Friday, September 30, 2016

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 30 September 2016

I received this information from Findmypast today:

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New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday


Over 2.2 million new records are available to search this Findmypast Friday including:

Billion Graves Cemetery Index

Over 1.7 million new records have been added to our Billion Graves Cemetery index collections. With over 12 million headstone records, Billion Graves is the largest online resource for GPS-tagged headstone and burial records, allowing you to discover the exact location of your ancestor’s grave.

This latest update includes;
·         Over 1,4 million new additions to the United States Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 110,000 new additions to the Canada Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 107,000 new additions to the Australia Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 19,000 new additions to the England Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 16,000 new additions to the New Zealand Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 10,000 new additions to the Scotland Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 3,000 new additions to the Ireland Billion Graves Cemetery Index
·         Over 600 new additions to the Wales Billion Graves Cemetery Index

Theses index will be regularly updated throughout the year. Each entry has a transcript, which includes a link to an image of the headstone with GPS details. The amount of information listed may vary, but most records will include a combination of the deceased's name, birth date, death date, and cemetery, city, county and image link.


The British Army Worldwide Index 1851 contains over 156,000 records and index and covers over 300 regiments serving around the world.  A wide range of ranks is represented from privates and drivers to captains and lieutenants. The index was created by Roger E. Nixon using regimental muster books and pay lists, part of the War Office records, held at The National Archives. Each transcript will provide you with an archival reference from the original source and will reveal your ancestor’s service number, rank, and regiment, as well as where his regiment was serving at the time the record was created.

The regiments in this collection were serving in Malta, the West Indies, Ireland, Pakistan, Canada, Honduras, and more places around the world.


Over 1,000 records from Witton Cemetery in Birmingham (formally known as Birmingham City Cemetery) have been added to our collection of Warwickshire Burials. The entire collection now contains more than 1.1 million records.

Each record includes a transcript of the original burial registry or details from the monumental inscription. Each record will vary depending on its source, but most will include your ancestor's name, age, birth year, death date, burial year, burial location and the name of the officiating minister. A number of records will also include their parent's names and residence.


Over 372,000 articles from three brand new titles have just been added to our collection of historic Irish Newspapers; the Irish Times, Weekly Irish Times and the Waterford Standard.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

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52 Ancestors - Week 144: #189 Phoebe (Card) Champlin (1730-after 1779)

Here is my 52 Ancestors biography for week #144:

Phoebe (Card) Champlin (1730-1779)  is #189 on my Ahnentafel list, my 5th great-grandmother, who married #188 Elijah Champlin (1730-1779) in 1751.


I am descended through:

*  their son, #94 Joseph Champlin (1758-1850), 
who married #95 Nancy Kenyon (1765-1833) in 1785.
*  their daughter #47 Amy Champlin (1798-1865) who married #46 Jonathan Oatley (1790-1872)  in 1823. 
*  their daughter #23 Amy Frances Oatley (1826-1864) who married #22 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885) in 1844.
*  their daughter #11 Julie E. White (1848-1913), who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917) in 1868. 
*  their daughter #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962), who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) in 1900.
* their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983), who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                  Phoebe Card[1,3-4]   
*  Alternate Name:  Phebe Champlin[2]
*  Sex:                     Female   

*  Father:                 Job Card (1690-1760)   
*  Mother:               Judith Greenman (1694-1786)   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Birth:                   about 1730, Westerly, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1]   
*  Distribution:        11 March 1779 (about age 49), Elijah's will proved; South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[2]   
*  Death:                 after 1779 (after about age 49), South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States    
  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Spouse 1:             Elijah Champlin (1730-1779)   
*  Marriage:             27 November 1751 (about age 21) , South Kingstown, Washington, Rhode Island, United States[1,3–4]   

*  Child 1:               Phoebe Champlin (1752-    )   
*  Child 2:               Elijah Champlin (1756-1825)   
*  Child 3:               Joseph Champlin (1757-1850)   
*  Child 4:               William Champlin (1758-1844)   
*  Child 5:               Mary Champlin (1760-1801)   
*  Child 6:               Jeffrey Champlin (1761-1837)   
*  Child 7:               Hannah Champlin (1762-1831)   
*  Child 8:               Amy Champlin (1764-    )   
*  Child 9:               Anna Champlin (1766-    )   
*  Child 10:             Elizabeth Champlin (1768-    )   
*  Child 11:             Alice Champlin (1770-    )   
  
4) NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   

According to the "Descendants of Richard Card" article, Phoebe Card was the 7th child and 3rd daughter of Job and Judith (Greenman) Card, born in Westerly, Rhode Island[1].  

On November 27, 1751, Elijah married Phoebe Card of South Kingstown in a wedding ceremony performed by Justice Samuel Tefft. Elijah was the son of William Champlin and Joanna --?--, born about 1730 and died before 11 March 1779[1,4].

Elijah and Phoebe had eleven children, all probably born in Charlestown, Rhode Island[1,4]:

1695. Phoebe (born about 1752)
1690. Elijah (born 1756)
1691. Joseph (born  about 1758)
1692. William (born about 1759)
1693. Mary (born about 1760)
1689. Jeffrey (born 1761)
1694. Hannah (born about 1762)
1696. Amey (born about 1764)
1697. Anna (born about 1766)
1698. Elizabeth (born about 1768)
1699. Alice (born about 1770)

The will of Elijah Champlin, written on 14 January 1779 and proved 11 March 1779, bequeathed the remainder of his personal estate to his wife, Phebe Champlin for her support and support of their four youngest daughters[2]:

"And as to the rest of my Personal Estate be it of what kind or nature soever I give and bequeath the same to my well beloved Wife Phebe Champlin as well for the payment of all my Just Debts & Funeral Charges as also for the payment of the Legacies herein bequeathed and for her support & the support and maintenance of my four youngest daughters to wit Hannah, Anna, Elizabeth, & Alice, till they shall respectively be able to support themselves, and after that Time what I have herein given to my wife to remain to her own use forever."

Phebe (Card) Champlin was named an executrix of the estate of Elijah Champlin along with their eldest son, Elijah Champlin[2].  

There is no death date or death place noted in the "Descendants of Richard Card" article.  She probably died after 1779.

5)  SOURCES
 
1. Maxine Phelps Lines, "Descendants of Richard Card of Newport," Rhode Island Genealogical Register, Volume 3, Number 3 (January 1981) to Volume 4, Number 4 (April 1982), Volume 3, Number 4, Page 307, Phoebe Card sketch.

2. South Kingston (R.I.) Town Clerk, "Town Council Records, 1704-1943,"  (South Kingston, R.I.), on 8 microfilm reels, Volume 6, Pages 110-112, Elijah Champlin will, 1779, accessed on FHL Microfilm US/CAN 0,931,835.

3. "Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), Volume 5, Washington County: Births, Marriages, Deaths, South Kingstown Marriages, Page 11 (image 131 of 523), Elijah Champlain and Phebe Card entry.


4. Robert R. Champlin, Champlin Families in America (Newmarket, Ontario : the author 274 Plymouth Trail, Newmarket, Ontario, Canada L3Y 6G7, bchamplin@rogers.com 2011, provided by email to Randy Seaver), Elijah Champlin sketch.

NOTE:  Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I am extending this theme in 2016 to 156 Ancestors in 156 Weeks.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

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Thursday, September 29, 2016

Book Review: "The Spyglass File," by Nathan Dylan Goodwin

Author Nathan Dylan Goodwin provided me with a review copy of his latest book, The Spyglass File, three weeks ago and I have been reading several chapters almost every night.  This is the 4th Morton Farrier, Forensic Genealogy mystery and is excellent.


The summary of the book, from Amazon, is:

"Morton Farrier was no longer at the top of his game. His forensic genealogy career was faltering and he was refusing to accept any new cases, preferring instead to concentrate on locating his own elusive biological father. Yet, when a particular case presents itself, that of finding the family of a woman abandoned in the midst of the Battle of Britain, Morton is compelled to help her to unravel her past. Using all of his genealogical skills, he soon discovers that the case is connected to The Spyglass File—a secretive document which throws up links which threaten to disturb the wrongdoings of others, who would rather its contents, as well as their actions, remain hidden forever. "

Morton Farrier is a forensic genealogist based in Kent, England.  He has a client named Barbara, who was adopted as a baby and wants to know who her father was.  Her mother, Elsie Finch, was a married woman whose husband was not Barbara's father, according to an adoption record.  Elsie gave up her baby for adoption in 1941 during World War II.

There are two mystery stories here - there is what happened to Elsie Finch during World War II in Kent, and what happens to Morton Farrier during his search for Elsie's story and Barbara's father.  You see, Morton is also adopted, and is getting married, and the case is a challenge.  Danger lurks however.

Goodwin switches back and forth between the two stories - Elsie's life experiences as she lives through the Battle of Britain, and Morton's research as he tries to find out the identity of Barbara's father, while trying to get to the church on time for his own wedding.

I learned a lot about the historical setting and events for the Battle of Britain in the early 1940s - about the Dunkirk evacuation, about the German bombing of England, about the Royal Air Force and the Women's Auxiliary Air Force, even about Malta in the war.  I also learned about several new-to-me genealogical resources available for records of the period.

I really enjoyed this book.  If you like genealogical fiction and mysteries, you will love this book.

 You can read several chapters for free on the Amazon page, and can order the book for Kindle for $6.89 and in paperback for $12.99.

Nathan has a website - the page for this book is http://www.nathandylangoodwin.com/the-spyglass-file.  He has photos of places mentioned in the book and document examples found on Pinterest (https://uk.pinterest.com/dylan0470/).  He also has a blog - see  http://theforensicgenealogist.blogspot.co.uk/2016/09/the-story-behind-spyglass-file.html for the real-life background of this story.

My thanks to Nathan for sharing his book with me in PDF format -  I happily offered to write a review.

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The URL for this post is:   

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

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1764 Marriage Record for John Kenyon and Ann Kenyon -- Treasure Chest Thursday Post #333

This week's Thursday Treasure is the 1764 marriage record of John Kenyon and Ann Kenyon in Newport, Rhode Island:


The Kenyon marriage record is:


The transcription of this record is:

148   KENYON, John, and Ann Kenyon ; m. by Rev. Gardiner Thurston, April 24, 1764.

The source citation for this record is:

"Rhode Island, Vital Records Extracts, 1636-1899," indexed database and digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), "Vol. 04: Newport County: Births, Marriages and Deaths," Marriages, page 42, Ann Kenyon and John Kenyon entry.

This record seems to say that John Kenyon's wife was also a Kenyon.  As far as I know, no researcher has found the names of the parents of this Ann Kenyon or a birth date and place for her.  She was born in about 1742, probably in Rhode Island.

The number "148" in the record is a page number in some Newport record book which may or may not still be extant.   I should try to find it, I think.

This is Primary Information extracted from the Newport town records, and the book is a Derivative Source with Direct Evidence.

John and Ann *Kenyon?) Kenyon are my 5th great-grandparents.  I descend through their daughter Nancy Kenyon (1765-1833), who married Joseph Champlin (1758-1850).

NOTE:  Treasure Chest Thursday is one of the weekly genealogy blog themes on Geneabloggers.  I use it to display, transcribe and source records for my ancestral families.


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The URL for this post is:   http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/09/1764-marriage-record-for-john-kenyon.html

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

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Wednesday, September 28, 2016

Seavers in the News -- a 21 Year Courtship Consummated

This week's edition of Seavers in the news is a happy one (I think).


The transcription of this article is:

"TO MARRY AFTER COURTSHIP OF TWENTY-ONE YEARS.

"NEW YORK, October 26. -- There is about to be a wedding in St. Patrick's Church at Richmond, Staten Island, which will bring to a happy close a patient wooing.  John Seaver, the prospective bridgegroom, and Margaret M. Pfaff, the prospective bride, have had a courtship of twenty-one years because of the faithfulness of each to an invalid father.  Seaver is about 45 years old and Miss Pfaff is in the thirties.  Seaver's father died about five months ago, aged 86, and Miss Pfaff's father died a few weeks ago, aged 75."

The source citation is:

"To Marry After Courtship of Twenty-One Years," San Francisco [CA] Chronicle, online index and digital image, GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com), Sunday, 27 October 1907, page 31, column 7, John Seaver and Margaret M. Pfaff announcement.

According to the 1920 and 1930 U.S. Census records, Margaret was born in about 1865, so she was in her 40s in 1907 rather than her 30s.  I don't believe that they had any children.  But they are in my RootsMagic database as part of my Seaver one-name study.

John Seaver (1865-1932) was the son of Thomas Seaver (1819-1907) and Bridget Gaffney (1825-????), both born in Ireland.  Margaret Pfaff was probably the daughter of Jacob Pfaff (1831-1907) and Catherine --?-- (1831-1903).

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

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Twile Integrates with FamilySearch

I received this press release today:

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Twile Integrates with FamilySearch

LONDON, UK and SALT LAKE CITY, UT (September 14, 2016)—Twile and FamilySearch International have announced the launch of a new feature that will let FamilySearch.org users generate a family history timeline and share their research with other family members online. The timeline is designed to make research and discoveries more engaging for the broader family—especially younger generations—and to encourage collaboration.  

Connecting securely to FamilySearch.org, Twile imports a user’s tree and automatically adds events, such as births and marriages, to a personal, interactive timeline of their family history. Users can then browse the timeline, add photos, and share it privately with other family members.

By presenting a family tree as a timeline, Twile makes it easier for non-genealogists in a family to explore their ancestry through events, stories, and pictures. It also encourages collaboration by letting them add missing details, their own life events, and recent photos.

UK-based Twile won two awards in the Innovator Showdown at RootsTech 2016, including the People’s Choice award. In response to customer requests, Twile immediately started development on its FamilySearch integration.

Paul Brooks, Twile CEO, said, “The FamilySearch import has been our most requested feature, especially following our success at RootsTech. We have a passionate community of FamilySearch users who have waited patiently while we built it, and we’re so happy that it’s now ready for them.”

Currently, the integration imports FamilySearch’s Family Tree data into Twile. Soon, Twile will be adding support for FamilySearch’s memories and photos plus an automatic synchronisation that will keep the Twile timeline up to date as FamilySearch records change.

“FamilySearch is always looking for fun, engaging experiences that help our patrons make new personal discoveries and family connections. Twile’s rich, custom timeline of key family history events does exactly that!” said Steve Rockwood, FamilySearch CEO.

To utilize the new feature, FamilySearch users will need to register for Twile at www.twile.com. The basic service is free and lets users add up to 10 events and photos per month, while a Twile Premium account allows subscribers to add unlimited events and photos for $49.99 per year.

About FamilySearch

FamilySearch is the largest genealogy organization in the world and is a nonprofit, volunteer-driven organization sponsored by The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints. Millions of people use FamilySearch records, resources, and services to learn more about their family history. To help in this great pursuit, FamilySearch and its predecessors have been actively gathering, preserving, and sharing genealogical records worldwide for over 100 years. Patrons may access FamilySearch services and resources for free at FamilySearch.org or through more than 4,921 family history centers in 129 countries, including the main Family History Library in Salt Lake City, Utah.

About Twile

Twile is a UK-based interactive timeline of your family’s past, present, and future. The timeline consists of photos and milestones—such as births, marriages, and deaths—that tell the story of your family from your earliest known ancestor right through to today. Family historians can import their family tree from FamilySearch and then add more recent events from their own life before inviting their family members to explore and contribute. 

While the Twile website is aimed primarily at family historians, it is also designed to encourage the rest of the family to add their own content, including the younger generations. Since its beginnings, Twile has been backed by Creative England, a number of UK angel investors and Findmypast, with whom they partnered in February 2016. Twile was the winner of two innovation awards at RootsTech 2016, including People’s Choice.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver



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Visiting the Allen County Public Library - Part 1: Post 432 for (Not So) Wordless Wednesday

During our 2011 vacation to Springfield, Illinois and surrounding states, I had one day  in the Genealogy Center at the Allen County Public Library in Fort Wayne, Indiana.  I wrote about it in Day 7 on the Seaver Midwest Genealogy Tour (posted 12 September 2011).

Here are some of the photographs I took during my visit:

1)  The outside of the library:



2)  The entrance to the Genealogy Center:


3)  A neat sign on the wall inside the Genealogy Center:


4)  At the entrance to the Center, there is an Abraham Lincoln display:


5)  The chart on the right is a Lincoln family tree:




This was a very fun genealogy day - I got to see Curt Witcher in his native surroundings and to research in this excellent genealogy haven.

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Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver


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Tuesday, September 27, 2016

Tuesday's Tip - Check Out Digitized Genealogy and Family History Books

This week's Tuesday's Tip is to check out digitized genealogy and family history books to find books or articles about your ancestors.

There are a number of websites that have digitized genealogy and family history books, such as compiled surname genealogies, locality history and records, etc.:

1)  Google Books (https://books.google.com) - has over 30 million digitized books free to access.

2)  Internet Archive (https://archive.org/) - has over 10 million digitized books free to access.

3)  HathiTrust Digital Library (https://www.hathitrust.org/) - has over 14 million digitized books free to access.

4)  MyHeritage Books and Publications (https://www.myheritage.com/research/category-8020/books-publications) - has over 447,000 genealogy-related digitized books free to access.


5)  FamilySearch Books (https://books.familysearch.org/) - has over 280,000 genealogy-related digitized books and manuscripts free to access:


6)  Genealogy Gophers (https://www.gengophers.com/#/) - has over 80,000 genealogy-related digitized books free to access.


7)  Ancestry (http://www.ancestry.com) - has over 23,000 digitized genealogy-related books, not free to access).

8)  GenealogyBank (http://www.genealogybank.com) - has over 14,000 digitized genealogy-related books, not free to access).

Each site has a different set of search fields and search options (e.g., wild cards, exact matches, included words, excluded words).

There are other digitized books websites with significant genealogy and family history hol;dings - which ones should I add to this list?

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/09/tuesdays-tip-check-out-digitized.html

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Treasure Chest Tuesday -- 1920 U.S. Census for the A.H. Leland Household in Spring Coulee, Okanagan County, Washington

This week's Tuesday Treasure is the 1920 United States Federal Census record for the A.H. Leland  household in Spring Coulee, Okanagan County, Washington:



The A. H. Leland household information:



The extracted information for the A.H. Leland household is:

*  A.H. Leland - head, rents home, male, white, age 29, married, born Wisconsin, parents born Norway/Norway, a farmer, works on general farm, works on own account
*  Vinie M. Leland - wife, female, white, age 26, married, born Idaho, parents born US/Nebraska
*  Robert H. Leland - son, male, white, age 6, single, born Washington, parents born Wisconsin/Idaho
*  Beverly A. Leland - daughter, female, white, age 3, single, born Washington, parents born Wisconsin/Idaho

*  T.S. Leland - father, male, white, age 69, widowed, immigrated in 1856, naturalized in 1876, born Norway, parents born Norway/Norway, works on son's farm w... ..... specially for him

The source citation for this record is:

1920 United States Federal Census, Okanagan County, Washington, population schedule, Spring Coulee, ED 97, Page 2A, dwelling #30, family #30, A.H. Leland household, digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 March 2015); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication T625, Roll 1934.

Arthur Henry Leland was the youngest son of Torger and Anna (Natvig) Leland, and in the 1920 United States census the family resided in Spring Coulee, Okanagan County, Washington.  Arthur's wife was Malvina (Whitley) Leland, and they had two sons by 1920.  T.S. Leland is Torger Sjursen Leland, Arthur's father, now widowed and moved west to be with his family.

Torger Sjursen Leland is my wife's great-grandfather, through his eldest son Severt Oliver Leland (1878-1940).

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/09/treasure-chest-tuesday-1920-us-census.html

Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Monday, September 26, 2016

Censuswhacking Historical Names in the 1940 Census

I'm always intrigued by the census records that have historical given names and historical given-last name combinations.  I used the 1940 United States census on Ancestry.com to find:

1)  LENIN -- 86 matches for given name Lenin:


There is a Lenin Romanoff residing in Spokane, Washington.

There are 124 matches for the surname of Lenin.

2)  STALIN -- There are 26 matches for given name Stalin

There are 113 matches for the surname Stalin, including a Joseph Stalin in King County, Washington, and another in Tazewell County, Illinois.

3)  MUSSOLINI -- There are 4 matches for given name Mussolini.

There are 24 matches for the surname Mussolini.

4)  WINSTON CHURCHILL -- There are 36 persons named Winston Churchill.

5)  KING GEORGE -- There are 16 persons named King George.

6)  FRANKLIN ROOSEVELT -- There are 6 persons named Franklin Roosevelt.

7)  THEODORE ROOSEVELT -- There are 18 persons named Theodore Roosevelt.

8)  HERBERT HOOVER -- There are 201 persons named Herbert Hoover.

9)  DONALD DUCK -- there are 12 persons named Donald Duck.

10)   QUEEN VICTORIA -- there are two persons named Queen Victoria.

What famous names do you suggest for the 1940 U.S. census?

NOTE:  I stole this idea from Kirsty Gray (see http://family-wise.co.uk/world-war-naming-patterns/), and expanded it a bit.  Thanks, Kirsty!

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2016/09/censuswhacking-historical-names-in-1940.html


Copyright (c) 2016, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.