Friday, August 26, 2016

Adding Descendant Information the Easy Way - Post 2: Exporting it to an Ancestry Member Tree

I wrote Finding Descendants of Rudolph Spangler (1738-1811) In the FamilySearch Family Tree on 23 August 2016, and followed that with Adding Descendant Information the Easy Way - Post 1: Importing it From FamilySearch Family Tree on 25 August 2016.  In the latter post, I laid out the steps I'm taking to add descendants of Rudolph Spangler to my RootsMagic database, starting from the FamilySearch Family Tree.

Step 2 in my process was to create a GEDCOM file in RootsMagic.  I did that yesterday, and did some cleanup of duplicate persons and nameless persons before I created the GEDCOM file.

Step 3 is to upload the GEDCOM file to a new Ancestry Member Tree, so that Ancestry will find Hints and Suggested Records for me without my having to search for them.  Here is that process:

1)  On my Ancestry Home Page, I clicked on "Trees" and selected "Create and Manage Trees:"


2)  When I clicked on "Create and Manage Trees" my list of current trees opened, and at the bottom of the list was "Create a new tree" and "Upload a GEDCOM file:"


3)  I clicked on "Upload a GEDCOM file" and filled in the information on the screen:


I chose the GEDCOM file that I created for "Rudolf Spangler Descendants," added a short description of the tree,  and clicked that I accept the Submission Agreement.

4)  I clicked the orange "Upload" button on the screen above, and within seconds my new Ancestry Member Tree with 1,349 persons was uploaded.  My tree opened in the Family View, and I clicked on the down arrow by the tree name to open the dropdown menu with the different tree options available:


5)  I chose "Tree Settings" from the dropdown menu, and made the home person Rudolph Spangler, and identified myself in the tree:


6)  All of this took about four minutes to complete - it's really easy for a small tree like this.  I clicked the down arrow next to the tree name in the upper left-hand corner, and clicked on the "All Hints" item and saw:


In the four minutes from upload to clicking "All Hints," the Ancestry Hinting system has generated 277 Hints, of which 99 are Ancestry Member Trees and 178 are Records.  

7)  Step 3 in this process is completed, so now I will wait a bit before I go on to Step 4 in my process, which is to Let Ancestry find more Hints for persons in this tree.  I may have to help them along, though!

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Book Announcement: Fostering Family History Services: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Volunteers

I received this book announcement from the authors of this book:

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Clark, Rhonda L. & Nicole Wedemeyer Miller. Fostering Family History Services: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Volunteers. Libraries Unlimited. Feb. 2016. 269p. illus. bibliog. index. ISBN 9781610695411. pap. $55; ebk. ISBN 9781610695428.

Websites, social media, and the Internet have made research on family history accessible. Your library can tap into the popularity of the do­-it-yourself genealogy movement by promoting your role as both a preserver of local community history as well as a source for helping your patrons archive what's important to their family. This professional guide will teach you how to integrate family history programming into your educational outreach tools and services to the community.

The book is divided into three sections: the first introduces methods for creating a program to help your clients trace their roots; the second provides library science instruction in reference and planning for local collections; and the third part focuses on the use of specific types of resources in local collections. Additional information features methods for preserving photographs, letters, diaries, documents, memorabilia, and ephemera. The text also includes bibliographies, appendices, checklists, and links to online aids to further assist with valuating and organizing important family
mementos.

FEATURES

*  Discusses the reference environment and offers tips for strategic planning for local studies
Includes hints of how to assess, organize, discard, or donate family heirlooms

*  Offers suggestions for caring for family history archives, including physical enclosures, digital copies, and the importance of data backups

*  Features templates for partnership agreements with other organizations

Rhonda L. Clark, PhD, is associate professor of information and library science at Clarion University of Pennsylvania. Her published works include several articles on local collection reference and digitization in Annual Review of Cultural Informatics and Electronic Records and Resource Management Implementation in Diverse Environments. Clark holds a doctorate in Russian history from the University of Minnesota and a master's degree in library science from the University of Pittsburgh.

Nicole Wedemeyer Miller, MA, MLS, teaches a course on genealogy and library service at the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Illinois, Urbana­Champaign.  She also teaches various family history courses and seminars at the Champaign County Historical Archives. Previously, she was a reference librarian in academic and public libraries for more than 12 years. She holds a master's degree in English literature from Northern Illinois University as well as a Master of Library Science from the University of Illinois and has published several articles in genealogy and local history journals.

From the email from the authors:

We have just published a new book called Fostering Family History Services: A Guide for Librarians, Archivists, and Volunteers. This is not a how-to genealogy title, rather a guide for those of us who work with other genealogists. A variety of topics are covered including how to conduct a genealogical reference interview, planning programming, oral history projects, dealing with old photographs, providing good collection access, digitization projects, and more. This is the first book to cover this subject.

Further information on the book can be found online.  A short video explaining how this writing project began can be found here: https://www.facebook.com/fosteringfamilyhistoryservices/


Excerpts can be found both on Amazon and Google Books.

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday, 26 August 2016

I received this press release from Findmypast today:

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New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday




Over 7.5 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including;


Over 4 million new records have just been added to our collection of United States Marriage records including substantial new additions from New York, Massachusetts, Michigan, Pennsylvania and Arkansas. Released in partnership with FamilySearch international, these latest additions mark the second phase of efforts to create the single largest online collection of U.S. marriage records in history. Covering 360 years of marriages from 1650-2010, when complete this landmark collection will contain at least 100 million records and more than 450 million names from 2,800 counties across America. The records include transcripts and images of the original documents that list marriage date, the names of the bride and groom, birthplace, birth date, age, residence as well as fathers' and mothers' names.


Victoria Coastal Passenger lists contains over 3.2 million records taken from the Public Record Office Victoria series VPRS 944 Inward Passenger Lists (Australian Ports). The collection includes records of both those travelling from overseas and those travelling locally (from coast to coast) and can provide a missing link in your ancestor’s journey if you’ve been unable to find out how they arrived at their known Australian residence. Each result contains a transcript and an image of the original document. Transcripts will generally reveal your ancestors name, marital status, occupation, birth year and details of their voyage including their date of departure, date of arrival, port of departure and port of arrival. 


Britain, Enemy Aliens and Internees, First and Second World Wars contains over 139,000 records of foreign born men and women who were investigated and interned in camps across the United Kingdom and the Commonwealth during the First and Second World Wars. Released in association with The National Archives, the records are comprised of enemy alien index cards from the Home Office, nominal rolls, correspondence, Prison Commission records and much more. They include people from Germany, Italy, Japan, Austria, Finland, Bulgaria, Hungary, and Romania, and range from individual index cards recording a person’s movements and background to nominal rolls of camp inmates.


Browse the collection by conflict, series, or piece. A list of all series included in the collection is available at the bottom of the search page. 


Britain, Children's Employment Commission Part 2, 1842 is an illuminating social document about the state of child workers in the nineteenth century. It was created by the Royal Commission of Inquiry to investigate the condition and treatment of child workers. Sub-commissioners travelled across Great Britain and Ireland interviewing children and young adults, as well as parents, adult employees, educators, medical professionals, and clergymen. These documents are presented in a Portable Document Format (PDF). You can search the documents by name or keyword, or you can read the entire commission from beginning to end.


Did your ancestor work in a factory as a child? Read through this fascinating account, which offers insight into the daily working conditions for children in the early nineteenth century. If you discover your ancestor’s name within the document, your ancestor most likely owned a factory or was employed in a factory.


9,2647 images from 20 assorted publications have been added in our latest update. The articles, photos, and maps found within PERSI can help flush out the historical context of your family history research.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


52 Ancestors - Week 139: #184 Benedict Oatley (1732-1821)

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I am extending this theme in 2016 to 156 Ancestors in 156 Weeks. Here is my ancestor biography for week #139:

Benedict Oatley (1732-1821) is #184 on my Ahnentafel list, my 5th great-grandfather, who married #185 Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814) in 1755.

I am descended through:

*  their son #92 Joseph Oatley
 (1756-1815) who married #93 Mary Hazard (1765-1857) in 1781.
*  their son #46 Jonathan Oatley (1790-1872) who married #47 Amy Champlin (1798-1865) in 1823. 
*  their daughter #23 Amy Frances Oatley (1826-1864) who married #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) in 1844.
*  their daughter #11 Julie E. White (1848-1913), who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) in 1868. 
*  their daughter #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962), who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) in 1900.
* their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983), who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                    Benedict Oatley[1–5]
*  Alternate Name: Benedict Oatly[6–9]       
*  Sex:                        Male   

*  Father:                  Jonathan Oatley (1689-1755)   
*  Mother:                Deliverance (1700-1734)   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Birth:                    25 December 1732, South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1–2]   
*  Estate:                  8 September 1755 (age 22), bequeathed property by his father; South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[5]   
*  Census:               1774 (about age 42), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[6]   
*  Census:              1777 (about age 45), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[3]   
*  Census:             1 August 1790 (age 57), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[7]   
*  Census:             1 June 1800 (age 67), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[8]   
*  Census:            1 June 1810 (age 77), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[4]   
*  Death:              1 August 1821 (age 88) , South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1]    
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Spouse 1:         Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814)   
*  Marriage 1:      2 October 1755 (age 22), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1,9]   

*  Child 1:             Joseph Oatley (1756-1815)   
*  Child 2:             Rhoda Oatley (1758-    )   
*  Child 3:             Abigail Oatley (1760-1831)   
*  Child 4:             Susannah Oatley (1762-    )   
*  Child 5:             Jonathan Oatley (1764-    )   
*  Child 6:             Lucy Oatley (1766-1814)   
*  Child 7:             Benedict Oatley (1773-1849)   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

Benedict Oatley was the fourth child and second son of Jonathan and Deliverance (--?--) Oatley[1].  He was born 25 December 1732 in South Kingstown, Rhode Island.  The entry in the Rhode Island Vital Record book for the children of Jonathan Oatley (with both wives) says[2]:

*  Samuel Oatley, born Oct. 23, 1726
*  Rebecca Oatley, born Sept. 10, 1728
*  Rhoda Oatley, born Dec. 29, 1730
*  Benedict Oatley, born Dec. 25, 1732
*  Joseph Oatley, born March 11, 1739

Benedict Oatley's father, Jonathan Oatley (1689-1755), wrote his will on 25 July 1755, which was proved on 8 September 1755, and named his son Benedict Oatley the executor of his estate[5].  In his will, he bequeathed Benedict Oatley "...all my Housing & Homestead Bounded Northerly on an Highway Easterly & Southerly on land of Joseph Torry & Westerly on land of James Willson. To him his heirs and assigns forever, He paying to his mother in law & his Brother Samuel the legacies before mentioned and given, and all my Just Debts also I bequeath to him my great Bible."


Also:  "... to my two sons Samuel and Benedict all my wearing apparel and what Cloath is in the House not made into any garment to be Equally divided Between Them -- and my Will is that all my Books not herein before disposed of be equally divided between my said Wife and my said son Benedict."

He was married by the Rev. Dr. Joseph Torrey of the Church of Christ, South Kingstown, Rhode Island on October 22, 1755 to Elizabeth Ladd[1,9],  who was born at Little Compton, Rhode Island on July 9, 1733 and died at South Kingstown, Rhode Island on November 27, 1814[1].

They had seven children born between 1756 and 1773 in South Kingstown.  All of the births were recorded in the South Kingstown town records[1].

Benedict was a weaver by trade and was admitted a "Freeman to the Colony on the 1st Wednesday of May 1757[1]

Benedict Oatley  lived in the Oatley Homestead until April 29, 1769 when he sold the house and lot, that was willed to him by his father, to his brother Samuel Oatley[1].  

In the 1774 Rhode Island census, the Benedict Oatly household had 11 occupants[6]:

*  Two white males above age 16
*  Two white males under age 16
*  Two white females above age 16

*  Five white females under age 16

Benedict Oatley, because of his physical disability or age was unable to bear arms.  Son, Joseph served in the Revolutionary War[1].

In the 1777 Rhode Island Military Census, Benedict Oatley was enumerated in the 16-50 age group, and was marked "U" meaning unable to serve[3].

In the 1790 United States Census, the Benedict Oatly household in South Kingstown, Rhode Island had[7]:

*  two free white males over 16
*  three free white females

An interesting note in the vital statistics and records of the Town Hall in S. Kingstown under the date of 1797 is where Benedict and his son, Benedict, are taxed $.71 and $.67 respectively "For Meding highways"[1]

In the 1800 United States Census, the Benedick Oatly household in South Kingstown, Rhode Island had 4 residents[8]:

*  one male over age 45
*  one female under age 10
*  one female age 16 to 26
*  one female over age 45.

In the 1810 United States Census, the Benedict Oatley household was enumerated in South Kingstown, Rhode Ialand.  The household included[4]:

*  one free white male over age 45
*  two free white females over age 45

Benedict Oatley died 1 August 1821, according to the South Kingstown town records.  No gravestone marks his burial location[1].  

No probate records were found for Benedict Oatley in the South Kingstown town records.

5)  SOURCES

1. Harry J. Oatley, The Oatley Family in America and Their Descendants (Providence, R.I. : The Oatley Family Association, 1970), page 26, Benedict Oatley sketch.

2. "Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), Volume 5, "Washington County Births, Marriages and Deaths," page 50, (image 170 of 523), Benedict Oatley birth entry.

3. "The Rhode Island 1777 Military Census," indexed database with digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), South Kingstown, page 102, Joseph Oatley entry.

4. 1810 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Rhode Island, population schedule, South Kingstown, page 85, Benedict Oatley household, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M292, Roll 59.

5. South Kingston (R.I.) Town Clerk, "Town Council Records, 1704-1943,"  (South Kingston, R.I.), on 8 microfilm reels, Volume 5, Pages 25-27, Jonathan Oatley estate papers, on FHL Microfilm 0,931,834.

6. "Rhode Island Census, 1774," indexed database, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), page 89, South Kingstown, Benedict Oatly entry.

7. 1790 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Rhode Island, population schedule, South Kingston, page 92, Benedict Oatly household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M637, Roll 10.

8. 1800 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Rhode Island, population schedule, South Kingstown, page 701, Benedict Oatley household, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M32, Roll 46.

9. "Rhode Island Marriages, 1724-1916," indexed database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), Benedict Oatly and Elizabeth Ladd, 02 Oct 1755; citing South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, reference 22395 p. 142; FHL microfilm 22,395.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, August 25, 2016

Adding Descendant Information the Easy Way - Post 1: Importing it From FamilySearch Family Tree

I wrote Finding Descendants of Rudolph Spangler (1738-1811) In the FamilySearch Family Tree on 23 August 2016, and reader James asked me in email:

"OK, you found 793 descendants of Rudolph Spangler, how are you going to add their information to your RootsMagic database?  Don't you already have some of them?"

Two good questions, and my responses are:

1)  Here is the process I am going to use to improve my RootsMagic database and the FamilySearch Family Tree entries:

*  Step 1)  Download the descendants of Rudolph Spangler that are in the FamilySearch Family Tree into a new RootsMagic database, 
*  Step 2)   Create a GEDCOM file of that database
*  Step 3)  Upload the GEDCOM to a new Ancestry Member Tree.  
*  Step 4)  Let Ancestry find the records for those persons in the Hints, Suggested Records, and Searches
*  Step 5)  Add the pertinent names, relationships, events, dates, places, and sources to my master RootsMagic database manually.  
*  Step 6)  Match the new persons in my RootsMagic database with the FamilySearch Family Tree persons and add or correct information as needed.

2)  I already do have some of them for my particular line from Rudolph Spangler, so I will double check the Ancestry Hints for those persons and add content and sources for them as necessary.  However, I am more interested in the descendants of the siblings of my Spangler ancestors - these are also my cousins and may be DNA matches.  

Step 1 is to download the descendants of Rudolph Spangler from the FamilySearch Family Tree into a new RootsMagic database.  Here is the process for Step 1:

1)  I clicked on File > New on my RootsMagic screen and the "Create a new RootsMagic file" screen opened.  [Note:  I want to create a NEW RootsMagic database so that the information I import doesn't create problems in my "Master" RootsMagic database.] I gave my new database a name - "Rudolf Spangler Descendants" - and picked "Import information from another program."


2)  Now I want to Import persons from the FamilySearch Family Tree.  This can be performed from within the RootsMagic 7 program in the Main > FamilySearch Central menu item:


3)  The "FamilySearch Central" screen opened, and I clicked on the "Import" button on the screen, and the "Import a Tree From FamilySearch" screen appeared.  I had to go look for the FamilySearch ID for Rudolf Spangler (it is LCRX-2X9) and picked 0 Ancestors and 6 Descendants for the "Generations to import."


4)  I clicked on the "Import" button, and the importing process started - you can watch the names flash by almost one at a time.  I took this screen shot at the beginning of the process:


5)  The Import took about 12 minutes to bring in 1402 names (and their births, baptisms, marriages, deaths and burials) from the FamilySearch Family Tree into my "Rudolf Spangler Descendants" RootsMagic database:


6)  I "Close"d the screen and looked at my new RootsMagic database.  

What a mess - there are many ? names, no list of children is in date order, there are some of duplicate persons, there are few standard place names, etc.  It is apparent that very few persons have worked on this Spangler branch of the FamilySearch Family Tree, with the exception of my branch from Daniel Spangler.  I spent about an hour trying to clean up some of the obvious problems, and now have a tree with 1349 persons.

7)  Step 2 is to create a GEDCOM file for this Spangler database.  I will do that and then do Step 3 to import the GEDCOM file into a new Ancestry Member Tree in the next post in this series.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/08/adding-descendant-information-easy-way.html

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 328: Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814) Birth Record

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the birth record of Elizabeth Ladd (1735-1814) in Little Compton, Newport County, Rhode Island:



The birth records for Joseph Ladd, his wife Lydia and their children are:



The extracted information for the the Joseph Ladd family is:

*  LADD Joseph, Oct. 19, 1701
*  LADD, Lydia (Gray), his wife, Oct. 16, 1707
*  LADD, Deborah, of Joseph and Lydia,     May 16, 1732
*  LADD, Joseph,                                           Aug. 16, 1733
*  LADD, Elizabeth,                                      July 9, 1735
*  LADD, William,                                        Oct. 16, 1737
*  LADD, Lydia,                                           Sept. --, 1740

The source citation for the birth of Elizabeth Ladd is:

"Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 23 June 2014), Volume 4, Newport County Vital Records, Little Compton Births and Deaths, page 134 (image 501 of 691), Elizabeth Ladd birth entry.

This book is a Derivative Source, with Primary Information and Direct Evidence of the name, birth date and birth place of Elizabeth Ladd and her siblings.  This book refers to the Little Compton town record book, which apparently has the births of the Ladd children in Volume 2, page 43.  I have not searched for the Little Compton town records that have this birth record, but I know the volume and page number to find it.  

Elizabeth "Betsy" Ladd (1735-1814) is my 5th great-grandmother.  She married Benedict Oatley (1732-1821)  in 1755, and they had seven children. 

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The URL for this post is:   http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/08/treasure-chest-thursday-post-328.html

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.