Thursday, December 2, 2021

Seavers in the News - Mrs. Edith Seaver Dies in 1959 in Woodstock, Vermont

 It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Rutland [Vt.] Daily Herald newspaper dated 12 March 1959:

The transcription of the article is:

"MRS. EDITH SEAVER

"Woodstock -- Services for Mrs. Edith Duel Seaver, who died Tuesday, will be held Friday at 2:30 p.m. in the Woodstock Universalist Church, the Rev. Mounir Saa'dah officiating.  Burial will be in Taftsville.

"Mrs. Seaver was born Oct. 20, 1887, in Granville, N.Y.

"She leaves her husband, Maurice Seaver; four sons, Lt. Col. Philip R. Seaver of Aberdeen Proving Grounds, Md., Maj. Owen L. Seaver of Mt. Clemens, Mich., Charles D. Seaver of Syracuse, N.Y., and Capt. Maurice E. Seaver of Mesa, Ariz.; 12 grandchildren; a sister, Miss Laura Duel of Brooklyn; and a brother, Leon Duel of Hartford, N.Y.

"The family has requested that in lieu of flowers contributions be made to the Ottauquechee Health Center Inc. of Woodstock."

The source citation is:

"Mrs. Edith Seaver,Rutland [Vt.] Daily Herald  newspaper, Thursday, 12 March 1959, page 7, column 5, Edith Duel Seaver obituary; Newspapers.com   (https://www.newspapers.com : accessed 2 December  2021).

This obituary provides the name, birth date and place, death date and place, children names, spouse's name, but no occupation or associations.

Edith Mary Duel was born 20 October 1887 in Granville, New York, the daughter of Charles H. and Caroline Elizabeth (Parsons) Duel.  She died 10 March 1959, probably in Woodstock, Vermont.  She married Maurice Elmer Seaver (1887-1959) on 29 January 1914 in Proctor, Vermont.  They had five children:

*  Irene Marjorie Seaver (1914-1918)
*  Philip Randal Seaver (1917-1992), married 1944 Mary Key Fullerton (1916-1992)
*  Owen L. Seaver (1919-1978), married 1943 Enith Blodget (1921-2017).
*  Charles Duel Seaver (1925-2005), married 1948 Catharine Anne Clark (1926-2008).
*  Maurice Elmer Seaver (1928-1997), married Lenore Jean Miller (1934-????)

Maurice Elmer Seaver (1887-1959) is my 6th cousin 3 times removed.  Our common Seaver ancestor is Shubael Seaver (1640-1730) of Roxbury, Massachusetts.

There are over 10,000 Seaver "stories" in my family tree - and this was one of them.   Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and sometimes a person's obituary has fairly complete family information. I am glad that I can honor Edith Mary (Duel) Seaver today.  

You never know when a descendant or relative will find this blog post and learn something about their ancestors or relatives, or will provide more information about them to me.

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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

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Treasure Chest Thursday -- Sara Davis 1675 Birth Record in Lynn, Massachusetts

 It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1675 birth entry for Sara Davis in the Lynn, Massachusetts town vital  records book:

The birth entry is 6th entry in the Davis section on this page:

The transcription of this record is:

"[DAVIS] Sara, d. John, 'beginning of'' 12 m: 1675.  CT.R."

The source citation for this record is:

 Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts to the end of the Year 1849 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1906), 2 Volumes, Births, page 128, Sara Davis entry, "beginning of" 12m 1675.

The date in this record is almost certainly to be "Old Style" where the 12th month is February.  So the birth date is probably "about 1 February 1675/6."

This is an entry in the printed town vital records book for Lynn, Massachusetts.  It is probably an Derivative Source, with Primary Information and Direct Evidence of this birth.  

Sarah Davis (1676-1754) was the daughter of John and Sarah (Kirtland) of Lynn.  She married Michael Bowden (1673-1741), the son of Michael and Sarah (Nurse) Bowden of Marblehead, Massachusetts Bay after 20 November 1697 (intentions) in Lynn.  

Michael and Sarah (Davis) Bowden are my 7th great-grandparents through their daughter Mary Bowden (1705-1755) who married Joseph Richards  (1703-1748) in 1726 in Lynn, Massachusetts Bay.

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Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

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Wednesday, December 1, 2021

Rabbit Hole Genealogy Fun - Death Record of Irene Albina Marano in Capestrano, Italy

 I had a free hour this morning to have some genealogy fun, and I wondered if FamilySearch had records for my grandsons Italian ancestors.  They are all in the FamilySearch Family Tree, and in my Ancestry Member Tree, and also in several other Ancestry trees.  But I was looking for records of birth/baptism, marriage, and death/burial for sourcing to original records for the persons involved..

When I clicked on my grandsons' 3rd great-grandfather Carlo Giuseppe Cerasoli (1840-????) of Capestrano, L'Aquila, Italy,  profile in the FamilySearch Family Tree, I clicked on the FamilySearch search link to find records for him.  One of those records was the death record for his wife, Irene Albina Marano, in which he was listed as a spouse.  Here is the index record for the death record of Irene Marano:

The source citation provided by FamilySearch is:

"Italia, L'Aquila, Stato Civile (Archivio di Stato), 1809-1865, 1911-1943," database with images,   FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:QK1T-SWPZ : 17 March 2018), Carlo Cerasoli in entry for Irene Albina Marano, 14 Dec 1914; citing Death, Capestrano, L'Aquila, Italy, certificate, archivio di Stato di L'Aquila (L'Aquila State Archives), Italy; FHL microfilm 100523126.

This record states that Irene Albina Marano died 14 December 1914 in Capestrano, L'Aquila, Italy at age 76, and her husband was Carlo Cerasoli. It shows that Irene's parents are Giademenico Marano and Giustina Cerasoli.  

The original image of the record is not available to me at home in the FamilySearch record collections or in digital microfilm, but it is available at the local Family History Center in the Family History Catalog as digital microfilm.

Then I remembered that the Italian Civil Records for this time period are on the Antenati website (https://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/) - could I find it?  On the Antenati site, I searched by her name, Capestrano and 1914 and was rewarded by:


And there is the actual page with the death record at the bottom of the image above:

Irene's death record is the first record on this page.  Here is my first attempt at a source citation for the image:

Gli Archivi per la Recerca Anagrafica, indexed records with record indexes, Portale Antenati (https://www.antenati.san.beniculturali.it/ : accessed 30 November 2021), Archivio di Stato dell'Aquila, Stato civile italiano > Capestrano > 1914, Morti, page 15, Irene Albina Marano death entry, 14 December 1914.

Italian death records are wonderful because they give the husband's name and usually the parents names. The real finds here are Irene's death date and her parent's names - Giandemonico Marano and Giustina Cerasoli.  I also found Carlo Cerasoli's death record in 1911 in Capestrano in another record not listed in the FamilySearch database for some reason.

I don't know who Carlo Giuseppe Cerasoli's parents are, but it appears that he married his cousin of some degree (likely a first or second cousin).

I need to have more genealogy fun like this every day!  Sometimes you get the rabbit and sometimes the rabbit gets you - this time, I won.

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The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2021/12/rabbit-hole-genealogy-fun-death-record.html

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

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Free Access to U.S. City Directories on MyHeritage, 2-7 December 2021

 I received this information from Daniel Horowitz at MyHeritage today:

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I’m delighted to tell you that from December 2–7, 2021, MyHeritage is offering free access to one of our most important historical record collections: U.S. City Directories.





The U.S. City Directories collection contains over 561 million records in 26,000 public U.S. city directories published between 1860 and 1960. They typically include names, names of spouses, addresses, occupations, and workplaces, which makes them a rich source of information about family members in the United States — especially as an alternative to missing or destroyed census records. The MyHeritage collection is especially valuable because of its advanced indexing and multiple record consolidation, which make it much easier to find what you’re looking for and track your ancestors’ progress over time.

This is amazing news for anyone looking to dig deeper into their roots in the United States. You are welcome to search the collection now and check out the blog post to learn more. Feel free to use the attached graphic when spreading the word.

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Disclosure:  I receive a complimentary subscription to MyHeritage, and gave received other material consideration in past years.  I uploaded my autosomal DNA raw data to their DNA product.  This does not affect my objective analysis of MyHeritage products.

The URL for this post is: https://www.geneamusings.com/2021/12/free-access-to-us-city-directories-on.html

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Cousins At the Seaver Gravestone in Evergreen Cemetery in Leominster, Mass. -- Post 696 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

  I can't help it, I can't do a wordless post! This is one of my favorite photographs: 

Linda and I took a vacation to New England in July 2004.  My uncle, Edward Richmond Seaver (1913-2004) died 14 February 2004 in Arizona, and the family gathered in Leominster, Massachusetts to bury him in Evergreen Cemetery with his late wife, Janet (Roukes) Seaver.  We eulogized him in the chapel in the cemetery and then visited the graves of our Seaver ancestors in this cemetery.  It was a beautiful summer day and we celebrated the life of Ed in fine fashion.

The photo above shows six of the eleven cousins descended from grandparents Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) and Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) of Leominster.  From the left:

*  Joanie - daughter of Edward and Janet (Roukes) Seaver.
*  Judy - daughter of Bowers and Ruth (Seaver) Fischer.
*  Virginia - daughter of Walter and Evelyn (Seaver) Wood.
*  Peter - son of Edward and Janet (Roukes) Seaver.
*  Randy - son of Frederick and Betty (Carringer) Seaver.
*  Barbie - daughter of Bowers and Ruth (Seaver) Fischer.

Edward Richmond Seaver was my only Seaver uncle, and I loved this man so much.  He was a Columbia football player, a U.S. Navy captain, and a fine and fun-loving man.  

On this trip, we took the time to visit with the cousins, and stayed with Virginia for several days in Salem, New Hampshire in her 1700's era salt-box house.  

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Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post. Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below. Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Tuesday, November 30, 2021

Genealogy News and Education Bytes -- Tuesday, 30 November 2021

Welcome to Genealogy News and Education Bytes, posted on Tuesday afternoon and Friday afternoon, where we try to highlight the most important genealogy and family history news and education items that came across our desktop since the last issue.    


1)  News Articles:







2)  New or Updated Record Collections:






3)  Genealogy Education -- Conferences and Institutes




4)  Genealogy Education - Seminars, Webinars and Online Classes (times are US Pacific):


*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 30 November, 5 p.m.:  Genealogy a la carte – Using Australian historical maps in your research, by Benjamin Hollister

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 1 December, 11 a.m.:  The Top Ten DNA Do's and Don'ts!, by Michelle Leonard.

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Getting the Most out of the Irish Census, by Natalie Bodie.


*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Finding the Elusive Maiden Name, by Ann Lawthers

5)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts/Radio Shows:

*  The Genealogy Guys:  Podcast 397




6)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube and Facebook):






*  Family History Fanatics:  Ancestry.com: 5 Ways to Enhance Your Family Tree






7)  Did you miss the last post in this series -  Genealogy News and Education Bytes - 26 November 2021?

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Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Carringers in the News -- David J. Carringer Dies After a Three-Story Fall in 1870

 It's time for another edition of "Carringers in the News" - a weekly feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Carringer (my mother's maiden surname) that are interesting, useful, mysterious, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Carson Daily Appeal [Carson city, Nevada] newspaper dated 16 February 1870:

The transcription of this article is:  

"A Somnambulist Killed -- The Auburn Stars and Stripes, of the 10th, has the annexed:

"David J. Carringer, for many months an employee of S.G. Morris, proprietor of the American Hotel in this place, while in a somnambulist state, last Friday evening, stepped out of a third story window of he American and fell forty feet, into the adjoining lot of George Keehner breaking both legs, dislocating his angles and seriously injuring his spine.  The unfortunate man stated, when found, that at the time he fell he supposed he was entering the dining room of the hotel.  Drs. Chapin and Dubois were called in attendance.  On Saturday they amputated one of the legs of the injured man.  He, however, survived the operation but a few hours."

The source citation is:

"A Somnambulist Killed," Carson Daily Appeal [Carson city, Nev.] newspaper, Wednesday, 16 February 1870, page 3, column 3, David J. Carringer article;   GenealogyBank, Newspaper Archives (https://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 29 November 2021).

David J. Carringer was born about 1922 in Mercer County, Pennsylvania, the son of Jacob and Elizabeth (--?--) Carringer.  He died in early February 1870 in or near Auburn, California.  Apparently, he never married.  

David J. Carringer is my 1st cousin four times removed, with common ancestors of my 4th great-grandparents Martin and Magdalena (Hoax) Carringer. He may be the namesake of my 2nd great-grandfather David Jackson Carringer (1828-1902) who was the son of Jacob Carringer's brother, Henry Carringer.

There are hundreds of Carringer "stories" in my family tree - and this was one of them. Life happens, accidentally and intentionally, and sometimes a newspaper article tells us of a fatal incident in the life of a relative.  I am glad that I can honor David J. Carringer today.

You never know when a descendant or relative will find this blog post and learn something about their ancestors or relatives, or will provide more information about them to me.

                                  =============================================

Disclosure: I have a complimentary subscription to Newspapers.com and have used it extensively to find articles about my ancestral and one-name families.


Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook,  or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Family Tree Maker 2019 Upgrade Sale - Only $29.95

 Jack Minsky of Family Tree Maker sent me this information:

=============================================

WELCOME TO THE FASTEST, SMARTEST NEW EDITION

It's been thirty years since Family Tree Maker was born and it's only fitting that we introduced a new edition that takes this grand old brand to places its original creators could only have dreamed of. Where changes you make to your tree on your Mac or PC are automatically backed up to a secure cloud vault every fifteen seconds. Where your tree can be instantly fact-checked by a relative half way around the world on their smartphone or tablet. Where you can turn back time to erase mistakes you made even a thousand changes ago. Where you can arrange for your tree to be passed on to a successor of your choice along with your Family Tree Maker license to ensure your legacy lives on.

That's just a small part of the new world of Family Tree Maker. And you can get in on the fun by upgrading to FTM 2019 today and save up to 70%.

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TOP TEN REASONS TO UPGRADE

Here are some of the best reasons to upgrade if you have the previous version, FTM 2017. If your version is even older, there are even more features in store for you – click here to learn more.

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                                         =========================================

Disclosure:  I have been a customer of Family Tree Maker since 1995.  I have received several complimentary copies of the software from Software MacKiev in the past five years.  I have not received a complimentary upgrade to FTM 2019.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Monday, November 29, 2021

Genealogy Pot-Pourri - Week Ending 29 November 2021

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week.

1) Hosted and moderated the Chula Vista Genealogical Society General Meeting on Wednesday on Zoom with 61 in attendance.  J. Mark Lowe presented Researching Colonial Virginia and Kentucky from Home."  It was an excellent presentation.  We elected society officers for 2022 after the program.

2) Participated in today's Mondays With Myrt Zoom webinar. We discussed the Zoom update, Census Genie, and "What essential things should you pack for a move?"  I listed computer, heirlooms, wall and album photos, certificate notebook, family papers, books, and financial records.  I had to leave at 9:30 a.m., so don't know what happened after that.


5) AncestryDNA added 31 new DNA matches this past week, with no new ThruLines, and MyHeritage added 10 new DNA matches. Reviewed the new DNA matches on AncestryDNA, MyHeritageDNA, FamilyTreeDNA and 23andMe. 

6)  There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 46,075 of my RootsMagic persons with FamilySearch Family Tree profiles (up 60).

7) Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and source citations to my RootsMagic profiles. I now have 67,436 persons in my RootsMagic file (up 49 from last week), and 143,493 source citations (up 72). I TreeShared 139 new or modified profiles with my Ancestry Member Tree, and I resolved 593 Ancestry Hints. My new Ancestry Member Tree has Ancestry Record Hints with 22,584 to be resolved, but I work on them almost daily. 

8) Wrote 16 Genea-Musings blog posts the past week, of which one was a press release. The most viewed post the past week was 
Carringers in the News -- District Attorney Marion Carringer Shot in 1915 in Forest County, Pennsylvania.   with over 370 views.

9) I am still fine here at the Genea-cave, hunkered down and not going out much after Week 89 of COVID-19 isolation. Linda is at a memory care and skilled nursing facility in Chula Vista 7 miles from home and I visit her for an hour every day - we play Uno and she wins about half the time.  Daughter Lori came to visit us on Monday and left on Friday - she decorated Linda's room for Christmas, and made dinner for me (with leftovers). The Aztecs won and the Chargers lost their games.  I was sick with lightheadedness and nausea on Saturday, but better on Sunday, but still really tired.  I went to the grocery store on Monday and Friday. Other than that, it was stay-at-home on the computer doing (mainly) genealogy, plus eating, sleeping, laundry, cleaning, cooking, watching TV news and sports, reading books, napping, and a little yard work.

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The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2021/11/genealogy-pot-pourri-week-ending-29.html
 
Copyright (c) 2021, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post. Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below. Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.