Tuesday, June 30, 2015

Tuesday's Tip - Use the Improved BLM General Land Office Website to Find Federal Land Patent Locations

This week's Tuesday's Tip is:  Use the improved and revamped Bureau of Land Management's (BLM) General Land Office (GLO) website to find Federal land patents and survey maps of your ancestors land grants.

The Bureau of Land Management website for the General Land Office records is  http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/default.aspx.


The page provides information about Land Patents, Survey Plats and Field Notes, and Land Status Records.  The description says:

"Welcome to the Bureau of Land Management(BLM), General Land Office (GLO) Records Automation web site. We provide live access to Federal land conveyance records for the Public Land States, including image access to more than five million Federal land title records issued between 1820 and the present. We also have images related to survey plats and field notes, dating back to 1810. Due to organization of documents in the GLO collection, this site does not currently contain every Federal title record issued for the Public Land States."

If you click on the "Search Documents" tab near the top of the page, the "Search" page (http://www.glorecords.blm.gov/search/default.aspx) provides a number of search fields on the "Search Documents by Type" tab.


The user has to select a Location (State required, County optional) and either Names or Land Description or Miscellaneous.

On the screen above, I selected "Kansas" in the "Location" field and entered Last Name = "smith" and First Name = "devier" in the "Names" field.

I clicked on the orange "Search Patents" button and saw:

 It appears that Devier J. Smith had two land patents in Cheyenne County, Kansas.  They were both in Township 3 South Range 40 West, in Sections 11 and 10.

I clicked on the link for the first one on the list and saw the "Patent Details" tab information:


The table information included the names on the document, miscellaneous information about the patent, document numbers, survey information (160 acres) and the Land Description.  The "Land Description" provides the aliquot parts of the land obtained - in this case there are two different parts - the W1/2SW1/4 (West half of the Southwest quarter) of Section 11, and the W/1/2NW1/4 (West half of the Northwest quarter) of Section 11.

Further down the page is a map.  If you click on the check box under "Map" in the "Land Description" section (circled in red on the screen above), then the GLO page will zoom in and show the Township and Section, and in some case, the aliquot parts.  Here is the map for this specific patent:


When I checked the boxes, this message appeared:  "Due to data limitations, we could not map the aliquots or lots of this land description. The township and section are shown."

The user can zoom in using the Zoom Bar on the left to see more detail with geophysical features shown under the township and section squares:


I didn't see a way to save the map other than to take a screen shot or use the Snipping Tool and save the image.

Back on the "Search documents" screen, the "Patent Image" tab provides an image of the Patent granted to the person for the land:


The user can order the Patent for a price, or can print (using the print icon) or download a PDF (using the download icon) of the Patent.

The "Related documents" tab on the "Search Documents" page provides a list of the other patentees in the Section:



The user can click on each of those to find the land description and land patents for those persons too.

I clicked on the "Surveys," "LSR," and "CDI" links in the left-hand column and there was no information for this specific section.

I have written before about finding land location using the GLO patent information, the Earthpoint.us website and Google Earth in Finding Henry Carringer's Land Patents, and Location, in Cheyenne County, Kansas (posted 24 July 2013).

Judy G. Russell wrote Thank You BLM! two weeks ago highlighting her experience with the BLM GLO website but she entered a specific land description (state, township, range, section, aliquot parts) to find her ancestor's land.

The addition of the Map function to the BLM GLO website is a significant addition that makes it easier to determine where the land was located relative to present-day geophysical features.  The Google Earth method is still "cool" and useful.  

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Monday, June 29, 2015

It's Always the Last Place You Look!

Of course it is...but sometimes you have to look a long time.

The challenge today was to find the death notice of my second great-grandmother, Abbie A. (Vaux) Smith (1844-1931), who died 11 September 1931 in San Diego.  I recalled seeing a newspaper clipping about twenty years ago and wanted to find a digitized version of it.

Since GenealogyBank has the San Diego newspapers, so this should be a piece of cake, right?  Just do a search in 1931 for Abbie Smith (or maybe Abigail, or Abbey) with San Diego as keywords to limit the search.  Nope, no luck.

I took out the given name Abbie and added the surname Carringer to the Keyword section, and had no success.

I took out the San Diego, as shown below:


There were only 23 matches.


Number 10 on the list above looks like the prize:


Yep, there she is!  It doesn't say too much:

"SMITH -- Sept. 11, 1931.  Abbie A. Smith,
mother of Mrs. Della A. Carringer and 
grandmother of Lyle L. Carringer and
Mrs. Eva De France and Mrs. Maybelle
Milner, all of this city; a native of
New York; age 86 years; Friends are
invited to attend services at Benbough's
Funeral Parlors, 7th and Date sts.; Sat-
urday at 4 p.m. Cremation, Benbough's
crematory.  Please omit flowers."

A source citation (using the RootsMagic source template for "Newspaper, Online Images":

"OBITUARY," [San Diego] Evening Tribune, 12 September 1931, page 18, column 1, Abbie A. Smith death notice; digital image, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com : accessed 29 June 2015), Newspaper Archives.

Why couldn't I find this item with the first name?  Well, the print was so run together that the OCR read the name as Abble rather than Abbie.  A search using Abb* as the first name also provides the article.

I still haven't found Abbie's urnsite.  Since she was cremated, she may be at Cypress View Mausoleum in San Diego, which is where my great-grandparents and grandparents are inurned.  I need to look for Abbie's son, David D. Smith there also.

This should be very helpful for some researchers with New England ancestry.  
The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

NEHGS Salutes the Nation’s Anniversary with FREE Access to the Great Migration Databases on AmericanAncestors.org

From my email today:

======================================



Family Historians May Commemorate Independence Day by Searching FREE on AmericanAncestors.org for America’s Earliest Settlers, July 1 through July 8

June 29, 2015—Boston, Massachusetts—In a salute to the anniversary of our nation’s independence, New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) is granting FREE access to all online searchable databases related to the Great Migration. A unique foundation of governance and religion was created by the 20,000 men, women, and  children who crossed the Atlantic between 1620 and 1640, seeking opportunity and relief in New England, in the period known as the Great Migration. These are the Mayflower names, the Pilgrims, the Puritans, and the families that delight and provide rich insights for genealogists and family historians.  Since 1988 NEHGS has  undertaken the Great Migration Study Project, directed by Robert Charles Anderson and scheduled for completion in 2016. The results are open to the public to research FREE during the first week of July 2015 on its data-rich website AmericanAncestors.org.
A total of nine searchable databases comprise the Great Migration project on AmericanAncestors.org, consisting of thousands of records.  Some content highlights include:
1: The Great Migration Begins
The first phase of the Great Migration Study Project attempts to identify and describe all those Europeans who settled in New England prior to the end of 1633. The date was chosen because of the steep increase in migration beginning in 1634 and continuing for the rest of that decade (see Robert Charles Anderson, "A Note on the Pace of the Great Migration," The New England Quarterly 59 [1986]:406-07). As a rough estimate, about 15 percent of the immigrants to New England arrived in the fourteen years from 1620 to 1633, with the remaining 85 percent coming over in half as many years, from 1634 to 1640.
2: The Great Migration Newsletter
This database comprises Volumes 1 through 20 of the Great Migration Newsletter, published between 1990 and 2011. Each 32-page issue contains one or two feature articles, a column with editor's comments, and a review of recent literature on the Great Migration. Each issue also contains a section with detailed coverage of one of the towns settled during the Great Migration, or of a specific critical record, or group of records.
3: The Great Migration:  Immigrants to New England, 1634-1635, Volumes I—VII, A-Y(7 separate databases)
From 1620 to 1633, only a few hundred people stepped on the shores of New England in any given year. But all of a sudden in 1634 the trend surged upward and as many as 2,500 people immigrated in 1634 and again in 1635. In May 1634, the population of Massachusetts doubled in just one month, and when comparing immigration in 1634 and 1635 to immigration in 1633 and earlier, there was a tenfold jump in annual immigration.
These volumes covering surnames beginning with A through Y, complete a series documenting the watershed years of 1634 and 1635. They trace families and individuals immigrating to New England during those two years – a time of rapid migration and settlement.
Each alphabetical entry for a family or individual includes:
• Place of origin, if known
• Date and ship on which they arrived in New England, if known
• Earliest known record of the individual or family
• First residence and subsequent residences, when known
• Return trips to their country of origin, whether temporary or permanent
• Bibliographical information such as birth, death, marriage(s), children, and other important family relationships, church memberships, and civil and military offices held
The full introduction to these seven volumes is available for download as a pdf file. The introduction includes a description of the methodology used to create the sketches as well as thorough descriptions of the sources used.
The database provides an index to the sketches of 219 Great Migration individuals, and the 7,192 name, 2,040 place, and 249 ship name references contained within those sketches. The images of the original book pages are available from the search results pages.
These Great Migration databases from NEHGS will be open with FREE access to the public beginning Wednesday, July 1, through Wednesday, July 8. Registration at AmericanAncestors.org is required as a FREE Guest Member to gain access to these valuable resources. Guest User accounts allow web visitors to use a limited suite of AmericanAncestors.org databases and access web content such as making purchases from the online store. Unlimited access to all 450+ million records and other benefits is through membership at NEHGS.
Family historians may start their search for ancestors who came to the country as part of the Great Migration at this site: AmericanAncestors.org/specials/fourth-of-july
====================================
This should be very helpful for some researchers with New England ancestry.  
The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.



New or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - June 21 to 27, 2015

I'm trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list).  

As of 27 June 2015, there were 2,015 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 1 from last week):



The new or updated collections are:

*  United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014; 15,860,585 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 27 Jun 2015

*  New York, State Census, 1865; 2,623,218 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Tennessee, County Marriages, 1790-1950; 4,590,990 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  North Carolina, Probate Records, 1735-1970; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1627-2001; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Nova Scotia Deaths, 1864-1877; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Nova Scotia Marriages, 1864-1918; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Nova Scotia Births, 1864-1877; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 26 Jun 2015

*  Illinois, County Marriages, 1810-1934; 1,530,387 indexed records, with no record images, added or updated 25 Jun 2015

*  Delaware Vital Records, 1680-1971; 624,395 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 25 Jun 2015

*  BillionGraves Index; 14,112,502 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 24 Jun 2015

*  Vermont, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1732-2005; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 24 Jun 2015

*  Italy, Toscana, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1804-1874; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 24 Jun 2015

*  Ireland, Petty Sessions Court Registers, 1828-1912; 21,833,785 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 24 Jun 2015

*  Peru, Callao, Civil Registration, 1874-1996; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 23 Jun 2015

*  Brazil, Pernambuco, Civil Registration, 1804-2014; 6,762 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 23 Jun 2015


*  Brazil, São Paulo, Immigration Cards, 1902-1980; 2,658,219 indexed records, with record images, added or updated 22 Jun 2015

Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell which collections are brand new and which ones are updated.  The asterisk they use is for "Recently added or updated."  I am particularly interested in new collections, for the obvious reasons.

In order to select a specific collection, go to 
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner.

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Amanuensis Monday - Post 274: Will of John Bigelow (1617-1703) of Watertown, Mass.

Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The subject today is the 1703 will of John Biglo (1617-1703) of Watertown, Massachusetts:


The transcription of the will is:


In the name of God amen.
I John Biglo of Watertown in the county of Midd'x within her Majesties Province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England, yeom, being weeke of 
body but in sound & disposing Memory prais be given to god for the same, Doo make this my last will & testament in manner & forme following: 
that is to say first & principally I Resign my soul into the mercyfull hands of almighty god my Creator, assuredly hoping through the 
merits of my blessed Saviour to obtaine pardon & remission of all my sins; and my body I comit to the earth whence it was taken,
 to be decently buried by the descretion of my executors hereinafter named, and as for the worldly goods & estate the lord hath lone 
me I dispose thereof as follows.

Imps.   I give and bequeath unto Sarah my well beloved wife, and to her heires & assigns for ever, all the lands and movable estat that 
was hers before our Marriage, and forty pounds in money, twenty pounds of sd money to be pd her within one month after my deces, 
and twenty within one year after my Deces.  also for her personl supply after my Deces I give unto her forty pounds waight 
of good porke, three bushils of barly, and one bushil of Indian corn, five pound waight in butter and five pounds waight in
 Chees, and also two Sheep, and halfe the flax that shall be in the house at my Deces, and that to be in full satisfaction of her thirds.

2ly I give & bequeath to my eldest son John Biglo, & to his heires & assigns forever, twenty pounds in money to be pd within one 
year after my Deces, and in case my sd son have an heire lawfully begotten of his own body, I give & bequeath unto his 
sd heire twenty pounds in money to be pd to him, or her, when it shall shall be of twenty one years of age, or day of 
marriage which shall first hapon, but if it hapon my sd son deces without an heir as abovesd, then my will is yt 
ye abovesd twenty pounds be equally divided between my children then surviving.

3ly I give & bequeath to my son Jonathan Biglo, and to his heires & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money 
to be pd him wthin one year after my Deces.

4ly I give & bequeath to my son Daniell Biglo, and to his heires & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money to be pd 
him wthin one year after my Deces.

5ly I give & bequeath to my son Samuell Biglo, and to his heires & assigns ten pounds in money besides what he hath already had, to 
be pd to him within one year after my Deces.

6ly I give and bequeath unto my son Joshua Biglo, and to his heires & assigns forever, two parcels of land, lying on ye westerly side of 
bow brook in sd town, Purchased of Lieut Tho. Hammond, as may more fully appear by the deeds of the same, and twenty five 
pounds in money, to be pd him within one year after my Deces.

7ly I give and bequeath unto my son James Biglo, fifteen pounds which I lent him as may appear by a bond under his hand & seale,
 and I give & bequeath to my said son James' son James Biglo, ten pounds in money to be pd him if he shall live to the age of 
twenty one years, but if it so happen that he deces before ye sd age, then ye sd ten pounds to be equally divided between 
my sd son James surviving children, when they shall be of the age of twenty one years or day of marriage which shall first 
hapon.

8ly I give & bequeath to my daughter Mary Flagg & to her heires & assigns forever, twenty five pounds in money to be pd her 
within two years after my deces.

9ly I give & bequeath to my daughter Elizabeth Sterne's Children twenty five pounds in money, to be pd them when they are 
twenty one years of age, or day of marriage which shall first hapon.

10ly. I give & bequeath to my daughter Sarah Larnard and to her heires & assigns forever twenty five pounds in money, 
within three years after my Deces.

11ly, I give & bequeath to my daughter Martha Wood's children lawfully begotten of her own body twenty five 
pounds in money to be pd them equally alike, when they shall arrive to the age of twenty one years or day of marriage, 
which shall first hapon.

12ly. I give & bequeath unto my daughter Abigail Herrington & to her heires & assigns, twenty five pounds in money to 
be pd within fower years after my Deces.  And I doe nominate, ordaine & appoint, my abovesd son Joshua Biglo, and 
my son-in-law Isaac Larnard my Sole Executors to se this my last will & testament performed, and all 
the rest & Residue of my estate not herein bequeathed, after all my just debts and funerall charges 
are pd, my will is that it be divided between my sd executors, that is to say, two parts of three, to my sd son 
Joshua, and one third to my son in law Isaac Larnard, and I do request my trusty and well beloved fr'nd, 
Capt. Benj. Garfield to be my overseer of this my last will & testament, my sd executors to allow him
out of my estat for his cost & charges resonable sattisfaction to his content. Revocking & making null
and voide all former or other wills by me hertofore made.  In witness hereof I have hereunto set my 
hand & seal this fourth Day of January one thousand seven hundred two, three, and in the first year of
 the Reign of our lady Anne, by the grace of God over England &c Queen.
                                                                                                 his
                                                                                           John x Biglo
                                                                                                mark
"Signed, sealed & Published
In the Presence of us
Samll Livermore
Daniel Herington    Witnesses
Munings Sawin

The other papers in the probate estate packet include:

The inventory of "John Biglow" was taken 16 July 1703 by Jonas Bond, Munnings Sawin and Ebenezer Grout.  The estate was apprized at 205 pounds in real estate, 362 pounds, 12 shillings in money and bills, and 60 pounds in personal estate.  The real estate included the mansion house with barn and orchard, totaling about 13 acres; twenty acres of Dividend land; about six acres of land and meadow on the east end of beaver brook; and about five acres of meadow at four mile brook. Among the expenses charged for the funeral were several pairs of black gloves, twenty gallons of wine, bottles for the same, allspice and sugar, and two men and horses to carry the wine and other articles.

The Account of the executors was submitted 30 October 1703.  The funeral expenses included black gloves, white gloves, mourning hats for 11 persons, two new bottles to bring up wine, allspice, sugar, the coffin, the cloak, digging the grave, two men and two horses for carrying wine and other things to the funeral, a man and horse going to Sherborn to notify Isaac Learned and his wife, and to Billerica to notify John Stearns.  The legacies provided in the will were paid, as were the costs of probate.  264 pounds, 2 shillings and 11 pence was left in the hands of the executors, which they probably divided as specified in the will.

The probate packet contains receipts for the legacies given to John Biglow, Jonathan Biglow, Daniel Begalo, Benjamin Herington, John Stearns, Samuel Beglo and Mikel Fleg, all witnessed by two other men.

The source citation for the will of John Biglo is:

"Middlesex County, MA: Probate Papers, 1648-1871," Estate packet 1716, John Biglo estate, 1703, will on sheet 2 of 7, digital images, New England Historic Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (http://www.AmericanAncestors.org : accessed 28 June 2015) 

John Biglo/Bigelow is my 10th great-grandfather, and I am descended from him and his first wife Mary Warren (1624-1691) through his son Samuel Biglo/Bigelow (1653-1732) and his wife Mary Flagg (1658-1720).

I first obtained a photocopy of this probate packet from FHL microfilm 0,386,028 many years ago and transcribed it then.  

The URL for this post is:   http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/06/amanuensis-monday-post-274-will-of-john.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Sunday, June 28, 2015

Added or Updated Databases at Ancestry.com - Week of June 20 to 26, 2015

The following databases were added or updated on Ancestry.com during the period from 20 to 26 June 2015:



The databases added or updated include:

*  Web, Minnesota Birth Index, 1900-1934, indexed records, no images, UPDATED 25 June 2015.

The recently added and updated page on Ancestry.com is at http://www.ancestry.com/cs/recent-collections

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at  http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx. 
 

There were 0 NEW databases this past week. There are 32,695 databases available as of 27 June.

The URL for this post is:  
http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/06/added-or-updated-databases-at_4.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Best of the Genea-Blogs - 21 to 27 June 2015

Hundreds of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.


My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.

Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


*  "Where Do I Come From?" by guest writer Mark on Roberta Estes' DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy blog.  Mark's story is about his search for his birth mother using DNA results and matches.

*  Genealogy Society Woes by Ruby Coleman on the Genealogy Lines blog.  Ruby comments on the problems facing some genealogical societies, and her remedies.

*  It All began 20 Years Ago ... by Cyndi Ingle on the Cyndi's List blog.  Cyndi tells all...about her website history.

*  The Scourge of Phthsis (Tuberculosis) by Wayne Shepheard on the Discover Genealogy blog.  Wayne discusses the impact this disease has had on his ancestral research and the world.

*  Have That Difficult Conversation by Janine Adams on the Peace of Mind Organizing blog.  Janine just lost her mother, and is thankful they planned ahead.

*  20 Reasons You Should Blog Your Family History Book by Lynn Palermo on The Family History Writing Studio blog.  Lynn's list makes good sense.

*  FAMILY HISTORY LIBRARY -- After you Return Home ... Then What? by Diane Gould Hall on the Michigan Family Trails blog.  Diane demonstrates how she works with creating and cataloging camera images from her visit to Salt Lake City.

*  Crowd Control and Genealogy -- What Would You Do? by Jacquie Schattner on the Seeds to Tree blog.  Jacquie's post concerns audience requests for speaker presentation materials.

*  Confused by Your AncestryDNA Matches? Read This Post by Diahan Southard on Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems blog.  A closer look at New Ancestry Discoveries (NADs) but I'm still confused.

*  Searching Your Mexican Roots: Pre-1930 Records by Laura Martinez on The In-Depth Genealogist blog.  Laura provides an excellent summary of the availability and history of Mexican genealogical resources.

*  The Kings and I by Roberta J. Estes on the DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy blog.  I want one of these!

*  When A Tenant Isn't by Judy G. Russell on The Legal Genealogist blog.  Judy works through the word curtesy.  Interesting.

*  The Elements of Research -- Part Twenty Five: The Not-So-Final Conclusion by James Tanner on the Genealogy's Star blog.  James has an excellent set of 25 articles about the genealogical research process, is this the last one?

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Recommended Reads by Linda Stufflebean on the Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog.

*  Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for June 26, 2015 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

*  Friday Finds - 06/26/15 by Julie Cahill Tarr on Julie's Genealogy and History Hub blog.

*  Friday Genealogy Finds - June 20th -26th by Nichelle Barra on the Copper Leaf Genealogy blog.

*  This Week's Creme de la Creme -- June 27, 2015 by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

* Noteworthy Reads #19 by Jo Henn on the Climbing My Family Tree blog.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.

Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I am currently reading posts from over 1580 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


The URL for this post is:  
http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/06/best-of-genea-blogs-21-to-27-june-2015.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Saturday, June 27, 2015

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Own Scavenger Hunt

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 

 It's Saturday Night again - 
time for some more Genealogy Fun!!



Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music, please!):

1) You're going on a scavenger hunt - for records of one of your relatives.  You can pick a relative who lived in the 1800 to 2000 time period.  A brother of one of your ancestors might be best (since males don't change their name).  Or the husband of a sister of your ancestor.  
Tell us the name of your chosen relative. 

2)   Go to FamilySearch and search for records for that relative.  Start on the Search page - https://www.familysearch.org/search.  Search any way you want.   

3)  Tell us what you found in the FamilySearch record collections.  Did you find something new about that relative?   What else can you find online at another website?

4)  Write your own blog post, comment on this post, or write something on Facebook or Google Plus.

Here's mine:

1)  I chose William A. Carringer (1816-1900), son of Jacob and Elizabeth (--?--) Carringer, born in Mercer County, Pennsylcvania, died San Diego, California.  He married Irene Churchill in 1838 in New York.


2)  The records I found on FamilySearch for William Carringer (1816-1900) included:

*  1840 U.S. Census, Sandy Creek, Mercer County, Pennsylvania
*  1850 U.S. Census, Whitewater, Walworth County, Wisconsin, with Irina Caringer, Philanda E. Caringer, Almira Caringer and Olive Caringer
*  1860 U.S. Census, Chester, Adams county, Wisconsin, with Irina Carringer, Louise A. Carringer, Olive A. Carringer, and Philena Patrick.
*  1870 U.S. Census, Kalmar, Olmsted County, Minnesota, with Irene Carringer and Mattie Staples.
*  1880 U.S. Census, Kalmar, Olmsted County, Minnesota, with wife Irene.
*  1895 Minnesota State Census, Frankford, Mower County, Minnesota, Wm Carringer with Irene Carringer.

Ancestry.com had the following additional records:

*  1875 Minnesota State Census, Kalmar, Olmsted County, Minnesota, for William Carringer
*  1885 Minnesota State Census, Kalmar, Olmsted County, Minnesota for W. Carringer
*  Find A Grave Index, Evergreen Cemetery, Riverside, Riverside County, California, gravestone photo, birth and death dates.

3)  The Minnesota State Census records were new finds for me.  All of these records were used to add source citations to my database.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/06/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-your-own.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Surname Saturday -- MOORECOCK (England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am in the 8th great-grandmothers and I'm up to Ancestor #1129 who is  Mary MOORECOCK (1625-1694) 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 8th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts].

My ancestral line back through two generations of this MOORECOCK family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

34. Alpheus B. Smith (1802-1840)
35. Elizabeth Horton Dill (1791-1869)


70.  Thomas Dill (1758-1836)
71.  Hannah Horton (1761-1797)

140.  Thomas Dill (1708-1761)
141.  Mehitable Brown (1714-1758)

282.  Samuel Brown (1686-1739)
283.  Ruth Young (1688-1768)

564.  George Brown (1658-1721)
565.  Mehitable Knowles (1653-1721)

1128.  William Brown, born about 1624 in England; died 07 April 1694 in Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States.  He married 16 July 1649 in Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States.
1129.  Mary Moorecock, born about 1625 in Kent, England; died after 1694 in probably Eastham, Barnstable, Massachusetts, United States.  

Children of William Brown and Mary Moorecock are:
*  Mary Brown (1650-????).
*  George Brown (1652-1721), married 1674 Mehitable Knowles (1653-1721)
*  William Brown (1654-????).
*  Samuel Brown (1656-1691), married 1682 Martha Harding (1662-1692).
*  Mercy Brown (1658-????).
*  John Brown (1662-1719), married (1) 1689 Sarah ????; (2) 1696 Isabel Mathewson (????-1719).
*  James Brown (1662-1732), married 1691 (Mary Harris (1671-1736).

2258.  Henry Moorecock, born in Smarden, Kent, England; died before 1625 in Kent, England.  He married 04 June 1616 in St. Margaret's, Canterbury, Kent, England.
2259.  Audria Cork, born about 1590 in Egerton, Kent, England; died before December 1638 in Plymouth, Plymouth, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of Henry Moorecock and Audria Cork are:
*  Bennet Moorecock (1619-????).
*  Nicholas Moorecock (1621-????)
*  Mary Moorecock (1625-1694), married 1649 William Brown (1624-1694).

Information about this Moorecock family was obtained from:

Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration:  Immigrants to New England 1634-1635 (Boston, Mass. : NEHGS, 1999-2011), Volume V, pages 147-148, Mary Morecock sketch.

The URL for this post is: http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/06/surname-saturday-moorecock-england-to.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.