies in 1956 in Milwaukee

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Eau Claire (Wis.] Leader-Telegram newspaper dated 2 May 1956:


The transcription of the first obituary is:

"Former Augusta Woman Dies in Milwaukee

"Leader & Telegram News
AUGUSTA -- Mrs. A.H. Seaver, a resident of Augusta for many years, died at a private nursing home in Milwaukee on April 25.

"Mr. and Mrs. Seaver moved from here about six years ago.  Mr. Seaver died at the nursing home in September, 1954.

"Mrs. Seaver is survived by three daughters, Mrs. James Ross of Judith Gap, Mont., Mrs. George Anderson of Billings, Mont., and Mrs. Will Wilson of Bison, S.D.; a son, Leonard of Milwaukee; and several grandchildren and great-grandchildren.

"Funeral services were held from a funeral home in Milwaukee on April 27.  Burial was in a cemetery at Maquoketa, Iowa."

The source citation for this article is:

"Former Augusta Woman Dies in Milwaukee,Eau Claire [Wis.] Telegram-Leader newspaper, dated 2 May 1956, page 3, column 2, Mrs. A.H. Seaver obituary; digital image, Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com :  accessed 20 September 2018).

There are several clues as to the name of Mrs. A.H. Seaver.  The best clue was the name of the son - Leonard.  I searched all of the Leonard Seavers in my RootsMagic family tree database, and found one, born in 1910, as the son of Adello Harden Seaver and Mary Elizabeth Liddle.  I also had the three daughters in my database married to the named husbands.

So, Mrs. A.H. Seaver is Mary Elizabeth (Liddle) Seaver (born 18 July 1869 in Princeton, New York, died 25 April 1956 in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  She married, on 18 August 1894 in Ames, Iowa, to Adello Harden Seaver was born 27 March 1872 in Maquoketa, Iowa, and died 3 September 1954, apparently in Milwaukee, Wisconsin.  Their four children were:

*  Vivian Marie Seaver (1896-1999), who married 1918 to William Hannon Wilson (1891-1972).
*  Gertrude Seaver (1897-1987), who married 1918 to James Malcolm Ross (1892-1980).
*  Ruith E. Seaver (1901-1994), who married 1921 to George L. Anderson (1900-1974).
*  Leonard William Seaver (1910-1992), who married 1935 to Hope Eugenia Pettis (1915-1978).

I don't have any information about children or grandchildren of the children of Adello Harden and Mary Elizabeth (Liddle) Seaver.

Adello Harden Seaver is my 5th cousin 4 times removed.  I also found his 1954 obituary in the Eau Claire newspaper which provided his first name and his wife's name, plus the first names of his daughters.  

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

RootsTech 2019 SLC Opens for Registration

I received this information from FamilySearch and RootsTech today:

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RootsTech 2019 SLC Opens for Registration




Salt Lake City, Utah (20 September 2018), FamilySearch International has announced that registration for RootsTech 2019 Salt Lake City is now open. RootsTech is a popular 4-day annual family history and technology conference where individuals and families are inspired to discover, share, and preserve their family roots, heritage, and stories. The 2019 conference will be held February 27–March 2, 2019, at the Salt Palace Convention Center in Salt Lake City, Utah. For more information, visit RootsTech.org.

In 2018, the event attracted more than 27,000 attendees from all 50 U.S. states and 47 different countries.

RootsTech 2019 will offer attendees a full lineup of inspiring and well-known keynote speakers; over 300 informative sessions, including hands-on computer lab classes taught by industry professionals; interactive activities and helpful exhibitors in the expo hall; and entertaining evening events—all designed to inspire and empower personal family discoveries.

Updates to the Conference Format

RootsTech 2019 officially begins on Wednesday, February 27, with class sessions beginning at 9:30 a.m. The Wednesday general session will begin on the main stage at 4:30 p.m. Steve Rockwood, CEO of FamilySearch International, will be the keynote speaker. Following Rockwood’s address will be the opening event. Following the opening event, the expo hall will open from 6–8 p.m. to allow attendees uninterrupted time in the expo hall to meet with vendors.

A fifth class session time is also being added to the RootsTech schedule. On Thursday, Friday, and Saturday, “power hour” classes will be held from 8–9 a.m. Power hour classes will feature three different presenters in each room who will teach about similar topics for 20 minutes each. These sessions are designed to allow attendees to learn a new skill, method, or application that can be applied to their own family history efforts.

General keynote sessions on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday will begin on the main stage at 11 a.m. instead of 8:30 a.m. as in years past. These general sessions will lead directly into the lunch hour.

In an effort to reduce the amount of time spent standing in lines, RootsTech has announced a number of logistical updates to the conference including: no badge scanning at classroom doors, adjustments to classroom sizes, and a new area for check-in. Read more about these updates here.

Pricing

Early bird discount pricing is available for a limited time on 4-day passes at just $189 (a $110 discount on regularly priced passes). Single day RootsTech passes are also available for $99. Both one-day and full conference passes include access to the popular expo hall and keynote sessions. Early bird pricing ends October 12, 2018.

Family Discovery Day

Registration for Family Discovery Day is also now open. The event takes place on Saturday, March 2, 2019, and is designed for families and members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. This free 1-day event includes inspiring messages from Church leaders; engaging classes for families, youth, and young single adults; and evening entertainment to inspire and help families make family history connections. Family Discovery Day attendees will also have access to all the interactive activities and exhibitors found in the RootsTech expo hall. Event details, including speakers and class sessions, will be made available soon at RootsTech.org. Registration is required.

Find and share this announcement online in the FamilySearch Newsroom


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About RootsTech

RootsTech, hosted by FamilySearch, is a global conference celebrating families across generations, where people of all ages are inspired to discover and share their memories and connections. This annual event has become the largest of its kind in the world, attracting tens of thousands of participants worldwide.

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Disclosure:  I am a RootsTech 2019 Ambassador, and receive a complimentary registration for the conference in return for publicizing and reporting on the conference.  I will be offering a free registration for RootsTech 2019 on my blog in the near future.



Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

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