Thursday, March 26, 2015

Example Source Citations for the New York City Birth, Marriage and Death Indexes on FamilySearch

After FamilySearch released the New York City Birth, Marriage and Death indexes last week, I started "mining" the three collections for Seaver persons, hoping to find more accurate content (names, dates, places, spouse's maiden name, parents names, etc.) than I had in my database.  In some cases, I did not have the person in my database, which led to some online research to try to connect the person to parents in my database.

In the process of adding content, I needed to also add source citations for the records.  In this post, I want to provide some example source citations for the three record collections:

1)  Births:

I was able to add a birth date, birth place and middle name for the birth of Philip Barber Seaver.  The parents names are always given.  The source citation is:

"New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909," indexed database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 March 2015), Philip Barber Seaver entry, 10 August 1905.

2)  Marriages:


I was able to add a marriage date and place for the marriage of Alfred L. Seaver and Anna Allen Brown.  The parents names, approximate birth years and birthplaces of both persons are usually given.  The source citation is:

"New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1866-1938," indexed database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 March 2015), Alfred L. Seaver and Anna Allen Brown entry, 15 April 1919.

3)  Deaths:

I was able to add a death date and death place for Philip Barber Seaver.  The parents names are sometimes given.  The source citation is:

"New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949," indexed database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 26 March 2015), Philip Barber Seaver entry, 12 August 1905.

If researchers use these record collections, they can copy and paste these source citations into their database, and substitute names, event date and access date for their own findings.

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 255: 1798 Direct Tax Assessment for Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1820) in Townsend, Mass.

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the  Massachusetts and Maine 1798 Direct Tax record for Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1820):

a)  Volume 11, Page 10, Townsend, Massachusetts:


b)  Volume 11, Page 49, Townsend, Massachusetts:


The extracted information from the two records for Zachariah Hildreth are:

a)  Volume 11, Page 10, List of Dwelling Houses, including Outhouses, and the Lots they are erected, owned or possessed on October 1, 1798:

*  Names of Occupants or Possessors:  Zachar. Hildrith
*  Names of reputed owners:  Hildrith Zachariah
*  Town:  Townsend
*  Number of Houses Exempted from Valuation:  0
*  Number of Dwelling Houses &c included in the valuation:  1 dwelling house, 
*  Quantity of land:  80 perches
*  Valuation determined by principal assessors:  200 Dollars
*  Valuation as revised and equalized by the commissioners:  220 Dollars

b)  Volume 11, Page 49, List of Land, Lots, Buildings and Wharves owned or possessed on October 1, 1798, excepting Dwelling Houses

*  Names of Occupants or Possessors:  Zachariah Hildreth
*  Names of reputed owners:  Hildrith Zachariah
*  Town:  Townsend
*  Number of Houses Exempted from Valuation:  0
*  Number of Dwelling Houses &c included in the valuation:  0 
*  Quantity of land:  a) 100 acres; b) 44 acres; c) 2 acres, 80 perches
*  Valuation determined by principal assessors:  a) 1110; b) 110; c) 30 Dollars
*  Valuation as revised and equalized by the commissioners:  a) 1221; b) 121; c) 33 Dollars
*  Whole Valuation of lands possessed by one person:  1375 Dollars

The source citations for these two documents are:

a)  "Massachusetts and Maine 1798 Direct Tax," indexed database and digital image, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org), Volume 11, Townsend, Massachusetts, Page 10 of 720, Dwelling Houses, Zachariah Hildrith listing.

b)  "Massachusetts and Maine 1798 Direct Tax," indexed database and digital image, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org), Volume 11, Townsend, Massachusetts, Page 49 of 720, Land, Lots, Buildings and Wharves, Zachariah Hildreth listing.

In October 1798, Zachariah Hildreth is age 4, has a second wife and six living children.  He owns a dwelling house assessed at $220, and 146 acres of land assessed at $1,375 for this tax assessment.

In both records, the valuations determined by the principal assessors were "revised and equalized" by increasing the valuation by 10% by the Commissioners.  

Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1820) is my 4th great-grandfather.  My 3rd great-grandfather is Zachariah Hildreth (1783-1857), son of Zachariah and his first wife, Elizabeth Keyes (1759-1793).  


Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Wednesday, March 25, 2015

What Family Tree Program Do You Use for Your Genealogy Research?

I am often asked by society colleagues, and email correspondents, "what family tree program do you use?"  

My response is usually "I use RootsMagic to manage my genealogy research, but I have and use Family Tree Maker and Legacy Family Tree for certain features (e.g., charts, reports, statistics), and I use online trees at Ancestry.com, MyHeritage, Geni.com, FamilySearch Family Tree, WikiTree, WeRelate and FindMyPast to be a cloud backup, to find research leads, and to provide cousin bait."  Whew!

I have often wondered which software programs and online trees are the most "popular" or most used.

The Weekly Genealogist email newsletter from the New England Historic Genealogical Society (NEHGS) asked the question last week, and this week they have tabulated the responses from 4,530 society members.  The results are:


Putting them in order:

*  50%:   Ancestry.com online family tree
*  47% :  Family Tree Maker software
*  18%:  FamilySearch.org online family tree
*  13%:  RootsMagic software
*  11%:  Legacy Family Tree software
*  7%:  Reunion software
*  7%:  Another software program not listed
*  6%:  Don't use an online tree or software program for research
*  6%:  Personal Ancestral File software
*  6%:  The Master Genealogist software
*  3%:  WikiTree online family tree
*  3%:  Geni.com online family tree
*  3%:  Findmypast online family tree
*  2%:  Ancestral Quest software
*  2%:  Family Tree Builder software
*  1%:  Gramps software
*  1%  Ancestris software
*  1%  Heredis software
*  1%  Mac Family Tree software

Responders could vote for any number of responses.

UPDATE:  I added the other two items to the list per Tony Proctor's suggestion.

It appears that they did not include MyHeritage, WeRelate and other online trees and Family Historian, Brothers Keeper, and other software programs on the list for some reason (perhaps they were overlooked), which is unfortunate.  They may be reflected in the 7% for another desktop or online tree program.

The high Family Tree Maker response (47%) may reflect both platforms - the old (Version 16 and before) and the new (Version 2008 to 2014).

I was surprised by the 18% vote for FamilySearch Family Tree because it is relatively new, and is not a GEDCOM upload (although some software programs can interact with it)..

I have not heard of Ancestris, but it has 1% of the responses.  Their home page is  http://www.ancestris.org/.  It is free to use, works on all platforms, has many language versions, etc.  I may have to look into this!

Have any readers seen a similar survey with as many respondents?

For my readers:  What desktop software programs and/or online family trees do you use for your genealogy research?  Please tell me in Comments.  It's OK to have more than one response.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/what-family-tree-program-do-you-use-for.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Interesting Comments and Follow-Up on Genea-Musings Posts

Here are some of the recent comments on Genea-Musings posts, and my responses if warranted:

1)  On Tuesday's Tip: FamilySearch Has Added New York City Records (posted 24 March 2015):

* Dara said excitedly: "Thank you, Randy Seaver!! I've finally found the death record for my GGG-grandmother, Jane Byrne, in Brooklyn, in 1901 and with it the names of my GGGG-grandparents, William and Hannah Daly - Happy Days! Can't wait to learn more about these record sets."

My comment:  I love getting comments like this!!!  It made my day.  Glad I can help, Dara, and I hope you find records of your 4th great-grandparents too!

*  Jacqi Stevens noted:  "Randy, this is excellent news! Guess I'll have to switch tracks on my ancestor chase, and set aside the pursuit of maternal colonials and take a look at what I can find on paternal immigrant NYC residents. I've got plenty of them that have me stymied."

My comment:  Good luck with your search, but please keep going on your maternal colonials too.

2)  On Sorting Out the Military Service of Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1820) (posted 23 March 2015):

*  Linda Stufflebean commented:  "Randy, Check the DAR.org website, GRS link to Ancestors. http://services.dar.org/Public/DAR_Research/search_adb/default.cfm

"Two Zachariahs come up, one 1728-1784, married Elizabeth Prescott. The second 1754-1829 married Elizabeth Keyes and he is called 2nd Lt. One member, nat. number 762184, has both men listed as her patriots. My nat. number begins with 658 and I joined in 1981. This lady likely joined in the late 1980s or early 1990s and had to provide strong documentation."

My comment:  Thank you for looking, Linda.  Can I see the application online to see the lines that were submitted?


*  Red ranted:  "FamilySearch family tree is to unprotected. It's too easily changed by users who don't even have contact information let alone supporting documents. It is too difficult to undo inaccurate information changed by hecklers. You spend countless hours being accurate and anyone can come along and change names and information to potty words. And if after more countless hours you fix it, you find they create a new free user and mess with it all over again... A good idea poorly monitored, and lacking the undo all changes made by a user tool. You can't even report the abuse of a tree. The act of creating the tree is to view and show the tree not spend endless hours with the maintenance of said tree..."

My comments:  I believe that anyone who uses FamilySearch Family Tree needs to have a username now, be logged in, and an email address on file.  The standard for every submitter is to supply Sources, Notes and to use Discussions to civilly resolve debates.  That said, I have encountered no real debates over my changes to person profiles and relationships.  

Please show me an example of "...anyone can come along and change names and information to potty words."  I'm sure FamilySearch would like to know about it, and discipline the user.  You can report the abuse.  

4)  On Best of the Genea-Blogs - 15 to 21 March 2015 (posted 22 March 2015):

*  mbm1311 said:  "There isn't a week that goes by where someone doesn't complain about the quality of an online tree. Would it be feasible to have an online tree that took a DAR like process to gain access? Let's say I have a documented tree and apply and I'm vetted. Then you come along with some duplicate research but some new branches then your new information gets vetted and attached.

"What do you think? I'm not saying the DAR type process would say that we know EVERYTHING about the tree we've certified but there is enough evidence to believe these people are related in the way presented."

My comment:  Something like this might work with a collaborative tree (our tree) like the FamilySearch Family Tree, WikiTree, or Geni, but I think that the effort would be too difficult to do it on separate family trees (yours, mine, his, hers, etc.).  That said, who in their right mind would volunteer to do this thankless task of double checking names, relationships and events, checking against sources, and putting a stamp of approval on the conclusions for a person, or a set of persons?

I think the better option is to have a family tree wiki, like FamilySearch Family Tree and WikiTree, and encourage, even require, submitters to add their sources, research notes, proof arguments, discussions, etc.  to support their conclusions.  FamilySearch thinks that, eventually, the sources will support collaborative conclusions and the tree will be pretty good.  Of course, there is still a lot of merging and cleanup to do on persons in Family Tree.  We'll see, but I think it has the potential to be really good.  WikiTree doesn't have the volume of profiles yet, but it doesn't have all of the problems that Family Tree has now.  Contributors are encouraged to provide sources, engage in discussions, etc. to support their conclusions.  Geni has a larger volume of profiles than WikiTree but fewer than Family Tree, and they use Curators to monitor changes and arbitrate discussions; they also "freeze" profiles of famous persons so that only selected persons can edit them based on source material.


*  XDmetalbabeDX said:  "familytreenow.com, findthebest.com and mooseroots.com are ran by the same identity thieves - I have filed a complaint with BBB, FTC and my state attorney general since they refuse to remove my personal information from their website. They do not have the right nor do they have my consent to post my personal information even if they say they get their information from other public databases which is a lie. My personal records are blocked, therefore their claims are all lies."

My comment:  From what they say, the records are all from publicly available records, many of which can be found for free in a simple Google search.  Have the BBB, FTC and attorney general responded to your complaint?  If it's valid, and enough people complain, they should investigate it.  

They haven't stolen your identity - you still have it, right?  But there is publicly available information on you, and me, and almost everybody that people can find if they look for it.  Did you block your personal data back in, say, 1970, before the Internet?  Are you in a court record, in a driver's license database, in a telephone book, etc.?  You cannot block personal data that's already in a database distributed to the world, often by a government agency, to a subscription or free website.

6)  It was difficult, but I refrained from posting the spam comment that I get at least once a week about spell-casters, losing your husband, and avoiding divorce.  

That's enough for today...it's an interesting mix of topics and commentary.  


Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver





Oo-Hoo, Linda and Edna -- Post 352 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

I'm posting old family photographs from my collection on Wednesdays, but they won't be wordless posts like others do - I simply am incapable of having a wordless post.

Here is one of the most precious (to me) images from my Seaver/Carringer family collection:




This is a fuzzy picture, but it's still precious because it's a happy occasion and a three-generation matrilineal line  photograph..  

This was taken in the bride's room at Chula Vista Presbyterian Church on 21 March 1970 just before my marriage to Linda.  Pictured here are, from the left:

*  Edna Catherine "Oo-hoo"  (McKnew) Schaffner (1884-1974), grandmother of Linda.
*  Linda Leland, soon to be Mrs. Seaver
*  Edna May (Schaffner) Leland (1913-1979), Linda's mother, and Oo-hoo's daughter.

Oo-hoo was so happy to come to our wedding.  Linda gave her a plane trip to San Diego for a Christmas present, and when Linda called to tell her that she was engaged and would be married on 21 March, Oo-hoo was overjoyed.  She could hardly wait.  What a trooper at age 86.  She didn't miss anything and enjoyed every minute of her stay.

Oo-hoo was Linda's special "angel" - they had a very special relationship from Linda's birth to Oo-hoo's death.  There's a story about how she got the name Oo-hoo that Linda tells - who has heard it?

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/oo-hoo-linda-and-edna-post-352-of-not.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Tuesday, March 24, 2015

Dear Randy: How Do I Add a FamilySearch Source to my Ancestry Member Tree?

Reader Greg asked that question recently in email, and I thought more readers might be interested in the question and the response.  I'm also happy that Greg wants to add sources to his Ancestry Member Tree!

1)  I looked for a record on FamilySearch.org that I didn't already have in my Ancestry Member Tree, and found a California Great Registers, 1866-1910 item for my wife's great-grandfather, Herman Schaffner (1851-1921):



Down at the bottom of the screen, I highlighted the source citation and hit Ctrl-C to Copy it, so that I can paste it into the Ancestry Member Tree fields.

The FamilySearch generated citation is:

"California Great Registers, 1866-1910," index,  FamilySearch   (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT6L-LQ1 : accessed 24 March 2015), Herman Schaffner, 22 Jul 1876; citing Voter Registration, 21 Silver, San Francisco, California, United States, county clerk offices, California; FHL microfilm 977,099.

2)  I went to my Ancestry Member Tree, and found Herman Schaffner's profile, and clicked on the "Facts and Sources" tab:


It opened on the "Facts & Events" list, so I clicked on the "Source Citations" tab:


On the screen above, I wanted to add a new source and citation, so I clicked on the "+ Add a Source Citation" tab.

3)  That opened the "Create Source Citation Information" screen, and I had to decide between "Select a source" (meaning a source previously entered into the tree) or "Create a new source."


I chose to "Create a new source" and form fields opened for the Source information (like Title, Author, Publisher, etc. as if it was a book):


I copied the first part of the copied source citation from FamilySearch into the Title field and left the rest of the fields blank.

Then I clicked on the "Back" arrow button on the screen above and added the rest of the copied source citation (from FamilySearch) into the "Detail" field on the "Create Source Citation Information" page as shown below:


I could have entered a transcription of the source content, but I didn't.

4)  Here is the finished citation on the "Source Citations" page for Herman Schaffner:


The citation as I entered it is shown in my Ancestry Member Tree as::

"California Great Registers, 1866-1910,"

1 Citation provides evidence for the following:
Detail:index, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/VT6L-LQ1 : accessed 24 March 2015), Herman Schaffner, 22 Jul 1876; citing Voter Registration, 21 Silver, San Francisco, California, United States, county clerk offices, California; FHL microfilm 977,099.
5)  After entering the source citation information, I went to the "Facts & Events" tab in my Ancestry tree and entered a "Residence" Fact, dated it 22 July 1876, and tried to find a way to attach the Source to the new Fact.  The tree system would not let me do this - I had to create a new Source citation and then attach the Source citation to the Fact information created before.  So there's a lesson here - enter the Fact first, then the source citation information.

6)  Rather than copying the FamilySearch citation directly into the Ancestry Member Tree fields, I could have typed (or copy/pasted) my preferred citation into the fields, but the result would not be significantly different.

7)  I really don't like the way Ancestry separates the master source and the citation detail, and inserts the word "Detail" into the citation.  

I'm also not a fan of FamilySearch's source citations that include the URL that directs the user to the record summary.  My preferred source citation, if I had done this in RootsMagic, would have been:

"California Great Registers, 1866-1910," indexed database, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 24 March 2015), Herman Schaffner, 22 July 1876; citing Voter Registration, 21 Silver, San Francisco, California, United States, county clerk offices, California; FHL microfilm 977,099.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/dear-randy-how-do-i-add-familysearch.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Tuesday's Tip: FamilySearch Has Added New York City Records

This week's Tuesday's Tip is:  Search for Births, Marriages and Deaths in New York City Records on FamilySearch.

FamilySearch added three new databases on 20 March 2015:

*  New York, New York City Births, 1846-1909; 2,795,113 indexed records, no images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  New York, New York City Marriage Records, 1866-1938; 1,740,063 indexed records, no images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  New York, New York City Municipal Deaths, 1795-1949; 6,192,370 indexed records, no images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

Typical record summaries are shown below:

1)  Birth record:


The "About this collection" Wiki page says:

"The collection consists of an index to birth records from New York City including Manhattan, Brooklyn, Bronx, Queens, and Richmond boroughs. The collection covers the years 1847 to 1909."

The birth records provide the parents names (including mother's maiden name in many cases).

2)  Marriage record:


The "About this collection" Wiki page says:

"The collection consists of marriage records from the five municipal boroughs of New York City and their predecessor counties. The dates covered by this collection are 1866 to 1938."


The marriage records provide the parents names in many cases.  

3)  Death record:


The "About this collection" Wiki page says:

"This collection will include records from 1795-1949. These records include an Index to New York municipal death records. The records come from the five-borough city. The time period varies by borough (county): New York City (Manhattan) 1795-1949, Bronx 1898-1948, Brooklyn 1847-1949, Queens 1898-1949, and Richmond 1898-1949."

The death records provide the parents names in only a few cases.

While there are no record images available on FamilySearch, a researcher could find the actual registers and/or certificates on FHL microfilm.  The specific microfilm number is listed on each record summary.

I know one thing i'll be doing this next week - mining these three databases for Seaver persons hoping to find dates, maiden names of spouses, names of fathers, and names of mothers.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/tuesdays-tip-familysearch-has-added-new.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Monday, March 23, 2015

Sorting Out the Military Service of Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1820)

I've spent part of the past week trying to find records of, and to sort out, the military service of Zachariah Hildreth (1754-1828), my 4th great-grandfather.  He was born in Westford, Massachusetts to Zachariah and Elizabeth (Precott) Hildreth, and resided in Townsend, Massachusetts after his marriage in 1777 to Elizabeth Keyes.  The elder Zachariah was born in 1728 and died in 1784 in Westford.

I started out with the entries in the book, Massachusetts, Secretary of the Commonwealth, Massachusetts Soldiers and Sailors of the Revolutionary War (Boston, Mass. : Wright & Potter Pritning, 1896-1908):


There are three entries for the name, it may be that they refer to only one person, or two persons, or three persons with the same name.

The first listing for Zachariah Hildreth of Boston says he mustered in June 1777 in Col. Henry Jackson's regiment.  There was a Zachariah Hildreth who married Margaret Bard in 1773 in Boston.
There are Revolutionary War Rolls and other records for a Sergeant Zachariah Hildreth in Colonel Henry Jackson's Regiment on Ancestry.com and Fold3.

 I think the first listing refers to this specific Zachariah Hildreth, who is not closely related to the Zachariahs of Westford and Townsend.

The second listing for Zachariah Hildreth calls him a 2d Lieutenant and notes he was in Captain Zachariah Wright's 2nd Westford company in the 6th Regiment.  Note the name Jonathan Reed in this entry.  This is obviously a company from Westford.  My elder Zachariah Hildreth would be age 48 in 1776, while my younger Zachariah Hildreth would be age 22.  I think that this second listing is probably my elder Zachariah.

The third listing is for Zachariah Hildreth and calls him a Corporal, and he joined in 1778 in Col. Jonathan Reed's regiment.  I think this is probably my younger Zachariah Hildreth who settled in Townsend by 1778 (when his first child was recorded there).

The complications arise when I review the SAR Applications on Ancestry.com.  There are two SAR applications (and two for DAR also, but I can't see them) for a Zachariah Hildreth.  One is for Samuel Hildreth Emerson:


This application attributes the Lieutenant of Westford to my elder Zachariah Hildreth.  I think this is probably correct, but I haven't found any military records to support it..

The second application is for George Henry Woolley:


This application attributes the 2nd Lieutenant of Westford as my younger Zachariah Hildreth who settled in Townsend.  I think that this is not correct, but I can't find records to support it.

Then there is the biography of Milo Hildreth in the book Biographical Encyclopaedia of Massachusetts of the Nineteenth Century, that states:

..."Zachariah Hildreth [of Townsend] was a farmer, a cooper, and a military man, who was  elected Captain of the militia in 1790, and held that office until 1796."

This doesn't mention his rank or service during the Revolutionary War, and I would think that it would.

I did find one record in the Revolutionary War Pension Records for John Sherwin of Townsend where Zachariah Hildreth was listed as one of the men who served in 1778 as a guard in Cambridge, which matches the description of Corporal Zachariah Hildreth's service to some extent.

My hypothesis is as above as to each Zachariah Hildreth, but I'm not sure that I've nailed all three of these Zachariah's down yet since I don't seem to have any records for the Westford and Townsend men.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/sorting-out-military-service-of.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


New or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - March 16 to 22, 2015

I'm trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list).  As of 22 March 2015, there were 1,944 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 4 from last week).



Here are the new or updated record collections for the past week:

*  California, San Francisco Passenger Lists, 1893-1953; 1,167,589 indexed records with images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  United Kingdom, World War I Service Records, 1914-1920; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  Ohio, County Marriages, 1789-2013; 4,536,489 indexed records with images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  North Dakota, Manifests of Immigrant Arrivals, 1910-1952; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  California, San Diego, Airplane Passenger and Crew Lists, 1929-1954; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  Newfoundland Census, 1921; 218,865 indexed records with images, added or updated 20 Mar 2015

*  South Africa, Free State Dutch Reformed Church Records, 1848-1956; 46,522 indexed records with images, added or updated 19 Mar 2015

*  Montana, Beaverhead County Records, 1862-2009; 12,073 indexed records with images, added or updated 19 Mar 2015

*  Canada Census, 1911; 7,246,159 indexed records, no images, added or updated 19 Mar 2015

*  South Carolina, Confederate Home Records, 1909-1958; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 18 Mar 2015

*  New York, Northern Arrival Manifests, 1902-1956; 160,650 indexed records with images, added or updated 18 Mar 2015

*  Minnesota, Baudette, Warroad, and International Falls Passenger Lists, 1910-1923; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 18 Mar 2015

*  Florida, Key West Passenger Lists, 1898-1945; 223,879 indexed records with images, added or updated 18 Mar 2015


*  United States, Freedmen's Branch Records, 1872-1878; Browse Images only, no index, added or updated 17 Mar 2015

Unfortunately, it is difficult to tell which collections are brand new and which ones are updated.  The asterisk they use is for "Recently added or updated."  I am particularly interested in new collections, for the obvious reasons.

In order to select a specific collection, go to 
https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner.

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/new-or-updated-record-collections-at.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Amanuensis Monday - Post 260: 1913 Probate Record of James Richmond of Putnam, Connecticut - Part 3

Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The subject today is the third (and last) part of the 1912 Probate Record of James Richmond (1821-1912) of Putnam, Connecticut:





The transcription of the record is (all handwritten):

[page 568, middle of page]

To the Probate Court for the District of Putnam
Estate of James Richmond late of Putnam in said district
deceased.
Know all men by these Presents:
That, whereas the undersigned
Thomas Richmond, Louisa Richmond, Charles E. Richmond,
James Richmond, Emma Fitts, Elizabeth A. Prentice, John H.
Richmond are all the persons interested, as heirs-at-law and
next of kin and distributees in the Estate of said James
Richmond deceased who left certain real estate to be divided
among them, in accordance with the laws of this State for the
distribution of intestate estates, and whereas, after the payment
of all claims against the estate of said James Richmond and
the expense of settlement, there remains the property real
hereinafter described.

Now, therefore, know ye that we, the said Thomas Richmond,
Louisa Richmond, Charles E. Richmond, James Richmond, Emma Fitts,
Elizabeth A. Prentice, John H. Richmond, all being legally capable
to act, do hereby mutually agree to divide, apportion and
distribute the said property among ourselves in the manner
following:
Said John H. Richmond shall take and have the following
described Real estate to wit:

One certain tract of land with a dwelling house and all
the buildings thereon standing situated in said Putnam
containing about eight acres more or less and is the same
land and buildings which Nathaniel Battey late of Putnam
deceased, purchased by deed from Waterman's Grant, dated

[page 569]

19th day of November 1869 and duly recorded, and also by deed
from Henry R. Dexter dated the 18th day of April 1869 and
duly accorded reference is had to said deeds and the records
for am ore particular description of the boundaries etc.
the same premises conveyed to Adah Battey by Quit Claims
deed from the heirs of Nathaniel Battey by deed dated the
29th of March 1875 and duly recorded reference is had thereto,
and also Adah Battey derived title to the same by the last
will and testament of said Nathaniel Battey duly probated
reference is had to the same.

The same being subject to two mortgages one for $1000 to Wm.
Rich and one for $300 to Elizabeth A. Prentice.

To Have and to Hold to each of the parties hereto, and his or her
heirs and assigns forever, the property real and personal herein before
assigned to said parties respectively so that neither of us, nor any
one claiming under either of us, shall hereafter have any claims
right or title, in or to the premises or property or any part hereof
herein before assigned to the others, but each of us is from the
premises as assigned to the others, forever barred and secluded.

In Witness Whereof, we have hereunto set our hands and
seals this day of Oct in the year of our Lord nineteen hundred
and thirteen.

Thomas Richmond L.S.
James Richmond L.S.
Louisa Richmond L. S.
Elizabeth A. Prentice
Emma Fitts
John Richmond
Charles E. Richmond
Witnesses
Jorie A. Sullivan
Clinton W. Cowles

Personally appeared Thomas Richmond, Louisa Richmond,
Elizabeth A. Prentice, Emma Fitts, John Richmond, Signers and sealers
of the foregoing instrument and acknowledged the same to be their
free act and deed before me.
Seal Attest Edward G. Wright Judge of Probate

State of Connecticut }
County of Hartford } ss. Manchester Oct 17th A.D. 1913
Personally appeared Charles E. Richmond
Signer and Sealer of the foregoing Instrument, and acknow-
ledged the same to be his free act and deed before me.
Clinton W. Cowles, Notary Public Seal

State of Connecticut }
County of Fairfield } Bridgeport Oct. 18th 1913

[page 570]

Personally appeared James Richmond one of the signers or the foregoing
instrument and acknowledged the same to be his free act and deed
before me. George E. Curtis Notary Public for State of Connecticut
Seal.

The above and foregoing is a true copy of the Mutual Distribution of
said estate. Attest Edward G. Wright Judge

The source citation for this document is:

Putnam District, Connecticut, Probate Records, 1856-1920, Volume 11, Pages 568-570, Distribution of  James Richmond real estate; FHL microfilm US/CAN 1,376,328.

In this record, the heirs of James Richmond distributed the 80 acres of real estate to John H. Rivhmond, subject to him paying the two mortgages.  No description of the land was included, except that it was first awarded in Waterman's Grants, sold to Nathaniel Battey by deed in 1869, and passed to his widow Adah Battey in 1875 by deeds and heirship.  No date of acquisition of the land by James Richmond is mentioned and no deed is referenced for some reason.

Information I have about this family is that this land was a dairy farm James Richmond in the western part of Putnam, Connecticut.  John H. Richmond and his wife, and John's sister, Louisa, resided on the dairy farm at the time of the death of James Richmond's death.  Perhaps the other children of James Richmond had received their portions by gift or deed in earlier years.  All but one (Louisa) had married and had families at the time of the death of their father.  

James Richmond (1821-1912) is my second great-grandfather, and the father of my great-grandfather, Thomas Richmond (1848-1917).  

I found this probate record on microfilm at the Family History Library in Salt Lake City on 11 February 2015.

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Sunday, March 22, 2015

Added or Updated Databases at Ancestry.com - Week of March 15-21, 2015

The following databases were added or updated on Ancestry.com during the period from 15 to 21 March 2015 (Note: not all new or updated databases are indexed or have images).



*  Web: Bisbee, Arizona, Evergreen Cemetery Index, 1884-2007; indexed records, no images, ADDED 3/18/2015

*  Kansas State Census Collection, 1855-1925; indexed records and record images, UPDATED 3/18/2015

*  UK, Electrical Engineer WWI and WWII Rolls of Honour, 1924, 1949; indexed records and record images, ADDed 3/17/2015


*  Pennsylvania, Birth Records, 1906-1908; indexed records and record images, ADDed 3/16/2015

The recently added or updated page on Ancestry.com is  at  http://www.ancestry.com/cs/reccol/default.

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at  http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  There are 32,618 databases available as of 21 March, an increase of 3 over last week. 

The URL for this post is:   
http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/added-or-updated-databases-at_22.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver



Best of the Genea-Blogs - 15 to 21 March 2015

Hundreds of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.


My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.

Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


*  HeritageQuest From ProQuest Gets Remodel and Upgrades Thanks to Partnership with Ancestry.com by the writer of the Gone Researching blog.  Nice review of the recamped website, including helpful search engine commentary.

*  Plastic Paddy by Jacqi Stevens on A Family Tapestry blog.  Jacqi discusses being American and yet of Irish descent.

*  Tuesday's Tip: Researching Your Deaf Ancestors in U.S. Federal Censuses by Miriam J. Robbins on the Ancestories: The Stories of My Ancestors blog.  Miriam takes us through U.S. census records from 1830 to 1910 with indicators for deaf persons.

*  Ancestry.com did Not Buy HeritageQuest and Librarians Express Concern Over HeritageQuest Changes by the writer of The Ancestry Insider blog.  Mr. AI provides Q&A  and comments about the HeritageQuestOnline changes.

* "A Plot of the Land of George Lanphear" by Diane Boumenot on the One Rhode Island Family blog.  Diane analyzes a 1727 map of land in Westerly, R.I. to try to determine who the parents of her Daniel Lanphear are.

*  Eleven Things I Would Do Differently and A Dozen Things I Got Right by Roberta J. Estes on the DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy blog.  Good ones!

*  Michigan Death Certificate Images Released -- 1921-1939 and Day Two of the Michigan Death Certificates Jouney - Now What? by Diane Gould Hall on the Michigan Family Trails blog.  diane organized her search using her software - well done!

*  Using Your DNA Test Results: The Basics for Genealogists by Kitty Cooper on Kitty Cooper's Blog.  Kitty summarizes her close DNA matches in one beautiful chromosome browser chart, and has advice for other researchers.

*  HSP:  Research Outside the Box by Judy G. Russell on The Legal Genealogist blog.  Judy visits the Historical Society of Pennsylvania and sees some treasures.

*  What's Wrong With Genealogy Today? by Kenneth R. Marks on The Ancestor Hunt blog.  Ken answers the question, do you agree?

*  March/April Lecture Schedule by Jill Morelli on the Genealogy Certification: My Personal Journal blog.  Jill describes steps she has taken to become a successful speaker on genealogy subjects.

*  Hierarchies Help Source Organisation, Analysis and Citation by Sue Adams on the Family Folklore Blog.  Sue identifies source materials about her life using a Mind Map.  Interesting!

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Recommended Reads by Linda Stufflebean on the Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog.

*  GAGs - GeniAus Gems - 20 March 2015 by Jill Ball on the GeniAus blog.

*  Follow Friday ~ Fab  Finds for March 20, 2015 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

*  Friday Finds - 03/20/15 by Julie Cahill Tarr on Julie's Genealogy & History Hub blog.

*  Best Bytes for the Week of 20 March 2015 by Elizabeth O'Neal on the Little Bytes of Life blog.

*  This Week's Creme de la Creme -- March 21, 2015 by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

*  Friday Finds and Follows: 20 March 2015 (A Day Late!) by Miriam J. Robbins on the Ancestories: The Stories of My Ancestors blog.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.

Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I am currently reading posts from over 1560 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


The URL for this post is:   
http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/03/best-of-genea-blogs-15-to-21-march-2015.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver