Friday, August 18, 2017

New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday, 18 August 2017

I received this information today from Findmypast:

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New Records Available to Search This Findmypast Friday

There are over 7.1 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

Muster Rolls of The Marine Corps

Explore over 1.7 million muster rolls records from the United States Marine Corps spanning the late 1700s up to the end of the nineteenth century. The rolls record the details of men who were serving with the Corps and were chronologically arranged by month and then ordered by detachment or unit. The exception to this is the records pertaining to World War I when they were sorted in two subseries: by posts and stations and by mobile units.

As seen in the column headings on the images of the original records, muster rolls generally include the space to record the following details: name, station, rank, enlistment date, re-enlistment date, desertion or apprehension date, and offence and court-martial sentence.

Buckinghamshire Baptism Index

Search over 870,000 transcripts created from original records held at the Buckinghamshire Archives. Buckinghamshire is located in South East England and is one of the Home Counties.

Baptism records can be a particularly powerful resource for family historians as they reveal the names of your ancestor's parents, information that allows you to jump back a generation and expand your family tree. You will also discover your ancestor's birthplace, the date of the baptism, their father's occupation and residence.

Buckinghamshire Banns Index

The Buckinghamshire Banns Index contains over 101,000 records created from original parish registers and bishop's transcripts held by the Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies. Banns are a public announcement of a couple's intention to marry. Banns are performed three times, on three separate Sundays, in the three months before the couple's wedding day. The existence of a banns record does not confirm that a marriage took place so search the Buckinghamshire Marriage index if you wish to confirm the marriage.

Each transcript will reveal the name of your ancestor's intended spouse, the couple's residence, the dates the announcements were read and their intended date of marriage.

Buckinghamshire Marriage Index

Explore more than 485,000 transcripts to find out whether your ancestors were married in a Buckinghamshire parish church. From 1754, members of other denominations were required to register their marriage through the Church of England. Therefore, if your ancestor was a Methodist or Catholic, it is possible you may find their marriage in this index. The index was created from original records found in the Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies. An archive reference on the transcripts will allow you to locate the original image.

Each transcript will reveal the couple's birth years, marital status, occupation, date of marriage, place of marriage, residence, occupation, father's names, father's occupations and the names of any witnesses.

Buckinghamshire Burial Index

Were your ancestors buried in Buckinghamshire? Search over 662,000 transcripts created from original parish registers and bishop's transcripts held at the Buckinghamshire Archives to find out.

Each record will reveal your ancestor's birth year, age at death, burial date and residence. An archive reference is also included, allowing you to locate a copy of the original document.

Ireland Calendars of Wills & Administrations 1858-1920

Search over 1 million Wills & Administration records to learn more about your Irish ancestor's will and estate. Ireland began publishing an annual will calendar beginning in 1858. This calendar typically contained a summary of the will and probate information including the name of the deceased, their address, occupation, beneficiaries, date of death and value of their estate.

The Calendars are an excellent way of uncovering details of principal family relationships and assets of which the person died possessed.

British Newspapers

Over 2.3 million new articles and 7 brand new titles have been added to our collection of historic newspapers this month. New titles now available to search include:

  • Tenby Observer
  • Brechin Herald
  • Milngavie and Bearsden Herald
  • Alcester Chronicle
  • Abergavenny Chronicle
  • Ripley and Heanor News and Ilkeston Division Free Press
  • Eastern Daily Press and the Colchester Gazette

Local newspapers include more than just announcements of births, marriages, and deaths. Local articles include visitors to and from town, legal detailing the settling of estates and land sales, and advertisements.

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Disclosure:  I receive a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, which I appreciate.  However, this does not affect my objectivity in reporting on this website.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 188: #267 Susanna (Wood) Reed (1724-1780) of Woburn and Marlborough, Massachusetts

Susanna (Wood) Reed (1724-1780) is #267 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandmother, who married #266 Nathan Reed (1719-1802) in 1743 in Boston, Massachusetts.


I am descended through:

*  their daughter, #133 Susanna Reed (1745-1833) who married #132 Simon Gates (1739-1803) in 1766.
*  their son #66 Nathan Gates (1767-1830)  who married #67 Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855)  in 1790.
*  their daughter #33 Abigail Gates (1797-1867) who married  #32 Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825) in 1817.
*  their son #16 Isaac Seaver (1823-1901) who married #17 Lucretia Townsend Smith (1828-1884) in 1851.
*  their son #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) who married #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) who married #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
   
*   Name:                    Susanna Wood[1–4]
*  Alternate Name:     Susanna Reed[5–7]  

*  Sex:                         Female
 
*  Father:                    Josiah Wood (1687-1753)
*  Mother:                  Ruth Walker (1692-1752)    
 
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
 
*  Birth:                     6 March 1724, Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[1]   
*  Deed:                     11 March 1744 (age 20), Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[5]
*  Death:                    16 October 1780 (age 56), Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[6–7]    
*  Burial:                    after 16 October 1780 (after age 56), Spring Hill Cemetery, Marlborough, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[6]   
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   
  
*  Spouse 1:               Nathan Reed (1718-1802)   
*  Marriage 1:            9 February 1742/3 (age 18), Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States[2–4]   
*  Child 1:                 Nathan Reed (1744-    )   
*  Child 2:                 Susanna Reed (1745-1833)   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

Susanna Wood was born 6 March 1724 in Woburn, Massachusetts, the seventh child and second daughter of Josiah and Ruth (Walker) Wood of Woburn[1].

She married Nathan Reed on 9 February 1742/3 in Trinity Church in Boston, Massachusetts[2-4].  Susanna and Nathan had only two children, Nathan and Susanna, born in 1744 and 1745.

Susanna's father, Josiah Wood, was declared non compos mentis in 1736.  On 11 March 1744, Ruth Wood (the wife and guardian of her husband, Josiah Wood), John Wood, Nathan and Susanna Reed, all of Woburn, Benjamin and Ruth Nutting of Medford, and Joseph Wood of Lunenberg, deeded the whole estate, both personal and real, of Josiah and Ruth Wood to Edward Wood and Solomon Wood, both of Woburn, for £315[5].  Edward and Solomon Wood were brothers of Susanna (Wood) Reed.

The Nathan Reed family resided in Woburn until about 1747 when Nathan Reed bought land in Marlborough, Massachusetts.

Susanna (Wood) Reed died 16 October 1780 in Marlborough[7].  She is buried in Spring Hill Cemetery in Marlborough[6].  The gravestone inscription says:

Susanna Reed
wife of
Mr. Nathan Reed
died Oct 16 1780
in the 57th year
of her age.

5)  SOURCES  

1. Edward F. Johnson,  Woburn Records of Births, Marriages and Deaths [5 Volumes], (Woburn, Mass.: The News Print, 1893), Births, page 280, Susanna Wood entry.

2. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), Boston > Church Marriages, 1751-1761, image 29 of 61, Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood marriage entry, 1742.

3. “Boston Church Records,” online database. American Ancestors (http://www.AmericanAncestors.org), citing The Records of the Churches of Boston. CD_ROM. Boston, Mass.: New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002, Trinity Church, page 168, Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood entry.

4. Edward W McGlenen, Boston Marriages from 1700 to 1809 (Baltimore, Md. : Genealogical Publishing Company, 1977), page 342, Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood entry.

5. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org :, Middlesex County, Volume 46, page 319, Nathan and Susanna Reed et al to Edward and Solomon Wood, 11 March 1744, recorded 6 July 1747.

6. Jim Tipton, indexed database, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com), Spring Hill Cemetery, Marlborough, Mass., Susanna Reed memorial #33408874.

7. Franklin P. Rice (editor), Vital Records of Marlborough, Massachusetts, to the End of the Year 1849 (Boston, Mass. : Franklin P. Rice ,1908), Deaths, page 383, entry for Mrs. Susanna Reed, wife of Nathan, in 57th year.

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NOTE:  Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2017 to 208 Ancestors in 208 Weeks.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, August 17, 2017

Using WikiTree to Find Relationships to Famous Persons

I received an email today from my cousin Laura - we share my great-grandparents, Thomas and Julia (White) Richmond.  One of her descendants is doing a school project on famous persons, and has Ulysses S. Grant, the 18th President of the United States.

I found the easiest way to find the relationship information is to use any of the connected universal family trees - either WikiTree (free), FamilySearch Family Tree (free), or Geni ($$).  However, in order to use any of these services, the user needs to have a profile in the tree.  The target famous person needs to be in the tree also.

Here's how I used WikiTree to do this particular task:

On the WikiTree home page (www.wikitree.com), you can click on the "Find" link at the top right of the screen and then click on the "Relationships" link in the dropdown menu:


Before I clicked on "Relationships," I used the search box outlined in green on the screen above to find the Tree ID for Ulysses Grant.


There were 17 matches, and the 18th President was #16 on the list.  His Tree ID is Grant-468.  I knew that mine was Seaver-15.

Knowing the two Tree IDs, I then clicked on the "Relationships" link and entered the two Tree ID's into the boxes in the Relationship Finder:


When I clicked on the "Find Relationship" button, the program found a common ancestor and calculated my relatioohip to Ulysses S. Grant:


We are 7th cousins 3 times removed.  The closest common ancestors are Stephen and Tryphosa (Lee) Tracy, my 9th great-grandparents.

WikiTree also provides relationships to the famous person with other common ancestors.  At the bottom of the relationship screen above, you can click on the down arrow in the "Explore More" area and see the other common ancestors:


Mayflower passenger Richard Warren and his wife Elizabeth Walker are also common ancestors for me and Grant.

WikiTree is very useful for finding common ancestor relationships.  As always, the tree is only as good as the contributors make it.  My judgment is that WikiTree is the most accurate of the connected universal family trees, but it is also the smallest.  There are almost 15 million profiles in WikiTree.  It would be great if there were millions more.

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Seavers in the News - Elizabeth Seaver's 1851 Marriage

It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from The Brooklyn [N.Y.] Daily Eagle newspaper dated 22 January 1851:



The transcription of this record is:

"MARRIED
At Washington, D.C., Hon. GEORGE G. KING, member of the House of Representatives from Rhode Island, to Miss ELIZABETH SEAVER."

The source citation for this record is:

"Married," marriage announcement, The Brooklyn [N.Y.] Daily Eagle, 22 January 1851, page 2, column 5, George G. King and Elizabeth Seaver marriage; digital image, Newspapers.com (http://newspapers.com : accessed 9 August 2017).

Reader Barbara sent this marriage notice to me and it sent me scurrying to figure out who Miss Elizabeth Seaver was.  I did not have a candidate for a person by that name who resided in Washington, D.C. at that time in my RootsMagic file.  So I went searching, and found an 1850 U.S. census record for Johnathan Seaver (age 55 born in MA) with a Johnathan Seaver (age 22 born in DC) and an Elizabeth Seaver (aged 22 born in DC), in Washington, D.C.  I easily found Jonathan Seaver (1793-1864) who married Mary G. Plummer on 5 June 1823 in Washington, D.C.  

Then I found a record that named the three children of Jonathan and Mary (Plummer) Seaver on Ancestry.com in the "U.S. Quaker Meeting Records, 1681-1935" for Alexandria, Virginia:


This record identifies three children of Jonathan Seaver dated 1845, which includes Elizabeth Seaver, "died 10th mo. 22 d 1853," who joined the church with Jonathan in 1845.   

Is that the right Elizabeth Seaver?  My next challenge was to try to find a death record for Elizabeth (Seaver) King - and there is one on Find A Grave with a death date of 22 October 1853, buried in Island Cemetery in Newport, Rhode Island:


There is a Find A Grave memorial for George Gordon King also, he died 17 July 1870, and is buried in Island Cemetery in Newport, Rhode Island also.  There is also a Find A Grave memorial for the baby daughter of George and Elizabeth (Seaver) King - named Elizabeth Seaver King (1852-1853).  

There is also another Find A Grave memorial for Elizabeth C. King, who died 26 October 1853, in Congressional Cemetery in Washington, D.C. 

My judgment is that all of these records refer to Elizabeth C. (Seaver) King (1826-1853) who married George Gordon King, a member of Congress from Rhode Island, before 22 January 1851 in Washington, D.C.   

Unfortunately, all of the known children of Jonathan Seaver died before 1853, leaving no living issue.

None of these children of Jonathan Seaver were in the FamilySearch Family Tree before this exercise, and now they are.

My thanks to Barbara for sending the marriage notice to me.  She noted in her email that:

"The Brooklyn Public Library makes the Brooklyn Daily Eagle free to everyone at  https://bklyn.newspapers.com you don't need a Newspapers.com subscription to read it."

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


1742/3 Marriage Record for Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood in Boston, Mass. - Post 378 of Treasure Chest Thursday

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the  1742/3 marriage record of Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood in Boston, Massachusetts: 

The Reed/Wood marriage is on the right-hand page, fifth up from the bottom:


The transcription is (the page heading says "From the records of Trinity Church"):

Nathan Reed " [&] Susanna Wood " [by] same [Rev. Addington Davenport]   Feb^y 9 " [1742]

The source citation for this record is:

"Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 16 August 2017), Boston > "Church Marriages, 1751-1761," Trinity Church (image 29 of 61), Nathan Reed and Susanna Wood marriage entry, 1742.

This marriage record is for Nathan Reed (1719-1802) of Woburn and Susanna Wood (1724-1780) of Woburn, solemnized at the Trinity Church in Boston, Massachusetts.  

The correct date is 9 February 1742/3, although the entry says 1742;  the last six entries on the right-hand page are in date order after November 9, 1742 and are surely 1742/3 due to the 1752 change in calendar dates.  Note: I don't add 9 days to the pre-1752 dates in order to bring it up to the current calendar relationships.

Since this is a transcription in a Boston record book of the original record in the church record book, it is a Derivative source.  There are six entries in this Massachusetts town and vital records collection on Ancestry for this marriage, and they are all derivative sources and they all agree.  

Nathan and Susanna (Wood) Reed are my 6th great-grandparents, through their daughter Susanna Reed (1745-1833), who married Simon Gates (1739-1803) in 1766 in Marlborough, Massachusetts and resided in Gardner, Mass..

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Wednesday, August 16, 2017

FamilySearch Digital Microfilm Update

During this week's Mondays With Myrt Hangout on Air, Diane Loosle, the Director of the Family History Library in Salt Lake City, discussed the current status of the digitization of FHL microfilms.  Some of my takeaways:

*  Digitization is restricted by the contractual agreements that the FHL has with the record repositories.  Some contracts do not permit digitizing, others do but restrict access to the FHL or FSLs, and others permit digital records to be presented on online websites such as FamilySearch.

*  About 25% of the digitized collections will be available only at the Family History Library or local FamilySearch Libraries or Centers because of contractual requirements.

*  They probably will not digitize duplicate record sets - some records are on more than one microfilm set, and they will pick one.

*  Digitization is prioritized by the microfilms ordered in the last five years.  These should be digitized by 2020.

*  Less than 11% of the FHL digital microfilm collection is indexed, so it is important that users learn how to browse the record collections.

*  Urgent requests can be made - stay tuned after 1 September for more information.

*  They are digitizing about 1,000 films a day.  That's amazing, but they have only about 1200 days before the end of 2020, right?

*  They will keep the existing microfilm at the Family History Library. The permanent rental at local FSLs or FSCs can be retained by the local management if desired.

*  Many record sets already digitized are on the FamilySearch Record Collection List.  However, there are many record sets partially digitized that are not on the list.

*  Users can check the status of a specific record set or microfilm by checking in the FamilySearch Catalog.

I will work through the FamilySearch Catalog search process below, in case readers want to review and use the process:

1)  On the FamilySearch Catalog page, I entered "Hilperton" in the search field and selected "England, Wiltshire, Hilperton" from the dropdown menu:


2)  I clicked on the blue "Search" button on the screen above, and saw the list of record types for Hilperton:


3)  When I click on any of the items on the list above, the list expands to show all record sets for that record type.  I clicked on the "England, Wiltshire, Hilperton - Church records (3)" item and saw the three record sets for that record type:

4)  I wanted to see the "Bishop's transcripts for Hilperton, 1622-1880."  I clicked on it, and after signing into FamilySearch, saw the information about the specific record set:


Down at the bottom of the screen above is the Film Notes, including the film number (in this case Film 1279404 items 11-16).  If I was at the FHL, I would go find that film, put it on the microfilm reader, and crank until I found Item 11 for the Hilperton records.

On the far right of the Film Notes information on the screen above, there are two icons under "Format."  The magnifying glass icon is for "Search the Index."  The second icon may be a "film roll" icon or a "camera" icon.  If it's a "film roll" icon, then you have to view the microfilm at the FHL (after 1 September).  If it's a "camera" icon, then it is digitized and available online.

5)  When I click on the "Camera" icon, the set of digitized images opens, as shown below:


There are 2324 images in this "digital microfilm" - but the popup window tells me I have to go to a Family History Center to review it.  Drat - but at least I don't have to travel to SLC, I can see this record set in my local FamilySearch Center on their computer systems and save page images to my flash drive..

I haven't checked for the digitizing status of my "target" microfilms - the ones I have on my "to-do" list when I go each year to the Family History Library.  I will go through my to-do list and summarize the "target" record sets I'm interested in in another post.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/08/familysearch-digital-microfilm-update.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Book Review: "Death Finds A Way: A Janie Riley Mystery" by Lorine McGinnis Schulze

Geneablogger and friend Lorine McGinnis Schulze has written a genealogy mystery book for all of us to enjoy.


The back cover for Death Finds A Way: A Janie Riley Mystery describes it as:
"Janie Riley is an avid genealogist with a habit of stumbling on to dead bodies. With her husband Steven, Janie heads to Salt Lake City Utah to track down her elusive fourth great-grandmother. But her search into the past leads her to more than she bargained for. Her discovery of a dark secret brings her closer to danger. Can she solve the mysteries of the past and the present, and untangle a web of lies before disaster strikes?"
Well, yes, she can and does, and quite well.  The plot seems simple at first, but easily grows more complex, and disaster strikes.  There are mysterious men in the Family History Library, and Janie's neighbor at the microfilm machines has problems with her husband and her client research.  Janie can't help herself and commiserates with her FHL neighbor and gets sucked into the ongoing drama.  I'm not sure that Janie ever found what she was looking for at the FHL, but I know that she found herself in the middle of a lot of trouble.  I won't spoil any of the surprises in this book.  

The book is necessarily set in Salt Lake City, and there are mentions of the hotels and restaurants that I know and have heard about.  The FHL is depicted accurately, although the description may be a bit dated because of the recent modifications in the past year.  But that's OK - it's only a setting that enables the plot to twist in mysterious ways.  

 Janie's husband, Steven, is a prince in my humble opinion, but helpless to keep his wife from getting involved.  I also read things about male-female relationships and attitudes that I was surprised by - Lorine has a great imagination, and/or a lot of experiences.

I found myself wondering if I would do some of the actions that Janie took and I doubt that I would.  I try to avoid trouble and getting involved in the business of other people, especially in a library quiet zone and under a research deadline.  

All in all, this was an enjoyable read, with enough genealogy research mixed into the drama to hold my interest to the end.  I was happy to see that Janie used several of my favorite research record types to solve the genealogy puzzle part of the story.  

If you like mysteries (and what genealogist doesn't?), I recommend this book.

Death Finds A Way: A Janie Riley Mystery is available on Amazon in paperback and Kindle.  

Disclosure:  I was gifted a paperbook version of the book by the author and committed to writing a review on my blog.  


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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Zoo Fun in May 2013 - Post 477 of (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

We had the two granddaughters (ages 5 and 8 at the time) in May 2013 for a weekend, and we visited the San Diego Zoo in Balboa Park.  Here are some photos from our visit:

1)  On the back of a big metal lion:


2)  At the orangutan exhibit:


3)  On the rocks:


4)  On the back of a metal rhino:


The girls love the zoo, but it has gotten difficult to walk around for the grandparents.

More wild zoo photos next week.

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Tuesday, August 15, 2017

Genealogy News Bytes - 15 August 2017


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last four days include:

1)  News Bytes:


*  Free UK Genealogy has launched FreeCEN2, their new free United Kingdom census website.

*  Announcing an October 2018 Genealogy Research Trip to Dublin or Belfast, Ireland

*  Hotel Reservations Now Open for the National Genealogical Society’s 2018 Family History Conference

2)  Record Databases:

*  
Added or Updated Ancestry.com Databases - Week of 6 to 12 August 2017

*  Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 6 to 12 August 2017

*  Florida and Puerto Rico to Add 100,000 Historical Newspaper Pages to Chronicling America

*  West Virginia to Add 100,000 Historical Newspaper Pages to Chronicling America

*  Connecticut to Add 100,000 Historical Newspaper Pages to Chronicling America

3)  Genealogy Education:

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar, Tuesday, 15 August, 5 p.m. PDT:  "Analyzing Probate Records of Slaveholders to Identify Enslaved Ancestors," by LaBrenda Garrett-Nelson.

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar, Wednesday, 16 August 2017, 11 a.m. PDT:  "Finding Your Ancestors in German Directories,: by Luana Darby

*  Upcoming SCGS Webinar, Wednesday, 16 August 2017, 6 p.m. PDT:  "Ports of Entry," by Kim von Aspern-Parker.

*  Archived Tree Webinar:  "Using Pictures with Legacy Family Tree," by Geoff Rasmussen

*  Ancestral Findings YouTube Channel:  AF-139: What is a GEDCOM?

*  Ancestry YouTube Channel:  Dealing With Errors in Online Family Trees

*  BYU Family History Library YouTube Channel:  New Developments in the Family History Guide, by Bob Taylor

*  *  BYU Family History Library YouTube Channel:  Where Are the Digitized Records on FamilySearch.org, by James Tanner

*  DearMYRTLE's YouTube Channel:  Mondays With Myrt - 14 August 2017

*  DearMYRTLE's YouTube Channel:  Genealogy Game Night - August 2017

*  The In-Depth Genealogist YouTube Channel:  Chit Chat Live: Interview with Mary Kircher Roddy

*  Genealogy Journey's Podcast #35: Voting and the 19th Amendment

4)  Genealogy Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Tuesday August 15, 2017


*  All Census Records at MyHeritage Are FREE August 14-20

5)  Neat Stuff:

*  
Here Are The Oldest Photos Ever Taken In The United States And They Are Incredible

*  How Each of the 50 U.S. States Got Their Name

*  Spread of Christianity From 300 to 800 A.D.

Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 11 August 2017?

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Tombstone Tuesday - Cornelius Feather (1777-1853) Gravestone

Out of the blue, I received an email from David saying:

"In my barn I have the Headstone for Cornelius Feather !!! My Father says it was the outside step to an old building when he was a child, Dad is 80 this year! I googled the name this morning and Your blog popped up and there he was Cornelius Feather !!! Another site shows his son John is buried in Oak Hill Cemetery in Sandy Lake, approximately 5 miles from my house.


"Give me your feedback, I am kind of excited to finally put some history to a stone slab I have been storing for 60 years !!"

Needless to say, I was excited to receive David's email, so I responded and asked if he could provide a photograph of the stone.  He sent the photograph to me last night.  Here is the photo of the stone in David's barn:


The inscription reads:

CORNELIUS,
FEATHER

DIED

Apr. 1, 1853
Agd 76 yrs
1 mo. 7 d.

If the age at death is correct, then his birth date is 25 February 1777.


My problem now is how to source this "artifact" - when in doubt, use the "Artifact" source template:

Cornelius Feather gravestone, in owner's barn, created after 1 April 1853, privately held by [name and address for private use], Clarks Mills, Penn., 2017. Gravestone was outside step on home of his father, now in the owner's barn.

In a subsequent email, David noted that there was also a gravestone for a Levina, but that they don't know where it is.

I wonder if Levina is the name of Cornelius Feather's first wife?  No researcher knows anything about Cornelius Feather's first wife.  I wrote about what I know about this first wife in The Elusive --?-- (who married Cornelius Feather).

Once again, geneablogging and cousin bait works.  My thanks to David for being curious about the gravestone in his barn and being able to find my blog post about Cornelius Feather.  

Now I need to add David's barn in Mercer County, Pennsylvania to my bucket list!

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