Friday, July 3, 2015

How Many Signers of the Declaration of Independence Am I Related To?

With the Fourth of July upon us, I recalled that the BYU Relative Finder (www.RelativeFinder.org) would crawl through the FamilySearch Family Tree and tell me the answer to my question.

On the Relative Finder page, after signing into FamilySearch, one of the Public Groups I could select was "Declaration Signers:"


The program quickly gave me 30 signers of the Declaration of Independence who are my relatives, according to the information in the FamilySearch Family Tree.  The signers with the closest relationship to me include;

*  Robert Treat Paine is my 1st cousin 8 times removed
*  William Williams is my 3rd cousin 6 times removed
*  John Hart is my 2nd cousin 9 times removed
*  (Pres.) John Adams is my 3rd cousin 8 times removed
*  Jeremiah Clark is my 3rd cousin 8 times removed
*  Stephen Hopkins is my 4th cousin 7 times removed
*  William Ellery is my 3rd cousin 9 times removed
*  John Hancock is my 5th cousin 6 times removed
*  Samuel Adams is my 4th cousin 8 times removed
*  Josiah Bartlett is my 5th cousin 7 times removed.

I clicked on my closest relative, Robert Treat Paine, and saw the summary listing out common ancestor as Samuel Treat.  There are several links at the bottom of the screen:


 I clicked on the "View Relationship Chart" and saw the line from our common ancestor to my famous cousin Robert (on the left) and myself (on the right) (note that I didn't show the remainder of my line):


On the summary page, there was a link to "View all Common Ancestors."  I clicked that and saw a list of common ancestors that I share with Robert Treat Paine:


As always with these collaborative family trees, the relationships are only as good as the information in the tree - both in my line and in the cousin's line.  In this case, I think the chart above is correct.  I looked at several others and noted what I consider obvious problems back in the 1550-1700 time frame where there are apparent errors which need to be corrected.  I'll add them to my long list of things to do in the Family Tree.

he URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.



52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 79: #94 Joseph Champlin (1757-1850)

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I am extending this theme in 2015 to 104 Ancestors in 104 Weeks. Here is my ancestor biography for week #79:

 Joseph Champlin (1757-1850) is #94 on my Ahnentafel list, my 4th great-grandfather, married in 1785 to #95 Nancy Kenyon (1765-????).



I am descended through:

*  their daughter 
#47 Amy Champlin (1798-1865) who married #46 Jonathan Oatley (1792-1872), in 1813.  
*  their daughter, #23 Amy Frances Oatley (1826-1864) who married #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) in 1848.
*  their daughter, #11 Julia E. White (1848-1913), who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) in 1868. 
*  their daughter, #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962),  who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) in 1900.
* their son, #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983), who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son, #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

 =====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                   Joseph Champlin[1–10]   
*  Sex:                       Male   

*  Father:                  Elijah Champlin (1730-1779)   
*  Mother:                Phoebe Card (1730-1787)   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Birth:                   about 1757, Charlestown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1]
*  Census:               1 August 1790 (about age 32), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[2]
*  Census:              1 June 1800 (about age 42), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[3]
*  Census:              1 June 1810 (about age 52), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[4]
*  Census:              1 June 1820 (about age 62), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[5]
*  Pension:             18 July 1833 (about age 75), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[6]
*  Census:              1 June 1840 (about age 82), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[7]
Census                1 June 1850 (about age 92) South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[8]   
*  Death:                17 June 1850 (about age 92), Worcester, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[9–10]
*  Probate:             after 17 June 1850 (after about age 92), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[10]   
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Spouse 1:             Nancy Kenyon (1765-    )   
*  Marriage 1:          before 1785 (before about age 27), probably South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1]   

*  Child 1:               Samuel Champlin (1785-1874)   
*  Child 1:               Phoebe Champlin (1788-1879)   
*  Child 1:               Mary "Polly" Champlin (1790-    )   
*  Child 1:               Joseph Champlin (1792-1877)   
*  Child 1:               Nancy Champlin (1794-1821)   
*  Child 1:               Elizabeth "Betsey" Champlin (1796-    )   
*  Child 1:               Amy Champlin (1798-1865)   
*  Child 1:               George Hazard Champlin (1799-1865)   
*  Child 1:               Frances Gardiner Champlin (1800-1880)   
*  Child 1:               Abigail Champlin (1802-1861)   
*  Child 1:               John Kenyon Champlin (1804-    )   
*  Child 1:               Alice Champlin (1808-1876)   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

 The most complete family history is by Robert Champlin of Newmarket, Ontario.  He provided a computer file of many of the early Champlin families.  The information below was compiled on July 17, 2000 by Robert Champlin (bchamplin@rogers.com ) and supplied by him for the personal use of the readers.[1]

"Joseph Champlin, son of Elijah Champlin and Phoebe Card, was born at Charlestown, Rhode Island c1756-1758. He died in 1850 at South Kingstown, Rhode Island. According to his Revolutionary War Pension File, Joseph died in 1852 at Worcester, Massachusetts. However, his will (which was written on February 14, 1850) was proved at South Kingstown on August 12, 1850. 

"The Historical Gazetteer and Biographical Memorial of Cattaraugus County, New York (published 1893) claimed that: "Joseph Champlin, a soldier in the Revolution and in the War of 1812, was killed in a railroad accident near Utica, New York. He was an active man and a farmer, and reared seven children." 

"Hunter offers yet another version of this story, stating that Joseph was on his way to visit a son at Rome, New York when he was killed in 1852 in a train accident at Worcester Junction, Massachusetts. Hunter further alleges that Joseph's Will was "offered for Probate at Utica, New York on January 15, 1852". 

"It's rather difficult to believe that a man nearly 100 years old would be traveling by train through several states. It is also odd that a resident of Rhode Island who was killed in Massachusetts on his way to a visit in New York would have his Will probated in New York.

"He served several times during the Revolution and was known by neighbors and friends as "Revolutionary Joseph." During one enlistment, he was shipwrecked off the coast of Virginia and nearly perished. During another enlistment, he fought at Howland's Ferry Bridge during the Battle of Rhode Island. Joseph served in both the Massachusetts Militia and the Massachusetts Continentals as a Private. 

"On August 16, 1833 at the age of 75, Joseph was put on the roll of pensioners and received an annual pension of $50. He had applied at South Kingstown on July 18, 1833. According to testimony, he served on five different occasions as described below:

1. 1775 - 1 month as a Private in Capt. Samuel Segar's Co.
2. 1776 - 2 months as a Private in Captain Samuel Potter's Militia Company.
3. 1777 - 5 months as a Private under Captain Samuel Potter again.
4. 1778 - 1 month as a Private in Captain Timothy Locke's Company, Colonel Dyer's Regiment under General Sullivan
5. 1780 - 6 months as a Private in Capt. Daniel Dexter's Co. of the Continental Army, Col. Green's Regiment"

"Joseph married Nancy Kenyon, daughter of John and Amey (-?-) Kenyon of Richmond, Rhode Island and they had twelve children:

"2140. Samuel (1785)
2129. Phoebe (1788)
2130. Mary (Polly) ( )
2139. Joseph (1792)
2135. Amey (1797)
2131. George Hazard (1799)
2132. Nancy ( )
2134. Abigail ( )
2137. John Kenyon (1800)
2133. Elizabeth (1805)
2136. Frances Gardiner (1806)
2138. Alice (1808)"

In the 1790 U.S. Census, the Joseph Champlin household in South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, included[2]:

*  one male over age 16
*  1 male under age 16
*  3 females

In the 1800 U.S. Census, the Joseph Champlin household in South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, included[3]:

*  3 males under age 10
*  1 male aged 10 to 16
*  1 male aged 26 to 45 (certainly Joseph)

*  5 females under age 10
*  1 female aged 26 to 45

In the 1810 U.S. Census, the Joseph Champlin household in South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, included[4]:

*  2 males aged 10 to 15
*  2 males aged 16 to 26
*  1 male over age 45 (certainly Joseph)

*  4 females under age 10
*  3 females aged 10 to 15
*  2 females aged 16 to 26
*  1 female over age 45

In the 1820 U.S. Census, the Joseph Champlin household in South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, included[5]:

*  2 males aged 26 to 45
*  1 male over age 45 (certainly Joseph)

*  2 females aged 10-15
*  2 females aged 16 to 25
*  1 female over age 45

Additional information from his Revolutionary War Pension File[6]:

Joseph Champlin was put on the roll of pensioners on 16 August 1833 at age 73, and received an annual pension of $50, commencing 4 March 1834.  He applied at South Kingstown on 18 July 1833.  The affidavit taken by the Justice of the Peace in the pension application (Revolutionary War Pension File S 21,693) reads:

"Washington, State of Rhode Island & Providence Plantation, South Kingstown, July 18th, 1833:
Personally appeared before me, the undersigned a Justice of the Peace in the town of South Kingstown and State of Rhode Island, Joseph Champlin of South Kingstown aforesaid who is an applicant for a pension who being duly sworn before it and saith that by reason of old age and the consequent loss of memory he can not swear positively as to the precise length of his service but according to the best of his recollection he served not less than the periods mentioned below in the following grades:

"For & in the year 1774 one month I served as a private in Capt. Samuel Segar's company of militia.

"In the year 1776 two months as a private in Capt. Samuel Potter's company of militia, omitted see the original declaration of the draftsman.

"In the year 1777 five months I served as a private in Capt. Samuel Potter's company of Militia.

"In the year 1778 one month I served as a private in Capt. Timothy Lock's Company of Militia in Col. Charles Dyer's regiment in Sullivan's expedition under the command of Gen. Sullivan on Rhode Island.

"In the year 1780 six months as a private in Capt. Daniel Dexter's company in the Continental Army, the regiment commanded by Col. Green. Samuel Hurd Lieut. Col. and ---- Flagg Major of the regiment.

"Making in the whole fifteen months and for such service I claim a pension.
Witness W. Updike                                          his
to J. Champlin's signature                  Joseph   +   Champlin
                                                                      mark

"State of Rhode Island & Washington Co., So. Kingstown July 18th, 1833
Personally appeared Joseph Champlin the abovesaid deponent & before deposing as aforesaid was by me carefully cautioned examined & sworn to testify to the truth the whole truth & nothing but the truth. Which said affidavit was by me reduced to writing in his presence and by him agreed in my presence.  I also certify that the said Joseph Champlin is well known to me and retains a fair character for truth ... and that his affidavit is entitled to full & implicit order.
William Updike, Just. Peace"

On 4 September 1833, Joseph Champlin, a resident of South Kingstown aged 73 years, testified in the Court of Common Pleas in Washington County, Rhode Island.  He recounted his service record, and several others testified on his behalf.  The court declared their opinion that the applicant was a Revolutionary Soldier and served as he states.

In the 1840 U.S. Census, Joseph Champlin was enumerated in the household of Frederic Chappell, as aged 80 to 89,  and as a Veteran aged 81 years old[7].

In the 1850 U.S. Census, the Joseph Champlin household in South Kingstown, Washington County, Rhode Island, included[8]:

*  Joseph Champlin - age 57, male, a farmer, $6,00 in real property, born R.I.
*  Mary Champlin - age 54, female, born R.I.
*  John H. Champlin - age 28, male, a farmer, born R.I.
*  Charles Champlin - age 23, male, a farmer, born R.I.
*  Isra T. Champlin - age 18, male, a farmer, born R.I.
*  Samuel E. Champlin - age 16, male, a farmer, born R.I.
*  Mary Champlin - age 23, female, born R.I.
*  Esther Champlin - age 31, female, born R.I.
*  Joanna H. Champlin - age 15, female, born R.I., attends school
*  Abigail Champlin - age 14, female, born R.I., attends school
*  Caroline Champlin - age 12, female, born R.I., attends school
*  Joseph Champlin senr - age 92, male, a farmer, born R.I.

The death entry in the Massachusetts Vital Records for Worcester, Massachusetts has this information for Joseph Champlin[9]:

*  Date of death:  17 June 1850
*  Name:  Joseph Champlin
*  Age:  92
*  Sex and Condition:  Male, Widower
*  Occupation:  Farmer
*  Birthplace:  So. Kingston
*  Parents Names:  Elijah and Phoebe Champlin
*  Cause of Death:  Killed by the Cars

Joseph Champlin of South Kingstown wrote a will dated 14 February 1850, which was proved 12 August 1850 (South Kingston (RI) Town Council Records, 1704-1943, Volume 6, page 262, clerk's copy from FHL Microfilm 0,931,838)[10].  The will reads:

"Be it remembered that I Joseph Champlin of South Kingstown in the County of Washington &c Yeoman being advanced in years and infirm of body but of sane mind do make and ordain this my last Will & Testament.

"Principally and first of all I recomend my Soul to God and my body to the earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my executors hereafter named and as touching such worldly estate wherewith it hath pleased God to bless me in this life I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner, viz:

"1st  My Will is that all my just debts & funeral expenses to be paid out of my personal estate as soon after my decease as is possibly convenient.

"2nd  To my daughter Francis Tucker (wife of Nathan Tucker Jr.) I give and bequeath the interest arising on the sum or share in my estate which I hereafter give to her daughter Amy Tucker to be paid by my executors hereafter named) to said Francis yearly and every year during the time of her natural life.

"3rd  To my daughters Phebe Kenyon - Polly Willcox - Amy Oatley - Elizabeth Hazard and to the children of my daughter Nancy Kenyon decd (who are to have the same share in my estate that their mother would have were she living) and to my sons Joseph Champlin Jr, John H. Champlin, and George H. Champlin and my daughter Abby Kenyon and my Grand daughter Amy Tucker I give devise and bequeath all the rest, residue and remainder of my estate real and personal to my said children and grandchildren and to their heirs and assigns forever.

"And lastly I hereby nominate and appoint my sons Joseph Champlin Jun. and George H. Champlin the executors of this my last will and testament hereby revoking and annulling all former or other wills by me made.  In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal at South Kingstown aforesaid this fourteenth day of February in the year of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifty 1850.

"Signed, sealed, published pronounced and
declared by said Joseph Champlin as and his
for his last will and testament in presence of us    Joseph X   Champlin   (seal)
who at his request and in his presence and signature
in the presence of each other have hereunto
subscribed our names as witnesses to the same.
Benj. Hull
Wager Weeden
George G. Church"

On 12 August 1850, the will was presented to the Court of Probate of South Kingstown for probate and approval and all the subscribing witnesses were present and testified that they saw Joseph Champlin sign and seal the will and heard him declare it to be his last will and testament, and at the time he appeared to be of sane disposing mind and memory.  The clerk approved and allowed the will, and it was recorded on 23 August 1850.

On 12 August 1850, The Probate Court also appointed Joseph Champlin and George H. Champlin to execute the last will and testament of their father, having accepted the trust and given bond as the Law directs. They were empowered to recover all debt and take possession of the estate and to administer the estate according to the Law and the will.

The inventory of the estate was taken by Hezekiah Babcock, George C. Babcock and William S. Perry included:

"The Inventory of the Goods and Chattles, Rights and Credits which were of Joseph Champlin of South Kingstown deceased, shown and set forth to us by (his sons) Joseph Champlin and George H. Champlin - Executors of the last Will and Testament of said Joseph Champlin, taken and appraised by us by virtue of appointment by the Honourable the Court of Probate of the town of South Kingstown, dated 12 August 1850, by Hezekiah Babcock, George C. Babcock, and William S. Perry."

The inventory included:

*  One note signed by John E. Weeden as principal &
Wager Weeden as surety at Westerly 25 March 1848
for six hundred and one 74/100 dollars @ 5 pc of 601.74
Interest to 12 August 1850 71.62 .........................................  673.36
*  One note signed by Benedict Kenyon South Kingstown
Oct 2 1845 for one hundred fifty eight dollars 158 interest
as above $46.08 ................................................................ 204.08
*  One note signed by Joseph Champlin Jr. South Kingstown
March 25 1850 for seven hundred dollars with interest
@ 5 percent 700 Interest as above 13.32 ...............................  713.32
*  One note signed by Joseph Champlin the 3rd So. Kingstown
April 2 1849 for fifty four 14/100 dollars with interest @ 5 pr ct .. 47.13
*  One note signed by Joseph Champlin 3rd So. Kingstown
March 25 1850 for one hundred and seventy dollars with interest
at 6 per cent after March 25 1850 after March 25 1851
= 170 discount 6.32 ...........................................................  163.68
*  One note signed by Joseph Champlin 3rd So. Kingstown
March 25 1850 for one hundred dollars with interest at 5 percent
6 after  March 25 1851  100 Discount 3.08 ............................    96.92
*  Cash on hand in the hands of Joseph Champlin one
hundred and twenty 36/100 dollars .......................................  120.36
*  Cash on hand in the hands of George H. Champlin to
four hundred and one 25/100 dollars .....................................  401.25
Total Amount      2420.10
*  Also a mortgage deed from Samuel Champlin to Joseph
Champlin dated So Kingstown April 6 1850
for four hundred and twenty five dollars purporting to
be surety for a certain note which was not presented.

*  Fees for taking inventory       George C. Babcock   3.00
and attending court                  Wm S. Perry            3.00
                                                  Hezekiah Babcock    2.00

The foregoing inventory was presented to the Court on 9 September 1850 and was approved on 11 September 1850.

On 11 August 1851, Samuel Champlin appealed the will of Joseph Champlin to the Supreme Court of Rhode Island meeting at South Kingstown.  The entire will and the Court orders made on 12 August 1850 were entered into the record (page 304ff).  After reviewing the court records, the original will, and hearing the testimony of witnesses, the Supreme Court upheld the last will and testament of Joseph Champlin and the actions of the Probate court.  This was certified on 25 September 1851 (recorded 1 November 1851).

An account of the estate of Joseph Champlin was filed by the executors on 9 October 1854 (page 403).  In addition to the notes itemized above, additional funds were received from pension money, court costs for the lawsuit, rent of the home farm for three years, from Mary Willcox, from sale of home farm, interest on notes, cash and sale of land.  The total funds in the account before expenses was $5214.78. Money was paid to Joseph Champlin and George H. Champlin for compensation, services, travel and expenses, and council and clerk's fees.  The total remaining in the account was $4755.73.

No distribution of the estate is recorded in the Probate Court records.  Presumably, the four named daughters received one third of the estate (the share their mother would have received - about 1/12 of the estate each), and the three named sons, daughter Abby Kenyon and granddaughter Amy Tucker received equal shares of the balance (that is, one fifth of the two thirds balance, or 2/15 of the estate each).

The Samuel Champlin who brought the lawsuit before the Supreme Court is probably the eldest son of Joseph and Nancy (Kenyon) Champlin.  It is unknown why he was not provided for in the will - perhaps he had already received his portion of the estate or perhaps he was disowned by his father.  Note also that the youngest daughter, Alice (Champlin) Tucker was not named in the will for some reason.
 
5)  SOURCES

1. Robert R. Champlin, Champlin Families in America (Newmarket, Ontario : the author, 2011, provided by email to Randy Seaver), #1691: Joseph Champlin Family sketch.

2. 1790 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 102 (penned), Joseph Champlin household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M637, Roll 10.

3. 1800 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 690 (stamped), Joseph Champlin household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M32, Roll 46.

4. 1810 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 59 (penned), Joseph Champlin household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M292, Roll 59.

5. 1820 United States Federal Census, Population Schedule, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 127 (penned), Joseph Champlin household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M33, Roll 115.

6. "Revolutionary War Pension and Bounty-Land Warrant Application Files,"  online database with digital images, Fold3.com (http://www.Fold3.com) : 2011), original records in National Archives Publication M804, Pension Application S21,693, Joseph Champlin of South Kingstown, R.I., applied 18 July 1833.

7. 1840 United States Federal Census, Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 411 (penned), Frederic Chappell household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M704, Roll 506.

8. "United States Census, 1850 (Mortality Schedule)", Washington County, Rhode Island, South Kingstown, page 353A (stamped), Dwelling #267, Family #310, Joseph Champlin household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, Roll 847.

9. "Massachusetts Vital Records, 1841-1915," digital images,  New England Historic Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (http://www.AmericanAncestors.org), Deaths, Volume 50, page 158, Worcester, Mass., Joseph Champlin, age 92, entry.

10. South Kingston (R.I.) Town Clerk, "Town Council Records, 1704-1943,"  (South Kingston, R.I.), on 8 microfilm reels, Volume 6 (1704-1943), pages 262ff, Joseph Champlin probate records, clerk's copy from FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,931,838.


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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/07/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-79-94.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, July 2, 2015

What Facts Show Up in an Ancestry.com LifeStory?

I wish I knew the answer to this question.  It's very frustrating sometimes.

I have added many different "Facts," "sources" and "Media" for my families in my RootsMagic 7 program, and have uploaded the GEDCOM file to Ancestry.com.  The "Facts," "Sources," and "Media" that I have uploaded show up in the "Facts" list for a person in my Ancestry Member Tree.

1)  For instance, here is the top of the "Facts" page (two screens shown) for my grandfather, Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942):



When I entered information into my RootsMagic program, I used the "Census" Fact for the census enumerations because that Fact incorporates much more information than just a "Residence."  It usually includes a name, an age, an occupation, immigration information, etc. and not just a residence.

2)  The only images that show up in the LifeStory for my grandfather are Birth, Marriage, Death and Residence events. 

But the "Census" Fact does not show up in the LifeStory list for some reason.  The Census, World War I draft registration, occupation, burial, obituary and funeral Facts that I have entered along with source citations and media items for these Facts do not show up in the LifeStory.

There are probably other Facts that are in my Facts list for other persons in my tree that don't show up in the LifeStory.  I don't know all of them.

I tested the "Residence" Fact to see if it would show up in the LifeStory.  Here is the top of the LifeStory for my grandfather:


On the Fact list, I added a "Residence" Fact for the 1880 U.S. Census, then connected the existing media item and the source citation.  I Saved the "Residence" Fact.

Then I went back to the LifeStory and sure enough the record image and the Fact information was now in the LifeStory:


3)  Ancestry.com provides a long list of possible Facts that can be added to the Facts list of a person.  Here is an image of the top of that list (you can see it by clicking on the "Add" button and then clicking on the "Select an event type" to see the list):



4)  My question is:  Why doesn't Ancestry.com use EVERY Fact type on the list to construct the LifeStory?  Aren't these Fact types important in the life of the person?  

I have the different Facts in my person profiles for a reason - they are events in the life of my person.  In many cases, I have a Media item associated with the Fact which should show up on the LifeStory.

I know that the Census record will show up on the Fact list and on the LifeStory as a "Residence" Fact.  But a record image attached to the Fact does not show up.  For a Census record, the "Residence" is the only Fact that is added to the LifeStory.  A Marital status note appears which is not very useful.  No Occupation, or Age, or other Fact is added to the Fact list from a Census record.

Not every person attaches an Ancestry.com record to the Facts in their Ancestry Member Tree.  On this particular tree, I don't do that because it is a "working tree" - one I upload occasionally as cousin bait.

5)  One more thing.  Yet the LifeStory of my grandfather has ZERO Historical Insights included.  Why?  My grandfather lived from 1876 to 1942.  Surely there were some notable Historical Insights (the newest feature of the New Ancestry design) during this period - I can think of the Spanish-American War, election of about 10 Presidents, World War I, the 1918 Influenza pandemic, the Great Depression, the start of World War II, etc.  (Yes, I checked the "Show historical insights" link to make sure).

6)  I like the LifeStory concept, but the implementation to date is lacking, in my humble opinion.  All of my Facts should be included, the Media items attached to those Facts should be included, and a reasonable number of Historical Events should be provided.

My opinion is that if you are going to create new features, and advertise the benefits of the new features, that they should be attractive, useful and helpful to the user, and especially to new users.  It should be a "WOW" factor for users.

What do my readers think about this?  Are you happy with the LifeStory feature two months after it was introduced?

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/07/what-facts-show-up-in-ancestrycom.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Treasure Chest Thursday - Post 269: 1855 New York State Census for Amos Underhill Household in Aurora, N.Y.

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the  1855 New York State Census for the Amos Underhill household in Aurora, Erie county, New York:


The Amos Underhill household (right page):


The extraction of information about this household (taken 2 July 1855):

*  Amos Underhill - age 80, male, born in New Hampshire, married, resided 43 years in this town, no occupation, a native voter, the owner of land.
*  Mary Underhill - age 74, female, wife, born in N.H., married, resided 43 years in this town
*  Delos Underhill - age 21, male, a grandson, born in Erie County, married, resided 21 years in this town, a farmer
*  Laura Underhill - age 23, female, a grandchild, born in Madison, married, resided 17 years in this town
*  Casper Archer - age 16, male, a servant, born in Germany, resided 6/12 years in this town, a laborer, an alien.

The source citation for this record is:

New York, State Census, 1855, Erie County, Aurora town, First election district, page 52 (penned), Amos Underhill household; digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 2 July 2015), citing Census of the state of New York, for 1855. Microfilm. New York State Archives, Albany, New York.

This record lists Amos as age 80, but he was really age 83, since he was born in April 1772.  His wife, Mary (Metcalf) Underhill was born in 1780.  She died in October 1855.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/07/treasure-chest-thursday-post-269-1855.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Wednesday, July 1, 2015

Search 13 Colonies Vital Records on Ancestry.com FREE Through July 5

I received this notice not via email today:





The list of the colonial vital records databases available through Sunday, July 5th is at  http://search.ancestry.com/search/grouplist.aspx?group=thirteen_colonies.  There is a search box for only the available databases.

Note that you will have to have a Guest Registration (not a subscription) in order to access these databases during the free period.

If you have colonial ancestors, this may be an excellent opportunity to search for records of those ancestors and their family members.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/07/search-13-colonies-vital-records-on.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com

Free Access to the Revolutionary War Collection Through July 15th on Fold3.com


I received this notice via email from Fold3.com today:
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As we celebrate America’s independence this month, learn more about the people who made it possible by exploring Fold3’s Revolutionary War Collection for free July 1st to 15th.

Popular titles for finding Revolutionary War ancestors include:
If you’re interested in the historical aspects of the war, you can explore thecaptured vessels prize casesRevolutionary War Milestone Documents, thePennsylvania ArchivesConstitutional Convention Records, and the papersand records of the Continental Congress, among others.
Full access to the Revolutionary War collection can help you find even more information on the people or events you’re researching. For example, let’s say you’re researching your ancestor James Morris of Connecticut. You can learn from his Revolutionary War pension file that he served in the Battle of Germantown, where he was taken prisoner of war for three years.

But your research doesn’t have to stop there. If you wanted to discover more about Morris than you found in his pension file, you could look in the Revolutionary War Rolls to find him listed on a muster rollduring his time as a prisoner. If you were interested in learning more what Morris’s time as a prisoner of war may have been like, you could search for accounts of other Revolutionary War POWs—in places like the pension files, the Pennsylvania Archives, the papers of the Continental Congress, and elsewhere.

Or if you’d rather flesh out your understanding of the battle Morris was captured in, then you could read George Washington’s own account of the Battle of Germantown in the papers of the Continental Congress.

There’s a lot to discover in the Revolutionary War Collection. Start your own exploration here.


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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2015/07/free-access-to-revolutionary-war.html

Copyright (c) 2015, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com