Friday, January 30, 2015

NEW or Updated Databases on Ancestry.com - Week of 24-30 January 2015

The following databases were added or updated on Ancestry.com during the period from 24 to 30 January 2015 (Note: not all new or updated databases are indexed or have images).

*  Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, Welsh Society of Philadelphia Charity to Immigrants, 1798-1883; indexed database with images, ADDED 1/29/2015

*  Web: Iceland Census, 1890; indexed database, no images, ADDED 1/29/2015

*  Web: Iceland Census, 1880; indexed database, no images,  ADDED 1/29/2015

*  Web: Iceland Census, 1870; indexed database, no images, ADDED 1/29/2015

*  U.S., Northern Pacific Railway Company Personnel Files, 1890-1960;  indexed database, with images, Updated 1/28/2015

*  Georgia, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1904-1964;  indexed database, with images, Updated 1/27/2015

*  Oregon, Passenger and Crew Lists, 1888-1963;  indexed database, with images, Updated 1/27/2015

*  Upper Austria, Austria, Catholic Church Records, 1772-1853 (in German);  indexed database, no images, Updated 1/27/2015

*  Alabama, Passenger Lists, 1904-1962;  indexed database, no images, ADDED 1/26/2015

*  Indiana, Passenger and Crew Manifests, 1957-1960;  indexed database, with images, ADDED 1/26/2015

*  Colorado, Passenger and Crew Manifests, 1959-1960; indexed database, with images, ADDED 1/26/2015

*  Registers of Patients at Naval Hospitals, 1812 - 1934;  indexed database, with images, ADDED 1/26/2015

*  Spain, Diocese of Lugo, Catholic Parish Records, 1550-1930 (in Spanish);  indexed database, with images, Updated 1/26/2015


*  North Carolina, Divorce Index, 1958-2004;  indexed database, with images, Updated 1/26/2015

The recently added or updated page on Ancestry.com is  at  http://www.ancestry.com/cs/reccol/default.

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at  http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  There are 32,565 databases available as of 30 January, an increase of 9 over last week. 

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 57: #64, Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816)

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I am extending this theme in 2015 to 104 Ancestors in 104 Weeks. Here is my ancestor biography for week #57:


Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816)  is #64 on my Ahnentafel list, my 4th great-grandfather. He married in 1783  to #65 Martha Whitney (1764-1832) .



I am descended through:

*  their son, #32 Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825),
who married  #33 Abigail Gates (1797-1867) in 1817.
*  their son, #16 Isaac Seaver (1823-1901), who married #17 Lucretia Townsend Smith (1828-1884) in 1852.
*  their son, #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922), who married #9 Hattie Louise Hildreth (1847-1920) in 1874. 
*  their son, #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942), who married Alma Bessie richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
* their son, #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983), who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son, #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

 =====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                               Benjamin Seaver [1–12]    
*  Alternate Name:               Benjamin Sever [8,14–15,19–22,24–25]
*  Sex:                                  Male   

*  Father:                              Captain Norman Seaver (1734-1787)   
*  Mother:                             Sarah Read (1736-1809)   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Birth:                                21 April 1757, Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[13–14]   
*  Christened:                      24 April 1757 (age 0), Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States
*  Military Service:             13 May 1775 (age 18), enlisted in Col. Asa Whitcomb's 23rd Regiment; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[15]    
*  Miscellaneous:                1787–1810 (about age 30–about 53), Children born to Benjamin and Martha Seaver; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[16]   
*  Census:                           1 June 1790 (age 33), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[1]
*  Estate Distribution:         3 January 1792 (age 34), distribution of father's estate; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[17]
*  Deed:                              13 December 1793 (age 36), bought 1 acre in Westminster from Asa Taylor; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[18]   
*  Deed:                              1 January 1794 (age 36), bought 40 acres of land in Westminster (part of the 3rd division lot 67), from David Barnard; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[19]   
*  Deed:                             16 January 1795 (age 37), bought 12 and a half acres in Westminster from Zachariah Rand; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[8]   
*  Deed:                             5 January 1796 (age 38), sold 1/4 acre of land in the northerly part of Westminster to Zebina Spaulding; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[2]   
*  Tax List:                        1798 (about age 41), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[20]
*  Deed:                            4 March 1800 (age 42), bought 60 acres of upland in the northerly part of Westminster, being half of the farm, from Ephraim Wetherbee for $77.50; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[3]   
*  Census:                         1 June 1800 (age 43), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[21]
*  Deed:                           14 April 1801 (age 43), agreement to buy 62 acres in the northerly part of Westminster from Ephraim Wetherbee; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[4]   
*  Deed:                           11 January 1802 (age 44), bought 34 acres, being part of lots 41 and 42 in Westminster, from Farwell Jones for $700; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[5]
*  Deed:                           3 March 1806 (age 48), Bought part of lots 41 and 42 in Westminster from Jarvis Pierce; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[6]    
*  Census :                       1 June 1810 (age 53), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[7]
*  Deed:                          28 November 1811 (age 54), bought one and a half acres in the Beech Hill part of Westminster from Josiah Kendall; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[8]    
*  Deed:                          3 December 1814 (age 57), bought 49 acres of land in Hubbardston, part of the great farm number 7, from Luke Church; Hubbardston, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[9]   
*  Deed:                          22 January 1815 (age 57), sold 26 acres and 56 rods of the lot in Hubbardston to Sewell Barnes; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[22]
*  Death:                        24 June 1816 (age 59), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[10]
*  Burial:                        after 24 June 1816 (after age 59), Woodside Cemetery, Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[11,23]
*  Estate Administration: 16 July 1816 (age 59), Letter of administration to Martha Seaver; Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[12]    
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Spouse 1:                    Martha Whitney (1764-1832)   
*  Marriage:                    19 August 1783 (age 26), Leominster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[25-27]

*  Child 1:                       Achsah Whitney Seaver (1784-1865)   
*  Child 2:                       Abigail Seaver (1786-1817)   
*  Child 3:                       Job Whitney Seaver (1789-1868)   
*  Child 4:                       Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)   
*  Child 5:                       Susannah Whitney Seaver (1794-1879)   
*  Child 6:                       Martha Seaver (1797-1837)   
*  Child 7:                       Silas Whitney Seaver (1799-    )   
*  Child 8:                       Isaac Seaver (1802-1870)   
*  Child 9:                       Rozilla Seaver (1806-1825)   
*  Child 10:                     Mary Jane Seaver (1812-1892)   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

The birth record for Benjamin Sever in the Sudbury, Massachusetts town records says[13,14]:

"Benjamin Sever son of Norman Sever & Sarah his wife was born April 21st 1757"

Benjamin Seaver served in the Revolutionary War[15].  He was a private in Captain Edmund Bemis's company in Colonel Asa Whitcomb's 23rd Regiment, enlisting May 13, 1775, and was on the muster roll dated August 1, 1775 (service 2 months, 24 days).  He was a Corporal on a company receipt for wages for August 1775, dated Camp at Prospect Hill.  He was a Private on the company return (probably October 1775), and on a receipt for a bounty coat dated Westminster, November 20, 1775.

In a separate listing, Benjamin Sever of Sudbury was on the list of men raised agreeable for six months service to the resolve of June 5, 1780, returned as received of Major Joseph Hosmer, Superintendent for Middlesex County by Justin Ely, Commissioner, dated 8 July 1780 in Springfield by Brigadier General John Glover.  He is described as age 23 years, stature 6 feet, light complexion.  He was engaged for the town of Sudbury and marched to camp on 8 July 1780 under command of Ebenezer Kent, Esquire.  He was also a Private in Captain Joseph Fox's Third company, 16th Massachusetts Regiment.  He was on the pay roll for June and July, 1780 for 24 days of service. He was also on the list of men raised for the six months service and returned by Brigadier General Paterson as having passed muster in a return dated Camp Totoway on October 25, 1780.

The marriage record in the Westminster town records says[27]:

August 19              This day Benjamin Sever                  both of
1783                       and Martha Whitney                      Westminster

He settled on his father's homestead in Westminster in 1787, having been granted two-thirds of the real property and a double portion of personal property (as the eldest son)  in his father's estate in 1792[17].

The list of children born to Benjamin and Martha Seaver in Westminster, Mass. is[16]:

Benjamin Seaver and Marthy his Wife Family Records
December 30th 1784          Achsa Whitney Seaver Born
December 2d 1786             Abigail Seaver Born
May 1^t 1789                     Job Seaver Born
November 15th 1791         Benjamin Seaver Born
July 27th 1794                   Susanna ^Whitney Seaver Born
Febr^y ye 10th 1797          Martha Seaver Born
Nov^r 24^th 1799              Silas Whitney Seaver Born
Dec^r 20^th 1802               Isaac Seaver Born
March 16^th 1806              Rozilla Seaver Born & Died Sept 18 1825
April 14^th 1812                Mary Jane Seaver Born

The Benjamin Seaver family was enumerated in Westminster in the 1790 U.S. census with[1]:

*  1 free white male of 16 years and upwards
*  1 free white male under 16 years
*  3 free white females

He bought 1 acre in Westminster from Asa Taylor for 3 pounds on 13 December 1793[18].

Benjamin Sever, yeoman of Westminster, bought 40 acres of land in Westminster (part of the 3rd division lot 67), from David Barnard, gentleman of Acton, on 1 January 1794 for 66 pounds[19].

He bought 12 and a half acres in Westminster from Zachariah Rand of Westminster on 16 January 1795 for 50 pounds[8].

Bernjamin Seaver, yeoman of Westminster, sold 1/4 acre of land in the northerly part of Westminster to Zebina Spaulding, cordwainer of Westminster, for $5 on 5 January 1796[2].

In the 1798 Direct Tax list for Massachusetts and Maine, Benjamin Sever resided in Westminster and had[20]:

*  Occupants or possessors:  Benjamin Sever
*  Reputed owners:  Benjn Sever
*  157 acres and 120 perches of land
*  Valuation of $1014

He and Joseph Spaulding of Westminster bought 60 acres of upland in the northerly part of Westminster, being half of the farm, from Ephraim Wetherbee of Westminster for $77.50 on 4 March 1800.[3]  The land was bounded by Alpheus Whitney, Lincoln, Lind and Kendall.

In the 1800 U.S. census, Benjamin Sever was enumerated in Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts[21].  The household included:

*  2 males under age 10
*  1 male aged 10 to 16
*  1 male aged 26-45

*  2 females under age 10
*  2 females aged 10 to 16
*  1 female aged 26-45
*  1 female over age 45

Benjamin Seaver and Joseph Spaulding agreed to buy 62 acres in the northerly part of Westminster from Ephraim Wetherbee, unless Ephraim Wetherbee or his heirs paid $43.34 in one year from 1 January 1800; on 14 April 1801, Benjamin Seaver and Joseph Spaulding declared that they received $43.34 and were held harmless[4].

Farwell Jones, trader of Westminster, sold 34 acres, being part of lots 41 and 42 in Westminster, to Benjamin Seaver, yeoman of Westminster, on 11 January 1802 for $700[5].  The land was bounded by Benjamin Howard and the county road.

Jarvis Pierce, blacksmith of Westminster, and his wife Rhoda, sold part of lots 41 and 42 in Westminster to Benjamin Seaver, farmer of Westminster, on 3 March 1806 for $700[6].

In the 1810 U.S. Census, Benjamin Seaver was enumerated in Westminster, Worcester County, Massachusetts[7].  The household included:

*  1 male under age 10
*  1 male aged 10 to 16
*  2 males aged 16 to 26
*  1 male over age 45

*  1 female under age 10
*  1 female aged 10 to 16
*  1 female aged 16 to 26
*  1 female over age 45

Josiah Kendall of Sterling sold one and a half acres in the Beech Hill part of Westminster to Benjamin Seaver on 28 November 1811 for $30[8].

Luke Church of Hubbardston sold 49 acres of land in Hubbardston, part of the great farm number 7, to Benjamin Seaver, yeoman of Westminster, on 3 December 1814 for $246[9].

Benjamin Sever, yeoman of Westminster, sold 26 acres and 56 rods of the lot in Hubbardston to Sewell Barnes, cooper of Westminster, on 22 January 1815 for $123[22].  This was the southeasterly half of the great farm number 7 he bought from Luke Church.

Benjamin Seaver died in Westminster, worcester County, Massachusetts.  His death record in the Westminster vital records book says[10]:

SEAVER, Benjamin, June 24, 1816, a. 59. Revolutionary War soldier G.S. I

The estate of Benjamin Seaver is in Worcester County Probate Records, Probate Packet 52,865.  His widow, Martha, was appointed administratrix on 16 July 1816[12].  Bond for $1,000 was granted to William Penniman and Merari Spaulding, sureties on the same date .  A warrant of appraisal was also provided on that date.  On 1 October 1816, the inventory was appraised to be Real estate $4,626, and personal property of $1,082.70.

The inventory of the real estate included:

*         the Home farm of 194 acres 38 rods                        $ 2,321
*         the Stearns farm of 86 acres and 75 rods                 $ 1,515
*         the Willington pasture of 63 acres 22 rods               $   660
*         the Hubbardston lot of 26 acres and 56 rods           $   100
*         the Pew in meeting house                                         $     30

A petition for partition of the estate was received on 9 April 1817. A warrant was issued to William Penniman, Merari Spaulding and Horatio G. Buttrick, who filed their report, which was allowed on May 22, 181.  The real estate was apprised at $4,560, and partitioned 1/3 to the widow ($1,520), and 1/10 shares to each child ($304) of the remaining 2/3, divided as follows:

*  Widow Martha Sever received 72 acres of the Stearns lot, 26 acres of the Willington pasture, plus portions of the home lot for her use for a year, and the meeting house pew.

*  Eldest son Job Sever received the remaining 13 acres of the Stearns farm, the Hubbardston lot, and he paying to his sisters Achsah Mosman $15 and Susannah Seaver $40.

*  Son Benjamin Sever and daughter Abigail Fairbanks received 51 acres and 132 rods of the home farm, and equally paying the minor children $28 each.

*  Daughter Achsah Mosman received 38 acres of the home farm plus $15 from Job Sever.

*  Daughter Susannah Sever received 34 acres and 134 rods of the Willington pasture plus $40 from Job Sever.

*  Minor children Martha, Silas, Isaac, Rozilla and Mary Jane Sever received 104 acres of the home farm with all the buildings thereon, and to receive from brother Benjamin Seaver and Jabez Fairbank $14 each.

The partition was agreed to and signed by Martha Seaver, Job Seaver, Benjamin Seaver, Achsah Mosman, Jabez Fairbank, Susanna Sever and Heman Ray (as guardian of Martha, Silas, Isaac, Rozilla and Mary Jane Sever).

Martha Seaver filed her account on 2 December 1817 with a balance of $43.26, which was allowed and awarded to her on 6 January 1818.

Heman Ray of Westminster was appointed guardian of children Martha, Silas, Isaac, Rozilla, and Mary Jane Sever.  Heman Ray sold at auction the land in Westminster which was the minor children's portion to be used to secure the children for their benefit.  Ethan Sever of Gardner was the highest bidder, but he refused to take the deed and give security.  Heman Ray bargained with Benjamin Seaver, brother of the children, who agreed to buy the land for $1,480 on 14 January 1818.  A similar bargain was struck for $32 for the one and a half acre parcel purchased by Benjamin Seaver from Josiah Kendall, with Samuel Whitney being the highest bidder and refusing to take the deed and give security, dated 14 January 1818.

Job Sever received the Hubbardston lot as part of his legacy, and sold the 26 acres and 56 rods to his mother, Martha Sever, on 24 February 1819 for $550.

Martha Sever, widow woman of Westminster, sold the 26 acres and 56 rods of land in Hubbardston (part of Great Farm No. 7)  to Artemas Baker, yeoman of Hubbardston, on 3 January 1823 for $150.

Benjamin Seaver is buried in Plot 641 of Woodside Cemetery in Westminster[11,23].  The stone says he died 20 June 1816, age 59.  His wife, Martha is also buried in the plot.
 
5)  SOURCES

1. 1790 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Westminster: Page 663, Benjamin Seaver household; online image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com) citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M637, Roll 4.

2. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 130, Page 303, recorded 13 March 1798, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,844,348.

3. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 139, Page 566, recorded 9 April 1800, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,844,352.

4. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 141, Page 517, recorded 25 September 1800, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,844,353.

5. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 154, Page 626, recorded 8 June 1804, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,844,360.

6. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 203, Page 362, recorded 10 May 1817,on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,600.

7. 1810 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Westminster: Page 764, Benjn Seaver household; online image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com) citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M292, Roll 22.

8. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 203, Page 364, recorded 10 May 1817, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,600.

9. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 203, Page 363, recorded 3 December 1814, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,600.

10. Systematic History Fund, Vital Records of Westminster, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849 (Worcester, Mass.: F.P. Rice, 1908), Deaths, page 247: Benjamin Seaver entry.

11. Jim Tipton, indexed database, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com), Woodside Cemetery (Westminster, Mass.), Benjamin Seaver memorial.

12. "Worcester County, Massachusetts Probate Court Records" (Worcester County Probate Courthouse, Worcester, Mass.), Probate Packet #52,865, Benjamin Sever (1816) estate (also in Volume 202, page 253, accessed on FHL Microfilm 0,860,638), letter of administration.

13. Vital Records of Sudbury, Massachusetts to the year 1850 (Boston, Mass. : New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1903), Births, page 130, Benjamin Sever entry.

14. "Massachusetts, Town Clerk, Vital and Town Records, 1627-2001," digital images, FamilySearch (http://familysearch.org), Middlesex County, Sudbury, "Births, marriages, deaths, 1663-1829, Vol. 4," page 120 (penned), image 65 of 142, Benjamin Sever birth entry, 1757.

15. Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War (Boston, Mass. : 1905),  Volume XIII, page 1002, Benjamin Sever entry.

16. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), "Westminster Births, Marriages and Deaths,"  page 38 (penned, image 116 of 1195), Family of Benjamin and Marthy Seaver, 1784-1812.

17. "Worcester County, Massachusetts Probate Court Records", Volume 24, Page 358, Norman Seaver estate, accessed on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,856,314.

18. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 203, Page 366, recorded 10 May 1817, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,600.

19. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 203, Page 361, recorded 10 May 1817, on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,600.

20. "Massachusetts and Maine 1798 Direct Tax," indexed database and digital image, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org), Volume 14, page 296, Benjamin Sever entry.

21. 1800 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Worcester County, Massachusetts, Westminster: Page 451, Benjn Sever household; online image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com) citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M32, Roll 16.

22. Worcester County, Mass. Registrar of  Deeds, "Worcester County (Mass.) Deeds (1722-1866) and Index to Deeds (1731-1889)", Volume 199, Page 167, recorded 21 September 1815,  on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,845,598.

23. Woodside Cemetery (Westminster, Massachusetts), Grave Markers, Benjamin Seaver monument.

24. Vital Records of Sudbury, Massachusetts to the year 1850, Births, page 130, Benjamin Seaver entry.

25. Massachusetts, Town Records, 1620-1988, digital images, Ancestry.com, "Westminster Births, marriages and deaths," page 3 (penned), image 490, Marriage of Benjamin Sever and Marthy Whitney, 19 Aug 1783.

26. Systematic History Fund, Vital Records of Leominster, Massachusetts to the year 1849 (Worcester, Mass. : Franklin P. Rice, 1911), Marriages, page 255: Benjamin Sever and Martha Whitney entry.

27. Systematic History Fund, Vital Records of Westminster, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849, Marriages, page 186: Benjamin Sever and Martha Whiting entry (in Leominster).


==================================

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) Randall J. Seaver


Thursday, January 29, 2015

Dear Randy: Why Do You Write About Your Personal Research?

I get email, and sometimes it's about what I write on this blog on a weekly basis.  I appreciate the email, and the questions or comments are usually cogent and flattering.

The person asking this question thought that I was "clogging up" my blog with all of the "personal research" blog topics - the Amanuensis Monday, Wordless Wednesday, Treasure Chest Thursday, 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks, and Surname Saturday posts.  She wasn't overly interested in them, and rarely read them, and they clogged up her email in-box.

The answer is very simple - I write these "personal research" blog posts for all of these reasons:

1)  It's "cousin bait" - someone (a cousin) may use a search engine to see if anyone knows something about their ancestor.  

2)  It keeps me focus on my ancestral research:

**  For Amanuensis Monday, I transcribe a record I've found for an ancestor.  I then add the Event that the record supports, a source citation, a media item, and an Event Note to my RootsMagic database.  I collect the Amanuensis Monday posts on my Amanuensis Monday Posts page, thinking that they might help another researcher.


**  For Wordless Wednesday, I post a family photograph from my own family, and my parents family, and my cousins family, and describe the persons, the setting, the subject.  I may add my own memory about the people, the setting or the photograph.  I add the photograph to my digital photo file folders for the families in the photograph.  If my family members want to see my family photos, I have over 300 of them.

**  For Treasure Chest Thursday, I post a digital image of a record of interest, then transcribe or abstract it, and analyze it.  I then add the Event that the record supports, a source citation, a media item and an Event Note to my RootsMagic database.

**  For 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on Friday, I write a biography, in a narrative report form, of an ancestor, consisting of the events of the ancestor's life, the notes about the ancestor in a life sketch format, and the source citations that support the facts and notes provided.  Doing this in a logical sequence (I chose to do it by Ahnentafel number starting with #8, my paternal great-grandfather) helped me focus each week on that person, search for more records, add notes, media and source citations as required, to make it an intelligible report.  I am now through the 3rd great-grandparents and will now work on the 4th great-grandparents.

**  For Surname Saturday, I focus on one ancestral family line.  Again, this is "cousin bait" of sorts, but it often shows me that I need to do more research on the line.  I try to offer published reference information to help researchers find records for the family line if they are interested.  At present, I've worked my way down to the 8th great-grandmothers.

3)  I try to be a good example as a researcher.  By displaying different record types, crafting source citations, analyzing information, and writing about it may help other researchers do similar tasks.

4)  It's blog fodder.  I can always count on the daily themes like these to help me overcome blogger's block.

5)  It's my blog - I can write what I want to and when I want to.  

6)  Doing these posts each week really focuses me on my research - it "advances the ball" toward the goal of a complete and well-sourced database on my ancestral families.  The playing field is very long...I don't see the finish line!

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/dear-randy-why-do-you-write-about-your.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver




Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 248: 1900 U.S. Census Record for Auble Family in Terre Haute, Indiana

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the  1900 U.S. Census record for the Auble family in Terre Haute, Vigo County, Indiana:


The portion of the census page with the Auble family members:


The extracted information for the Auble family members, residing at 411 Chestnut Street):

*  Frances M. Auble - head of household, white, female, born Oct 1846, age 53, single, 0 children born, born New Jersey, father born New Jersey, mother born New Jersey, occupation: a school teacher, 0 months not employed, can read, can write, can speak English, owns a house free of mortgage.
*  Sarah G. Auble - mother, white, female, born Jan 1818, age 82, widowed, had 6 children, 5 living, born New Jersey, father born New York, mother born New Jersey, can read, can write, can speak English.
*  Catherine Auble - sister, white, female, born Oct 1851, age 48, single, had 0 children, born New Jersey, father born New Jersey, mother born New Jersey, can read, can write, can speak English.

The source citation for this record is:

1900 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Vigo County, Indiana, Terre Haute Ward 6, ED 112, Sheet 14B, Dwelling 269, Family 319, Frances M. Auble household; indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 27 November 2013), citing National Archives Microfilm Publication T623, Roll 409.

This address is the same location that David and Sarah (Knapp) Auble resided in the 1880 U.S. census.  There are 13 of "roomers" in this household between the ages of 19 and 31, and all of their occupations are "student."  Apparently, they turned this house into a dormitory for students attending a local college.

This is the last record I have found for my 2nd great-grandmother, Sarah G. (Knapp) Auble.  I do not know her death date or death place, although I think it was probably in Terre Haute where her two daughters resided.


Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Wednesday, January 28, 2015

Are You Reading the Geneapalooza Blog?

I love genealogy humor, and really enjoy the Geneapalooza blog (http://geneapalooza.blogspot.com/) written by Esto Frigus.  The header on the blog says:

"Exposing the world of genealogy, every Monday/Wednesday/Friday, one panel at a time."

Here are screen shots of two recent offerings:

1)  Today, 28 January 2015:


2)  14 January 2015:


(enlarge the images by clicking on them or go to the website)

The strip is published three times a week, on Monday, Wednesday and Friday.

I really recommend starting at the beginning of the strip, back in June 2014.  There is a convenient Archive for 2014 and 2015 at http://geneapalooza.blogspot.com/p/strip-archive.html in publication order (oldest first).

The main characters are a relatively young couple, and the young lady decides to do genealogy research.  In the process, the strip hits most of the high and low points about the genealogy community, and meets many "interesting" characters, without naming names, all while pursuing her own research.  Sometimes the individual strips are part of a series, and other times they are not.

I look forward to reading this three times a week.  It's really the only pure "genealogy humor" published on a regular basis in blog format.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/are-you-reading-geneapalooza-blog.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


My "Beginning Computer Genealogy" OASIS Class is Mondays, March 9-30, 2015

There is a senior adult education organization called OASIS that focuses on lifelong learning, active lifestyles, and community involvement.  There are local OASIS organizations in many U.S. cities.

In San Diego, the OASIS website is at http://www.oasisnet.org/SanDiegoCA.aspx.  They publish a catalog of educational classes, lectures, and activities each trimester.  The current catalog is for January to April 2015 and is online at http://www.oasisnet.org/LinkClick.aspx?fileticket=mx0o6zoEM3E%3d&tabid=1267


I did a search for "genealogy" in the San Diego catalog, and found several entries:

1)  "Beginning Computer Genealogy" by Randy Seaver, 4 Mondays, March 9, 16, 23 and 30 from 10:15 a.m. to 12:15 p.m., at Mission Valley Macy's, Fee is $56:


2)  "Me, My Family and I" by Jill R. Scott on Tuesday, April 7 from 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. at San Marcos Senior Center, Fee is $14:


3)  "Computer Genealogy" by Anne Renshaw, on January 21, and another class on February 4, from 1:30 p.m. to 3 p.m., at Escondido Senor Center, Fee is $10:


To sign up for any class, register at San Diego OASIS (http://www.oasisnet.org/SanDiegoCA/HowtoRegister.aspx).

I've been doing my class three times a year since 2009, and a number of my students have joined local genealogical societies and are doing well in their research.  Unfortunately, two of my 2014 classes were cancelled due to lack of interest.

If these San Diego classes interest you, then please sign up for any or all of them, attend them and use what you learn to extend your genealogy research.

If you live outside of San Diego, investigate if there are similar classes in your local area.  If you have a local OASIS organization, and they don't have a genealogy class, you could volunteer to teach one if you feel capable.

If you have a local OASIS organization, consider signing up for other classes also.  In San Diego, the catalog has many classes on computer usage to help you master computer basics, specific programs, social media, and more.

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Ping Pong Stars of 1956 -- Post 344 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

I'm posting old family photographs from my collection on Wednesdays, but they won't be wordless posts like others do - I simply am incapable of having a wordless post.

Here is one of the most precious (to me) images from my Seaver/Carringer family collection:




This photograph was taken in about 1956 in the patio next to 2114 Fern Street.  My home was in the building in the right background on the second floor.  

The four young males, participating in the 1956 30th Street ping-pong championship, in the photo above are (from the left):

*  my best friend at the time, Gordon
*  me, Randy, age 12, in the glasses
*  I don't know who this one is, perhaps Kert, Stan's friend?
*  my brother, Stan, age 9.

During the spring, summer and fall, we often had a ping pong table set up in the patio and my brother Stan and I played, or my whole family played, or we had friends over and played ping pong.

Other sporting events happened in the patio - there was a basketball hoop, and we had ferocious whiffle ball games during the summer with our friends.  I wish I had more pictures of the patio games.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/ping-pong-stars-of-1956-post-344-of-not.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Syllabus Materials Available at RootsTech 2015 Website

I discussed the RootsTech 2015 Conference classes yesterday in RootsTech 2015 Conference - News and Sessions.

I wondered about the syllabus materials for RootsTech 2015 - would they be printed, on a CD or flash drive, or just online?  The Frequently Asked Questions page provides the answer:

"How can I access syllabus materials from the conference?

"Syllabus materials are available for download for a limited time on the RootsTech website, typically from two to four weeks prior to the conference to two to three months after. We do not provide printed or digital copies of the syllabus materials"

On the About : 2015 Class Syllabus page, there are links to every available syllabus handout, grouped by the Pass Type.


I clicked on the "RootsTech (RT1100s-1200s) link and the list of presentations in this group appeared:


I clicked on the first one on the list, and saw the syllabus for that class:


So I created a RootsTech 2015 file folder and started downloading the syllabus articles to the file folder.  Two problems:

*  After downloading one article, I used the "Back" button to return to the list and had to open the list again.  After the first one, I right-clicked the presentation title and saved the next one in a new tab, then closed it after I saved it.  That kept the list on the Syllabus tab.

*  Not every class has a handout available.  I found three classes with a 404 error today.

I didn't download every handout available, but I did most of them.  It took about 90 minutes because I skim-read many of them.

I may change my class selections after seeing some of the Getting Started classes.

NOTES:

1)  There is no registration required for the RootsTech syllabus materials.  Anyone can read and download them to their computer.  They may be removed some time after the conference.  Of course, you cannot see the presentation slides or hear the speaker embellish on bullet points.

2)  I looked again at the RootsTech 2015 mobile app and a PDF icon appears on those that are available.  As of today, only about 10% of the titles have a PDF icon.  You tap on the title, then on the "Resources" tab, then on the "Handouts" tab, and on the title again and select where to download it.  Downloaded handouts appear in the "Downloads" icon on the app Dashboard.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/syllabus-materials-available-at.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


WikiTree Provides More DNA Information About Relatives

I wrote WikiTree DNA Confirmation Aid Results on 26 June 2014, and then did not do much after investigating it and writing about it.

I saw Kitty Cooper's post last week (Organizing DNA Results With Your Genealogy: WIKItree.com), and went exploring in WikiTree again.  After updating my DNA test information, the program provided much more DNA-related information (after an overnight wait).

1)  On my WikiTree Home Nav page, I clicked on the "My WikiTree" link (at the top of the page) and selected the "DNA Confirmation" link:


2)  The "DNA Confirmation" page shows information about me and my ancestors through third great-grandparents.  It provides a summary of tests that have already been performed by myself (and others if they share the ancestor).  It identifies the males in my Y-chromosome DNA line and the females in my mitochondrial DNA line.


There are three more tabs at the top of the screen above - for "DNA Tests," "DNA Ancestors" and "DNA Descendants."

3)  Here is my page for "DNA Tests:"


I can Edit this page if I take another DNA test.

4)  Here is the DNA Ancestors page, which is pretty useful.  If you look closely, you can see icons for Y-DNA, X-DNA, mtDNA and auDNA on the appropriate persons (three screens):




The page above provides a list of my Y-chromosome DNA matches (my Seaver patrilineal line), my mitochondrial DNA matches (my matrilineal line), and my X-chromosome DNA matches (based on the rules for mitochondrial lines (males received only their mothers X, females receive X from both fathers and mothers).

5)  For the "DNA Descendants" page, I went back to one of my ancestors (since I don't have descendants in WikiTree) and saw a dropdown descendants list that provided Y and X chromosome descendants.  Since I used a male, it didn't list mitochondrial DNA descendants since there are none.


6)  This would be extremely helpful if everybody who has contributed to WikiTree had input their DNA tests, and had ancestors in common with me.  

Alas, not many WikiTreers have input their DNA information, and absolutely no person that I looked at has another WikiTreer with a  DNA match to me.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/wikitree-provides-more-dna-information.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Tuesday's Tip - Search Ancestry.com Hints by Record Collection

This week's Tuesday's Tip is:  Use Ancestry.com Hints for a Specific Database to Add Content to Your Ancestry.com Member Tree.

Did you know that you can filter your Ancestry.com green leaf Hints by record collection?  I currently have over 41,000 Hints in my "big" tree with almost 43,000 persons in it.  More are being added every day.

How do I deal with them?  Well, I've chosen to add content to my Ancestry Member Tree (facts, sources, images) by mining individual databases.  I manually add the events, sources and images to my RootsMagic database also.  I find this process easier to handle one database at a time rather than one person at a time, or one page of Hints (20 Hints per page, so I have over 2,000 pages to look at!).  When I finish a selected database, I have a feeling of accomplishment.  And I've added content and sources that enrich my database and may help other researchers who find the information in my Ancestry Member Tree.

I've written about searching Ancestry.com databases by record collection previously in:

*  Finding Record Hints for Persons in a Specific Database on Ancestry.com (posted 15 October 2014) 

*  More on Finding Record Hints for a Specific Database on Ancestry.com (posted 17 October 2014).

*  Demonstrating Adding Ancestry.com Hints in a Specific Database to my RootsMagic Database (30 October 2014)

If you read those posts, you can see that there are two key numbers to learn:

*  Your Ancestry Member Tree number - if you open your Ancestry Member Tree to the tree chart, the Tree number is in the URL (Internet address) at the top of your screen.  

*  The Ancestry.com database number for the selected database.

Let me demonstrate it again here.  

1)  The screen below shows my Pedigree view of my Ancestry Member Tree:


At the top of the browser page (not shown above) is the URL (Internet address) for this Ancestry Member Tree:


The URL is http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/71134866/family

My Ancestry Member Tree number is the 8-digit number in the URL:  71134866.

2)  Use the Ancestry.com Card Catalog to find the database number of the database you want to search.  I chose the World War I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918.


In the URL line on my browser is the address for this specific database.  It is:

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=6482

The Ancestry database number for the World War I Draft Registration database is number 6482.

3)  Now, the magic URL to search my Ancestry Member Tree (71134866) by this specific database (6482) is:

http://trees.ancestry.com/tree/71134866/hints?src=hw&hf=record&hs=last&hdbid=6482

You will have to substitute your own Ancestry Member Tree number and the database number that you want to search.  You can add my URL above into your browser but don't click Enter.  Put your cursor in the URL and substitute your Ancestry Member Tree number in place of mine and the database number you selected.  Once I had these numbers in my browser address line, I saved the URL in my Bookmarks so I could easily use it again.

4)  When I plugged the URL for the World War I Draft Registrations into my browser, I received my results:



I had 191 entries for persons in my Ancestry Member Tree in the World war I Draft Registration Cards, 1917-1918 collection.  I can then go through these one at a time, attaching or rejecting the record image to persons in my tree, which will also attach the Ancestry.com source citation, and adding the information to my RootsMagic database.

I usually click on the link for the record for the person - in the screen above I chose the link to the image for Leslie Delmar Acker, the first person on the list above:


I can add the pertinent information to my RootsMagic database, and a source citation to Evidence Explained standards (note that Ancestry.com's source citations are not to EE standards).  

The World War I Draft Registrations, 1917-1918 are for males born between 1874-1900, and the coverage is fairly complete.  The record always contains a full name, a birth date, a current location, an employer, a next of kin, a signature, and a description of the person.  This is an excellent record for males born in that time period; some states do not have birth indexes or certificates for that time period.  

5)  Ancestry.com is still finding Hints for me (about 5-10 each day!), so I will have to revisit these specific databases every so often.  So far I've completed the Social Security Death Index, the 1940 U.S. Census, and Find A Grave using this process.  I'm currently working in the 1930 U.S. Census.  

My experience is that the Hints provided are 95% to 100% accurate - the Ancestry.com search engines are excellent.  Of course, they don't find everything due to really different name spelling variations, or errors in my Ancestry Member Tree.  My guess is that they find 80% to 90% of the possible matches.  

This process works well for me - I continue to add content and source citations to my database, enriching the profiles of my Tree persons gradually, one record at a time.  I have a feeling of accomplishment when I finish a database.

It makes more sense to me to let Ancestry's search engines do these tasks rather than fumble with search field entries.  It saves me time, and energy, and I can sleep at night while Ancestry.com works to find records for my Tree persons.  

6)  It would be really helpful if Ancestry.com would enable this to be done with one click - for example, a link on the selected database page that says "Search your Ancestry Member Tree for persons with entries in this database."  

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/01/tuesdays-tip-search-ancestrycom-hints.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver