Monday, November 20, 2017

Monday Genea-Pourri

Here are some of my genealogy-related activities over the past week or so:

1)  23andMe has revised their Ancestry Composition numbers, but mine haven't changed much.  My "revised" ethnicity is:
*  47.9% British and Irish
*  26.0% French and German
*  2.0% Scandinavian
*  21% Broadly Northwestern European
*  1.3% Broadly Southern European
*  1.1% Broadly European

*  0.4% Native-American
*  0.1% Broadly East Asian and Native-American

*  0.1% North African

*  <0.1% Unassigned

I have only one match on 23andMe that is third cousin or closer. 

2)  My AncestryDNA Shared Ancestors increased from 231 to 237, but all of them are really distant relatives - 5th to 8th cousins.  

3)  I received an email from a reader asking me to help track down details of her grandmother's death by murder in 1980 in Los Angeles.  I checked the newspapers sites that I have access to (GenealogyBank, Ancestry, Findmypast (has NewspaperARCHIVE), Elephind (has Chronicling America)), but none had a Los Angeles newspaper for 1980.  Apparently, Newspapers.com has the full run of the Los Angeles Times newspapers, and a search there in just 1980 revealed 17 articles with the grandmother's name.  I recommended my reader start a trial subscription there and see if those articles reveal more details.

4)  We had a fast-paced Mondays With Myrt Hangout today - see   https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xfh3Q-py0LY I was able to participate for the full time today.  The panel discussed GEDCOM file uploads to the "Genealogies" section if FamilySearch, the Feedly news reader, the NextGen Genealogy Network and BlackProGen LIVE YouTube programs, the DAR, True Lewis's visit to Harrisburg, Living DNA, Slow Blogging, the WeRemember Ancestry story telling site, and my RootsTech registration contest.

5)  Denmark census records and the Denmark Church Records record collections came online on FamilySearch in the last week.  I looked for my grandsons' 2nd and 3rd great-grandparents in the Denamrk census records (1860-1900) and didn't find any of their families for some reason.  I think it may be because the counties they resided in (Tonder and Haderslev) were part of Schleswig-Holstein in Germany from 1867 to 1919.  In the Denmark church records, I found the three Danish surnames and was able to fill out the family group records for them with birth and marriage, and some death, dates.  I added the FamilySearch sources for the events and names.  That was fun. 

6)  I continue to add new persons to my RootsMagic database (notably the Denmark families), and then TreeSharing daily.  After TreeSharing, Ancestry provides Record Hints and I add the event data and source citations to the database, and then TreeShare the changes.  Then I match and update the data to FamilySearch Family Tree.  I only have to touch a new person twice, so that's not too bad. 

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

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Good News for Suffolk County, Massachusetts Researchers

I was happy to see this in an email from the New England Historic Genealogical Society today:


The article said:

"We’re announcing a new database, Suffolk County, MA: Probate File Papers.  This database was created from digital images and index contributed to NEHGS by the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court Archives. It contains the records of 21,387 Suffolk County probate cases filed between 1630 and 1800. The probate cases include wills, guardianships, administrations, and various other types of probate records. The cases range in length from one to over 350 pages, with a total of over 191,600 individual file papers. 
The complete Suffolk County File Papers collection will eventually cover cases 1-94,757, which includes years up to 1893. The cases are indexed chronologically, which allows us to present them in sections while digital photography is taking place. The digital photography is expected to continue through 2020. We will continue to add additional cases as they become available."

 Note that this collection is digitized images of  the actual probate papers that were gathered into probate packets by the Suffolk County, Massachusetts Probate Court, and not the Probate Court clerks transcription of the papers entered into the court clerk volumes which are on FamilySearch (unindexed) and Ancestry.com (poorly indexed). 

I stated today in my blog post (Amanuensis Monday - Probate Records for Estate of John Plimpton (1708-1756) of Medfield, Mass. - Part 4) that I had not found a certain record that distributed the two-thirds of the real estate which would go to the four children of John Plimpton by law.

So I searched on the American Ancestors website for "john plimpton" and found the Suffolk County Probate Records for him in File 11295, and went through the 27 images.  And there was the "missing" page I was seeking:


Very cool!  It even has the actual signature of my 5th great-grandfather, Amos Plimpton!!  I will transcribe it in an upcoming Amanuensis Monday post.  It will have to be Part 3 and a half in the order of the papers.

Now I can use this American Ancestors database for Suffolk County rather than go through the Probate Estate Index and Probate Docket pages on FamilySearch digital microfilm. 

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Disclosure:  I am a paid member of NEHGS since 1994, and use their digital resources frequently.  They are indispensable for New England researchers.

The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Amanuensis Monday - Probate Records for Estate of John Plimpton (1708-1756) of Medfield, Mass. - Part 4

This week's documents for Amanuensis Monday are from the Suffolk County, Massachusetts Probate Court records for John Plimpton (1708-1756) of Medfield, Massachusetts:

a)  Volume 84, page 339 (right-hand page, starting at bottom):


b)  Volume 84, pages 340-341 (left-hand page, continuing at top):

The transcription of this account and distribution of Abigail Clark's estate is:

Volume 84, page 339 (image 186 of 400]

[In right hand margin]

Clark Abigail
Admons Acc^t
18394

[in main body]

To the Hon^ble Oliver Wendell Esq^r Judge of Probate for the County
of Suffolk. The Accounts of Amos Plympton Administrator
on the Estate of the Widow Abigail Clark deceased, Debts and

[Volume 84, page 340 (image 187 of 400]

Charges paid by him and Prays for Allowance as follows.

Paid for Myself & Familys Nursing from Novem^r 5
1784 to February 19^th 1785
£ 12 :  5 :   8
For Necessaries
4 :  5 : 10
For spining & Shoes & other small debts
9 :   1
For Doctoring
6 :   8
To Asa Boyden for Coffin
10 :   4
To Digging the Grave & tolling the Bell
4 :   2
To Probate Office
10 :     
To a Journey to Boston
4 :     
To the Appraisers
1 :   4 :     
To my Attendance & Paper
8 :     
Allowed the Administrator
15 :     
Examining allowing & Recording this Acco^t & Copy
Order of distribution &c
12 :     
Division & Settlement of Real Estate and Copy
16 :     
Inventory and Copy
4 :     
 
£ 19 : 14 :   9
The Accompant charges himself with the
Amount of the Personal Estate the Amount
then being in Specie
£ 35 :   7 :   4

Medfield June 7^th 1785 Amos Plympton

Suffolk Ss: Amos Plympton Adm^or presented the aforegoing
produced Vouchers and was sworn, Examined and allowed
by me this 7^th day of June 1785.
                                                            O. Wendell Jud. Prob.
                              Exam^d: W^m Cooper Reg.

[in left-hand margin]

Clark Abigail's
Am^ors Order of
Distribution
18394

[in main body]

Probate Office }
Suffolk County } By the Hon^ble Oliver Wendell Esq^r Judge of Probate &c.

[Volume 84, page 341 (image 187 of 400]

It appears to me by the Account of Amos Plympton Administrator on
the Estate of Abigail Clark late of Medfield Widow deceased Intestate
that after subduction of necessary Charges & disbursements there will
remain in the Hands of the Administrator a balance of Fifteen
Pounds twelve Shillings & seven pence 1/2 Person Estate which by
Law belongs and is to be distributed as follows viz^t: To Amos Plympton
his Two Shares and to Abner Unity and Olive other Children of the said
deceased the Sum of three Pounds two Shillings & six Pence 1/4 each as their
single Shares in said Estate. I do hereby Order the said Administrat-
or to make distribution accordingly they giving security that in case
debts hereafter appear due from said Estate to refund and pay back to
the Administrator their proportionable part thereof and of his Charges
Given under my Hand and Seal of Office this 7^th Day of June
A.D. 1785.                                                     O. Wendell Jud. Prob.
                                  Exam^d W^m Cooper Reg

The source citation for this document is:

"Suffolk County (Massachusetts) Probate Records, 1636-1899," on 439 FHL US/CAN microfilm reels, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), : accessed 19 October 2017),"Probate records v. 84 1785," FHL US/CAN film 493,890, Volume 84, pages 339-341 (image 186-187 of 400), Abigail Clark estate, account and distribution, 1785; citing original records in the Suffolk County, Mass. courthouse.

John Plimpton (1708-1756) died 8 May 1756, and his widow, Abigail (Fisher) Plimpton, and eldest son, Amos Plimpton, were appointed administrators of his intestate estate on 2 July 1756.

In Part 1, three appraisers were appointed to make a true and just inventory of the estate, which they did on 20 October 1656.  The estate was valued by the appraisers at £375 : 4s : 3d.  It included real estate valued at £ 264 : 16s.   The personal estate was £ 110 : 8s : 3d.

In Part 2, the administrators, widow Abigail Plimpton and son Amos Plimpton, declared their account, which totaled £70 : 4s, on 22 October 1758.  This included fees and charges for the probate court documents, notes and money owed to creditors.  

In Part 3, the appraisers divided the real property and set off one third of it to the widow, Abigail (Fisher) Plimpton.  They appraised the remaining two thirds of the real property at £189 2s 8d.  However, they did not divide the property between the children of John and Abigail Plimpton because it would "prejudice" the division.  

There must be a division and distribution in another record (not available) of the two thirds of the real estate between the four children, with eldest son Amos Plimpton receiving a double share, and being awarded all of the land, on the condition that he pay the other three children (Abner, Unity and Olive) their share of the value of the two thirds of the real estate.  

In these documents, the widow Abigail (Fisher) (Plimpton) Clark (who married David Clark in 1770, but became a widow again in 1771) has died in 1785, and this is the account and distribution of her personal property to her four children (Abigail Clark has her own probate packet in the Suffolk County Probate Records, number 18294).  The administrator is the son Amos Plimpton, and he again provides an account, charges himself with the personal property at hand, and the court distributes the remainder of the funds to the four children.  Note that this occurs 29 years after John Plimpton has died.  

There will be one more post for this set of estate records, with the division and distribution of the real estate granted to Abigail (Fisher) (Plimpton) Clark for her use in the Part 3.

John and Abigail (Fisher) Plimpton are my 6th great-grandparents, through their son, Amos Plimpton (1735-1808), who married Mary Guild (1735-1800) in 1756.

Note that these records are on FHL Microfilm, and are on FHL digital microfilm on FamilySearch.org, but they are not indexed.  The Suffolk County Probate Packets have not been filmed to my knowledge,so I used the Suffolk County Probate Court Clerk volumes because I found them first.  A researcher has to search the Probate Index for the person's probate packet number, then find the Probate Docket files with the list of papers that are in the probate packet, along with the volume and page numbers, and then find the individual volumes and pages with the documents listed in the Probate Docket.

This set of court clerk volume records are not indexed on Ancestry.com in the "Massachusetts, Will and Probate Records, 1635-1991" collection They are available in the Ancestry collection, but you have to use the Probate Index and Probate Docket files to find the volumes and page numbers (similar to the process on FamilySearch).  They just are not indexed with the correct decedent's name.


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NOTE:  Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/11/amanuensis-monday-probate-records-for_20.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Sunday, November 19, 2017

Added or Updated Record Collections at FamilySearch.org - Week of 12 to 18 November 2017

I am trying to keep up with the new and updated record collections at FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list) every week.

As of 18 November 2017, there were 2,274 record collections on FamilySearch (an increase of 7 from last week):


The added or updated collections are (as Marshall provided them):

--- Collections Added   ---


*  Denmark Census, 1855    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2778654); 1,733,541 indexed records with 1,733,541 record images, ADDED 17 Nov 2017

*  Denmark Census, 1845    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2778652); 1,671,252 indexed records with 1,671,252 record images, ADDED 17 Nov 2017

*  Denmark Census, 1850    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2778653); 1,301,602 indexed records with 1,301,602 record images, ADDED 17 Nov 2017

*  Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Public Records   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2821274); 3,011,381 indexed records with 3,011,381 record images, ADDED 11 Nov 2017

*  Uruguay, Civil Registration Index Card, 1900-1937       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1976089); 2,233,093 indexed records with 2,233,093 record images, ADDED 14 Nov 2017

*  Denmark Census, 1840    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2778651); 1,611,062 indexed records with 1,611,062 record images, ADDED 17 Nov 2017

*  Denmark Census, 1835    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2771434); 282,207 indexed records with 282,207 record images, ADDED 17 Nov 2017

--- Collections Updated ---

*  Italy, Padova, Civil Registration (State Archive), 1621-1936    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2120751); 43,158 indexed records with 43,928 record images (was 43,158 records with 43,028 images), Updated 16 Nov 2017

*  Great Britain, War Office Registers, 1772-1935  (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2366620); 21,846 indexed records with 3,617 record images (was 204 records with 3,617 images), Updated 13 Nov 2017

*  Alabama County Marriages, 1809-1950     (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1743384); 2,033,505 indexed records with 1,231,203 record images (was 2,050,570 records with 1,231,203 images), Updated 13 Nov 2017

*  Denmark Census, 1925    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2718007); 3,627,893 indexed records with 822,303 record images (was 3,627,893 records with 887 images), Updated 15 Nov 2017

*  Brazil, PiauĂ­, Civil Registration, 1875-2014    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2001150); 1,811,273 indexed records with 1,295,575 record images (was 1,604,454 records with 1,295,575 images), Updated 16 Nov 2017

*  Portugal, Coimbra, Civil Registration, 1893-1980        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2014773); 66,833 indexed records with 31,200 record images (was 13,654 records with 31,200 images), Updated 13 Nov 2017

*  Netherlands, Archival Indexes, Vital Records    (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2704829); 36,643,950 indexed records with 36,643,950 record images (was 36,643,950 records with 36,643,950 images), Updated 14 Nov 2017

*  New Jersey State Census, 1895   (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2659407); 1,484,097 indexed records with 31,123 record images (was 1,484,097 records with 31,123 images), Updated 17 Nov 2017

*  Peru, Cusco, Civil Registration, 1889-1997      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1987564); 750,899 indexed records with 942,817 record images (was 651,675 records with 942,817 images), Updated 15 Nov 2017

--- Collections with records removed ---

*  United States, GenealogyBank Obituaries, 1980-2014      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2333694); 34,168,493 indexed records with 45,512,634 record images (was 34,168,494 records with 45,512,634 images),  17 Nov 2016

*  United States Public Records, 1970-2009 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2199956); Index only (875,611,161 records), no images (was 875,611,174 records with 0 images),  17 Jun 2015

*  Minnesota Birth Index, 1935-2002        (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1949334); Index only (4,267,597 records), no images (was 4,267,598 records with 0 images),  6 May 2014

*  Philippines, Manila, Civil Registration, 1899-1984      (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1686086); 2,847,719 indexed records with 5,857,674 record images (was 2,847,720 records with 5,857,674 images),  6 Jan 2017

*  Peru, Lima, Civil Registration, 1874-1996       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/1430936); 1,967,701 indexed records with 3,505,112 record images (was 1,967,702 records with 3,505,112 images),  18 May 2017

*  California Birth Index, 1905-1995       (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/2001879); Index only (24,589,533 records), no images (was 24,589,549 records with 0 images),  1 Mar 2012

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It was a good week  for Denmark researchers - there are several new census collections.

The over 31 million indexed 1930 U.S. Census entries that disappeared five weeks ago are still not in the collection.  

In order to select a specific record collection on FamilySearch, go to  https://familysearch.org/search/collection/list and use the "Filter by collection name" feature in the upper left-hand corner.

My friend, Marshall, has come up with a way to determine which collections are ADDED, DELETED or UPDATED.  Thanks to Marshall for helping me out here!

Each one of the collections listed above has a Research Wiki page (use the "Learn more" link).  It would be very useful if the Wiki page for each collection listed the dates for when the collection was added as a new collection and the dates for major updates also.

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Added or Updated Ancestry.com Databases - Week of 12 to 18 November 2017

The following databases were listed on the Recently Added or Updated Collections list on Ancestry.com during the period from 12 to 18 November 2017 


The databases added or updated include:

The chart above is exactly the same as the corresponding chart last week.  No databases ADDED or Updated.  Perhaps Ancestry forgot to change their "New and Updated" page?  I checked the Card Catalog and there is nothing added or updated there since last week.


The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at   http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx 

By my count, there were 0 NEW databases ADDED this past week, per the list above.  There are now 32,874 databases available as of 18 November, a decrease of  4 from last week.  That indicates that 4 databases were eliminated last week for some reason.

                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have always had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Best of the Genea-Blogs - 12 to 18 November 2017

Dozens of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.


My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.


Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


How to Find Compiled Military Service Records for Your Ancestors by Michael Strauss on Lisa Louise Cooke's Genealogy Gems blog.

*  Crisps Fragmenta Genealogica – Genealogy Problem Solver by Linda Elliott on the Mad About Genealogy blog.

Along the Pilgrim Trail ~ Francis Eaton of Bristol, England~ James Chilton and Canterbury, Kent, England; ~ Fishtoft, Lincolnshire, Where the Pilgrim Fathers Were Betrayed~ Boston, Lincolnshire, Where the Pilgrim Fathers Were Jailed by Heather Wilkinson Rojo on the Nutfield Genealogy blog.

*  Genealogy 101: Genealogy Isn’t Just About Ancestors – Finding the Living by Gena Philibert-Ortega on the GenealogyBank Blog.

*  Making Sense of Your Matches on Ancestry by Donna Moughty on Donna's Irish Genealogy Resources blog.

*  FTDNA’s 13th IGG Conference Lab Tour by Louis Kessler on Louis Kessler's Behold Genealogy blog.

Thither FHISO by Tony Proctor on the Parallax View blog.

*  Introducing We Remember – Free Online Memorials by the Ancestry Team on the Ancestry.com Blog.

*  Loose Marriage Records....What Are They? by Melissa Barker on the A Genealogist in the Archives blog.

DNA Testing Advice by Dave Robison on the Old Bones Genealogy of New England blog.

*  A Story in Captions: The 1913 Gettysburg Reunion by Laura Hedgecock on the Treasure Chest of Memories blog.

*  Findagrave New and Fairly Workable by Margaret H on the My Family History Hat blog.

The Price of Access by Judy G. Russell on The Legal Genealogist blog.

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Friday Fossicking - 17th November 2017 by Crissouli on the That Moment In Time blog.

 Friday's Family History Finds by Linda Stufflebean on the Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog.

 Friday Finds, 17 Nov 2017 by Lois Willis on the Lois Willis - Genealogy and Family History blog.

*  Friday Finds 17 Nov 2017 by Nichelle Barra on the Copper Leaf Genealogy blog.

*  Friday Finds: Week 46 - 2017 by Martin Roe Eidhammer on the Norwegian Genealogy and then someblog.


This Week's Creme de la Creme -- November 18, 2017 by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.

Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I am currently reading posts from over 900 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.



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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/11/best-of-genea-blogs-12-to-18-november.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Saturday, November 18, 2017

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun -- Expanded "Ancestors Geneameme"

It's Saturday Night - 
time for more Genealogy Fun! 



Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:



1)  Jill Ball created a 40 question "Ancestors Geneameme" in 2011, and Linda Stufflebean recently expanded it to 70 questions on her Empty Branches on the Family Tree blog.  

2)  Let's do Linda's expanded list this week for SNGF.

3)  Copy and paste the list of questions below and replace my answers with your own.

4)  Share your answers as a comment on this b;og post, in your own blog post, or on Facebook or Google+.   Please leave a comment and al ink to your answer in a comment on this blog post.

Here's mine:

  1. Can name my 16 great-great grandparents.   YES
  2. Can name my 32 great great great grandparents   YES
  3. Can name over 50 direct ancestors  YES
  4. Have photos or portraits of my 8 great grandparents  YES
  5. Have an ancestor who was married more than three times YES
  6. Have an ancestor who was a bigamist   NO, not that I know of
  7. Met all four of my grandparents  NO, not my paternal grandfather
  8. Met one or more of my great grandparents  YES
  9. Bear an ancestor’s given name/s  NO
  10. Named a child after an ancestor  NO
  11. Have an ancestor from Great Britain or Ireland  YES
  12. Have an ancestor from Asia  NO
  13. Have an ancestor from continental Europe   YES
  14. Have an ancestor from Africa  NO, except from 50,000 years ago
  15. Have an ancestor who was an agricultural laborer  YES
  16. Have an ancestor who had large land holdings   YES
  17. Have an ancestor who was a holy man – minister, priest, rabbi   YES
  18. Have an ancestor who was a midwife  NO, don't know for sure
  19. Have an ancestor who was an author    NO
  20. Have an ancestor with the surname Wong, Kim, Suzuki or Ng    NO
  21. Have an ancestor with the surname Smith, Murphy or Jones   YES
  22. Have an ancestor with a surname beginning with X  NO
  23. Have an ancestor with a forename beginning with Z  NO
  24. Have an ancestor born on 25th December  YES
  25. Have an ancestor born on New Year’s Day   YES
  26. Have an ancestor who shares your day and month of birth  NO
  27. Have blue blood in your family lines  YES, have Royals in England
  28. Have a parent who was born in a country different from my country of birth    NO
  29. Have a grandparent who was born in a country different from my country of birth  NO
  30. Can trace a direct family line back to the 18th century  YES
  31. Can trace a direct family line back to the 17th century  YES
  32. Can trace a direct family line back to the 16th century  YES
  33. Have seen signatures of some of my great grandparents  YES
  34. Have ancestors who signed with an X (or other mark)  YES
  35. Have a grandparent or earlier ancestor who went to university   NO 
  36. Have an ancestor convicted of a criminal offense    NO, don't know for sure
  37. Have an ancestor who was a victim of crime  NO, don't know for sure
  38. Have shared an ancestor’s story online or in a magazine/periodical  YES
  39. Have published a family history online or in print  YES
  40. Have visited an ancestor’s home from the 19th or earlier centuries  YES
  41. Have a family Bible from the 19th century  YES
  42. Have a family Bible from the 18th century or earlier  NO
  43. Have an ancestor who was part of a multiple birth (twins, etc.)  YES
  44. Have a family member who closely resembles an ancestor  NO, don't know for sure
  45. Have an ancestor who owned their own business  YES
  46. Have an ancestor who belonged to a trade guild  NO
  47. Have an ancestor who moved more than 100 miles away from his/her birth home, EXCLUDING emigration to another country  YES
  48. Have an ancestor who gave birth to twelve or more children  YES
  49. Have an ancestor with a rare/unusual/uncommon forename  YES
  50. Have an ancestral family who changed their surname  NO, don't know for sure
  51. Have a passenger list or travel manifest for an ancestor  YES
  52. Have an ancestor who was adopted  YES
  53. Have an ancestor who adopted a child   NO, don't know for sure
  54. Have a naturalization record for an ancestor  YES
  55. Have an ancestor who received a military pension  YES
  56. Have a school record or school census for an ancestor  YES
  57. Have an ancestor with a gravestone still in existence from the 18th century  YES
  58. Have an ancestor with a gravestone still in existence from the 17th century or earlier  YES
  59. Have an ancestor who had only one child who survived to adulthood  YES
  60. Are descended twice from one couple  YES
  61. Are descended three times or more from one couple  YES
  62. Are descended from an American president or other political figure  YES (Mass. colonial governor)
  63. Are descended from a person famous in history, other than in politics  YES
  64. Have an ancestor with a rare/unusual/unique surname  YES (Pickle? Sovereign? Bucket?)
  65. Have an ancestor who you have found mentioned in a pre-1870 newspaper  YES
  66. Can name the ship on which at least one ancestor emigrated  YES
  67. Have a female ancestor who worked outside the home pre-World War II  YES
  68. Know of at least one ancestor who returned to the ancestral home after emigration  YES
  69. Know of at least one ancestor who permanently returned to the ancestral home after emigration   YES, one died and buried after returning home
  70. Have an ancestor who was survived by 50 or more grandchildren  YES
So I have 48 YES out of 70.

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

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