Tuesday, September 23, 2014

Technology Tuesday - MyHeritage Mobile App - Family Tree

MyHeritage recently updated its mobile app for the iOS devices - see the MyHeritage Blog post at  http://blog.myheritage.com/2014/07/major-update-of-the-myheritage-mobile-app/.  There are frequently asked questions about the mobile app at  http://www.myheritage.com/help/topics/myheritage-mobile-app/.

The mobile app is FREE from the App Store on the iOS products, and from Google Play for Android products.  A user must have a MyHeritage account and a family tree on MyHeritage in order to use the mobile app to its fullest potential.  

1)  The opening screen of the MyHeritage mobile app  on my iPhone looks like this:


There are three major sections for this app - Family Tree, Research, and Family Photos.  I will look at all three in this series.

2)  For this blog post, I'm going to review the "Family Tree" section of the MyHeritage mobile app.

When I tap on the right arrow on the screen above for "Family Tree," the screen shows the persons in my MyHeritage family tree:


The screen above shows an extensive family view - I'm in the middle with my descendants below, and my ancestors above.  If I want to see the family of, say, my wife, I can tap on the small blue and pink bubbles above her name and the tree will adjust to show her ancestors and descendants.  If I want to add a family member, I can tap on the plus (+) sign below the person's blue or pink icon to add another family member.

Flicking the screen expands the view (makes the icons larger) or pinching the screen makes the icons smaller.

3)  To see information about a person, I can tap on their icon (the blue or pink box, with the photo, name, lifespan years).  I chose to see the information about my paternal grandmother, Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962):


There are four buttons at the bottom of the screen - for Information, Events, Family, and Photographs.

4)  A user can Edit the information about the person by tapping the "Edit" button on the screen above.  That opens the "Edit Info" screen and the user can edit or add information about the person by picking one of the items with a right arrow:


note that an edit or addition made on the mobile app will be reflected in the user's family tree on the MyHeritage website.  And vice versa - a change to information on the website will be reflected on the mobile app.

To get back to the "Info" screen, the user needs to tap the "Done" button.

5)  I tapped on the "Events" icon (on the bottom of the screen), and the list of Events in the life of the person appeared (two screens shown below):



In addition to the life events for my grandmother, the significant events (birth, marriage and death of spouses and children) in her lifetime are listed.

A user can add or edit Event items by tapping on the "Edit" button at the top of the screen.

6)  The "Family" button on the bottom of the screen provides a list of parents, siblings, spouses and children of the person:


The user can navigate to any of these persons by tapping the name of the family member.  A family member can be added by tapping the "Edit" button.

7)  Tapping the "Photo" button (on the bottom of the screen) shows all of the photographs and attached record images for the person:



I have attached only one photograph for my grandmother.  If I tap the photo, then I can see it full screen.


Tapping on the three dots at the bottom of the screen above permits me to "Save to library" or "Remove current photo."

8)  The MyHeritage mobile app for iOS is very useful - it's my family tree in my pocket.  I can refer to it for information about the person in my family tree.  

I didn't see any way to see person notes, or source citations, using this mobile app.  I could see, or add, Event notes if I edited the Event.

I will review the "Research" feature in the MyHeritage mobile app in the next Technology Tuesday post.

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Monday, September 22, 2014

Crafting a Source Citation for a Digital Book in Family Tree Maker 2014

After I wrote Crafting a Source Citation for a Published Book and a Google Book Version of the Book, which used RootsMagic 6, I received a comment in email to the effect of "Can you show me how to do this in Family Tree Maker 2014?"

Of course I can - but the process is different, and the resulting source citation is somewhat different using source templates in Family Tree Maker 2014.  Here's the process:

1)  In the "People" workspace, and a Person profile, I highlighted the Birth Fact:


On the screen above, with the "Sources" tab selected in the right-hand column, I clicked on the "New" button and selected "Add New Source Citation."

2)  The "Add Source Citation for Birth of ..." screen opened.  I did not have this digital book already in my list of sources, so I clicked on the "New" button:


That opened the "Add Source" screen above, and I selected the "New" button on that screen to open the "Select Source Template" screen as shown above.

I selected a Source group of "Publications -- Books, CDs, DVDs, Maps, Leaflets, and Videos," then selected a Category of "Image Copies" from the dropdown menu and "Online Publication (by Author" on the Template dropdown menu.

3)  Clicking "OK" opened the "Edit source" screen and I entered the source information into the different fields:



The fields are:

*  Author surname:  Cutter
*  Author forename(s):  William R.
*  Author credentials: [blank]
*  Other authors:  et al (editors)
*  Title:  Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV
*  Original publication year:  New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911
*  New format:  Digital image
*  Website title:  Google
*  URL:  http://books.google.com
*  Year:  [blank]
*  Comments:  [blank]

4)  After clicking the "OK" button, the "Add Source citation for Birth of ..." screen opened, and on the "source" tab I entered the "Citation detail" information:


I added:

*  Citation detail:  in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth
*  Citation text:  "(VI) Simon (3), son of Simon (2) Wade, was born November 22, 1767. He married, before 1790, Phebe Horton, born May 7, 1772, and lived at Foster.  Children:  James, born December 10, 1791; Catharine October 12, 1793: Sarah, October 23, 1798; Arnold, June 26, 1800; Olive, September 23, 1802; Miranda, June 25, 1804; Fenner, March 30, 1807; Lawton, mentioned below."
*  I unchecked the boxes to include the Citation text and the Web address.

5)  When I was finished, I clicked on the "Reference Note" tab to see the source citation created by this process:


The resulting source citation looks like this:

William R. Cutter, et al (editors), Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911), in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth; digital image, Google (http://books.google.com).

6)  As you can see, this has all of the elements of the source citation that was created using RootsMagic 6, but there are some differences.  Here is the source citation crafted by RootsMagic 6:

William R. Cutter et al, editors, Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y.: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911), in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth; digital image, Google, Google Books  (http://books.google.com : accessed 19 September 2014).

7)  The differences appear to be:

*  Family Tree Maker 2014 doesn't use italics for book titles or website names
*  Family Tree Maker does not add an access date field.
*  FTM asked only for the Website title, not the Website company name.  I could have used "Google Books" instead of "Google."
*  I put all of the standard publication information in the field for "Digital Publication Year" because I thought it was necessary.  

Those are fairly minor differences, and a reader could easily find the book page in question with the information provided.  

The URL for this post is:

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


CVGS Program on 9/24 is Ceasar Castro on Mexican-American War

WEDNESDAY, September 24th PROGRAM MEETING
from 12 noon to 2 p.m.
At Chula Vista Civic Center Branch Library Auditorium

Ceasar Castro – “California and the Mexican-American War
from a Genealogical Point of View– Part 2”

Ceasar Castro is a local boy. He graduated from Hilltop High School and San Diego State with a degree in Electrical Engineering.  He worked at the Navy R&D Laboratory on Point Loma for 36 years before retiring.



Ceasar started working on his genealogy in 2008 when his sister, who had started earlier, asked him for help. However, slowly he took over the research. He joined the San Diego Genealogy Society and the Chula Vista Genealogy Society to learn more about genealogy. All of his ancestors come from Baja California. In researching his Castro ancestors, he discovered that two of his great-grandaunts married Irishmen in Baja. This puzzled him - how did the Irishmen end up in Baja around 1850? This started him delving into the history of Baja and resulted in his research on the Mexican-American War.

When historians write about history, they are interested in who made decisions and the result of those decisions. If an army is involved, they may give the names of some of the officers but not of the common soldiers. They usually only give the number of soldiers. But we are  genealogists; we seek the names of all the soldiers. That is because we are usually looking for a particular person(s). This presentation on the Mexican-American War is from that perspective; what were the names of all the people involved in the Mexican-American War in California.

This presentation is a continuation from the February 2014 presentation, and will concentrate on activities in San Diego County.


The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/cvgs-program-on-924-is-ceasar-castro-on.html


Geni.com Now Supports Multi-Lingual Profiles

I just received this via email from Amanda at Geni.com:

==================================

We're excited to let you know that Geni.com now supports multilingual profiles. This means you can enter names and biographies in multiple languages, and Geni will store them separately, and display them in your preferred language. The World Family Tree is a global initiative by Geni.com that shows how everyone in the world is related. As the leading global family tree, Geni's World Family Tree is now nearly 80 million profiles strong. One of the greatest challenges of building the definitive family tree of the world is accommodating the multitude of languages spoken by our international community. With branches extending all around the globe, Geni profiles are now multilingual and users can enter profile names and biographies separately in any of the 75 languages that are actively used on Geni. 

Now everyone can enjoy this rich content in their native language, without having to scroll through the similar information in foreign languages or see a messy mix of names in various languages on their relatives' profiles. Names can be entered in any language on any profile, and through a clever system of fallbacks, only the best information available will be displayed. We've updated all of Geni's functionality to take advantage of this new feature, including searching, tree matching, family charts, data exports and more.

Please read the announcement on our blog for further details: http://www.geni.com/blog/new-on-geni-multilingual-profiles-386125.html

================================

The blog post has a number of excellent examples.  Here is the Geni.com profile for Charlemagne in English:

I tried to figure out how to see this profile in German, but I couldn't figure out how to do it, except to change the language in my settings, which didn't change it to look like what I saw in the blog post.   Perhaps I'm just dense - I figured that if I chose German from the dropdown list that it would translate the profiles into German.  



Amanuensis Monday - Post 236: 1869 Deed of Land in Taylor County, Iowa from Esther and John Craven to Ranslow Smith

Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 

"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The subject today is an 1869 deed in the Taylor County, Iowa deed books for Esther and John Craven selling land to Ranslow Smith:



The transcription of this deed is (handwritten text in italics, form fields underlined):

01 Esther & John Craven to Ranslow Smith
2h Claim [in margin]
02 Know all men by these presents. That we Esther M. Cravens
03 & John Cravens of the County of Taylor and State
04 of Iowa for the Consideration of Five Hundred Dollars
05 in hand paid do hereby Quit Claim unto Ranslow
06 Smith of Taylor County State of Iowa all right title
07 and interest in and to the following described Real Estate
08 Viz.  The West half 1/2 of the North East quarter 1//4 of Section
09 Seventeen (17) Tp Sixty nine (69) North of Range 34 West.
10   And the Said John Craven Releases his right of dower
11 in and to the above described premises.
12   Witness our hands this the 15" day of Sept. A.D. 1869.
13                                 {  50             50  }   Esther M. Craven
14                                 {  Rev Stamp      }   John S. Craven
15 State of Iowa   }
16 Taylor County } SS
17                                On this 15" day of Sept. A.D. 1869, before
18  Me the undersigned a Notary Public in and for said
19 County appeared the above named Esther M. Craven & John
20 Craven personally Known to me to be the identical persons
21 whose names are affixed to the foregoing instrument as grantors
22 and acknowledged the same to be their voluntary act and deed
23 for the purposes therein expressed.
24                           In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand
25 {  Notarial }                                         L. J. McCoun
26 {     Seal    }                                            Notary Public
27 I certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the Original
28 Deed as filed for Record Sept 23^d 1869
29                                           James P. Flick
30                                                     Recorder

The source citation for this Deed is:

Taylor County, Iowa, "Taylor County, Iowa, deed records, 1855-1953; index, 1855-1902", "Deed Records (Land) v. J (cont.) 1867-1869 v. K-L 1867-1870," Volume L, page 212 (stamped), Deed of Esther and John Craven to Ranslow Smith, 1869; accessed 4 February 2014 on FHL US/CAN microfilm 1,535,633.

This is the second parcel of land that John and Esther Craven sold to Ranslow Smith on 15 September 1869.  I thought it was interesting that John Craven released his dower right to this land parcel.  I think that means that this land came to Esther Craven, perhaps by deed or inheritance.

Ranslow Smith (1805-1873) is the adoptive father of my second great-grandfather, Devier J. Lamphier Smith (1839-1894).  He married Julia (Middleton) Johnston, as his second wife, on 8 March 1868 in Taylor County, Iowa.


Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver

Sunday, September 21, 2014

Best of the Genea-Blogs - 14 to 20 September 2014

Hundreds of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.


My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.

Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


*  What to Cite First: The Chicken or the Egg? by Elizabeth Shown Mills on the Evidence Explained QuickTips blog.  ESM argues that we should be citing the source that we used.

*  When the Genealogists Come to Town by Susan Petersen on the Long Lost Relatives.net blog.  Susan enjoys meeting other genealogists and she's well-positioned on I-80 in Omaha.

*  Blogging Your Family History by Lynn Palermo on The Armchair Genealogist blog.  Lynn summarizes reasons and how to blog.

*  Extracting Data From a Biographical Sketch - Part 1 by Wendy Littrell on the All My Branches Genealogy blog.  Wendy does a fine job of digging out every bit of information from a sketch.

*  DNA 101: The Secret's in the Science by CeCe Moore on the Finding Your Roots blog.  CeCe is the genetic genealogist for this PBS show, and summarizes her experiences.

*  What If Someone Asked For Your Best Genealogy Advice? (My Top Tips) by Diane Haddad on the Genealogy Insider blog.  Diane has excellent tips here.

*  Orphans and Orphan Trains by James Tanner on the Genealogy's Star blog.  James provides links to useful information about orphan trains.

*  Help!  Where Are My Ancestor's Newspaper Articles?  by Kenneth R. Marks on The Ancestor Hunt blog.  Kenneth provides ideas for determining locations where they might be.

*  Wednesday Spotlight:  Genedocs Founder, Eric R. Jelle by Tami Mize on the WikiChicks blog.  Eric's interview is interesting, and so are his charts.

*  Finding It In the Stacks by Jacqi Stevens on A Family Tapestry blog.  Jacqi highlights what can not be found online, and found a library in Ireland to visit near her ancestor's homes.

*  Looking for Mable and Welcome Home, Mable! Lost But Now Found by Lorine McGinnis Schulze on the Olive Tree Genealogy Blog.  Lorine 's husband had a stunning portrait of a young woman, and Lorine and her readers identified her quickly.  Good work!

These genea-bloggers wrote weekly pick posts and news summary posts this week:

*  WikiWeek in Review: 15 September 2014 by Eowyn Langholf on the WikiTree Blog.

*  Whaddya Miss? Tuesday, Sept. 16 2014; Wednesday, Sept. 17, 2014; Thursday, Sept. 18, 2014; by Tami Mize on the WikiChicks blog.

*  What We Are Reading: September 19th Edition by Amy Johnson Crow on the Ancestry.com Blog.

*  Friday Finds and Follows: 19 September 2014 by Miriam J. Robbins on the Ancestories: The Stories of My Ancestors blog.

*  Follow Friday ~ Fab Finds for September 19, 2014 by Jana Last on Jana's Genealogy and Family History Blog.

*  Genealogy News Corral: Sept. 15-19 by Diane Haddad on the Genealogy Insider blog.

*  Blog Posts and News Stories for Genealogists, September 19, 2014 by Michael J. Leclerc on the Mocavo Genealogy Blog.

*  This Week's Creme de la Creme by Gail Dever on the Genealogy a la Carte blog.

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.

Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I am currently reading posts from over 1540 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


The URL for this post is:  
http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/best-of-genea-blogs-14-to-20-september.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver 




Saturday, September 20, 2014

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Do/Did Your Children Know Their Great-Grandparents?

Calling all Genea-Musings Fans: 
 It's Saturday Night again - 
time for some more Genealogy Fun!!



Here is your assignment if you choose to play along (cue the Mission Impossible music):



1)  Dana Leeds on the Enthusiastic Genealogist blog asks "Did/Do Your Children Know Any of Their Great-Grandparents?"

2)  I thought that would be a great Saturday Night Genealogy Fun question - so please share your response with us in a blog post of your own, in a comment on this blog post, or in a Facebook or Google+ post.

3)  For extra credit, or in case the answer is "No," then please answer the question for yourself, or your parents.

Here's mine:

1)  My children were born in 1974 and 1976, so they did not meet their paternal paternal great-grandparents, Frederick and Alma Bessie (Richmond) Seaver, who died in 1942 and 1962.  They did meet their paternal maternal great-grandparents, Lyle and Emily (Auble) Carringer who died in 1976 and 1977, respectively.   They did not meet their maternal paternal great-grandparents - Severt and Amelia (Brocke) Leland (who died in 1940 and 1974), or their maternal maternal great-grandfather, Paul Schaffner (who died in 1934) but my oldest daughter met her great-grandmother Edna (McKnew) Schaffner (who died in late 1974) once.  We have a picture of the four generations.

2)  For myself, I was born in 1943, and so I did not meet any of my paternal great-grandparents, Frank W. and Hattie (Hildreth) Seaver, who died in 1922 and 1920, nor Thomas and Julia (White) Richmond, who died in 1917 and 1913.  I did meet three of my four maternal great-grandparents, since Henry Austin and Della (Smith) Carringer died in 1946 and 1944, and Georgianna (Kemp) Auble died in 1952, but her husband Charles Auble died in 1916.  

The only one I recall is Georgianna (Kemp) Auble, who lived with my grandparents.  She was warm and sweet, and we called her Nana (which is what my mother called her).  

I would love to have been able to talk to Georgianna about genealogy and family history, since she was born in Ontario, moved to Chicago and married, and came to San Diego in about 1911.  Of course, I would love to talk again to any of them about their life experiences and family memories, but that isn't going to happen, is it?

To summarize, one of my children met three of their great-grandparents, and one of them met two.  I met three of my great-grandparents.  

3)  An additional thought:  My two grandsons know two of their great-grandparents, although one has died recently.  They will have very fond and happy memories of their Gi-gi-ma!  My two granddaughters knew one of their great-grandparents, who has since died.

Thank you, Dana, for your blog post that led to my SNGF post!

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-dodid-your.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Surname Saturday - BEMIS (England to colonial Massachusetts)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am in the 8th great-grandmothers and I'm up to Ancestor #1043 who is Mary BEMIS (1624-1695) 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 8th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts].

My ancestral line back through two generations in this BEMIS family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

64. Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816)
65. Martha Whitney (1764-1832)


130.  Samuel Whitney (1719-1782)
131.  Abigail Fletcher (1720-1783)

260.  William Whitney (1683-1720)
261.  Martha Pierce (1681-1759)

520.  Nathaniel Whitney (1647-1733)
521.  Sarah Hagar (1651-1722)


1042.  William Hagar, born about 1620 in probably Nazeing, Essex, England; died 10 January 1684 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He married 20 March 1645 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
1043.  Mary Bemis, born before 10 September 1624 in Dedham, Essex, England; died December 1695 in Watertown, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  

Children of William Hagar and Mary Bemis are:
*  Mary Hagar (1645-????)
*  Ruhamah Hagar (1647-1738), married 1675 Joseph Waite (1643-1722).
*  Samuel Hagar (1647-1704), married 1679 Sarah Mixer (1657-1745).
*  Hannah Hagar (1649-1702), married 1674 Joseph Priest (1650-1697).
*  Sarah Hagar (1651-1722), married 1674 Nathaniel Whitney (1647-1733).
*  Susannah Hagar (1653-1731), married 1680 Joseph Grout (1649-1702).
*  William Hagar (1659-1734), married 1687 Sarah Benjamin (1663-1745).
*  Rebecca Hagar (1661-1735), married 1681 Nathaniel Healey (1659-1734).
*  Abigail Hagar (1663-????), married 1687 Benjamin Whitney (1660-1736).
*  Mehitabel Hagar (1665-1691), married 1687 Nathaniel Norcross (1665-1717).

2086.  John Bemis, born about 1589 in Dedham, Essex, England; died before 26 June 1624 in Dedham, Essex, England.  He married 1614 in Dedham, Essex, England.
2087.  Anne Spray, born about 1593 in Dedham, Essex, England.

Children of John Bemis and Anne Spray are:

*  Isaac Bemis (1615-????)
*  Luke Bemis (1617-????)
*  Joseph Bemis (1619-1684), married 1640 Sarah Capron (1621-1712).
*  Abraham Bemis (1621-????).
*  Mary Bemis (1624-1695), married 1645 William Hagar (1620-1684).
*  James Bemis (1626-1665).
*  Susan Bemis (1628-????).

Information about the Bemis family in America can be found in:

Colonel Thomas Waln-Morgan Draper, The Bemis History and Genealogy (San Francisco, Calif. : Stanley-Taylor Co., Printers, 1900).

The English Bemis family was, apparently, gleaned from an online family tree.

The URL for this post is: http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/surname-saturday-bemis-england-to.html

copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


Friday, September 19, 2014

Crafting a Source Citation for a Published Book and a Google Book Version of the Book

When I was writing my 52 Ancestors post this morning, I noticed that I needed to "improve" my source citation for the birth of Miranda (Wade) White.  The only birth record I had was from the book:

William R. Cutter, et al (editors), Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911).

I found this book on the shelf at a local library (and I don't recall which one!) back in the 1990 time frame and I made a photocopy of the Wade sketch that had her name.  However, I had not transcribed the information - I had only entered it into my genealogy database directly from the photocopy of the pages.

In my RootsMagic file, I had made a free-form source citation for this on-the-shelf item, with the template looking like this:


The source citation for the birth information in the published book is:

Footnote: William R. Cutter, et al (editors) Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911), in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth.

Short Footnote: Cutter, Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut, in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth.

Bibliography: Cutter, William R. Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut. New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911.

Since this book was published in 1911, I figured that it was online at Google Books, so I did a search for [ cutter genealogies connecticut miranda wade ] to see if I could find it without digging through my bookcases and then scanning the pages.

It was one of the first matches, and I clicked on it and page 2125 with Miranda's name opened:




To cite this book found on Google Books, I needed to add the book publication information plus the Google information.  To get the book publication information, I clicked on the link for "About this book" in the left-hand column.  Here is the publication information about the book:


I copied and pasted most of the information into the source template for "Book, image copy (online)" in RootsMagic 6, and then added the Google information and the source detail information:


Note that I didn't put all of the authors names, I substituted "et al" for them.  

The resulting source citation for the Google Book copy of the published book is:

Footnote: William R. Cutter et al, editors, Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y.: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911), in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth; digital images, Google, Google Books (http://books.google.com : accessed 19 September 2014).

Short Footnote: Cutter, Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut, in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth.

Bibliography: Cutter, William R. et al, editors. Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation. Volume IV. New York, N.Y.: Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911. Digital images. Google. Google Books. http://books.google.com : 2014.

As you can see, the only significant difference is the added "layer" of the Google information.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/crafting-source-citation-for-published.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver


"Genealogy Rockstar" Poll Results

Genea-blogger John D. Reid, who writes the excellent Canada's Anglo-Celtic Connections blog, ran a poll last week to determine the "Genealogy Rockstars" in a number of categories.  The vote was taken over a one-week time, and closed last weekend.


Here are links to the Top Ten "Genealogy Rockstars" in the different categories, as voted by those who identify themselves as living in the country or region, or as genetic genealogsts:

*  International Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Judy G. Russell

*  USA Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Judy G. Russell

*  Commonwealth Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Janet Few

*  England/Scotland/Wales Rockstar Genealogists for 2014 -- #1 is Janet Few

*  Ireland Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Steven C. Smyrl

*  Canada Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Dick Eastman

* Australia/New Zealand Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Shauna Hicks

*  DNA Rockstar Genealogists - #1 is Roberta Estes

*  Rockstar Genealogists: Gold Medalists

*  Rockstar Genealogists: Silver and Bronze Medalists

John hasn't shared, yet, how many total votes there were, or statistics for each category.

Congratulations to the medalists of the Genealogy Rockstar poll, and to all of the Top Ten in each category.  Note also that Elizabeth Shown Mills requested to be removed from the poll after it opened, and John honored that request.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/genealogy-rockstar-poll-results.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver

Updated:  19 September, 10:30 PM PDT


52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks - Week 38: #45 Miranda (Wade) White (1804-1850)

Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks" in her blog post Challenge: 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  Here is my ancestor biography for week #38:

Miranda (Wade) White (1804-1850) is #45 on my Ahnentafel list, my third great-grandmother.  She married in about 1823 to #44 Jonathan White (1804-1850). 


I am descended through:

*  their son, #22 Henry Arnold White
 (1824-1885). who married #23 Amy Frances Oatley (1826-1864)
*  their daughter, 
#11 Julia E. White (1848-1913) who married #10 Thomas Richmond (1848-1917)

*  their daughter, #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962), who married #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942), 
* their son, #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983), who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002), in 1942.
*  their son, #1 Randall J. Seaver (1943-....)

 =====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):


*  Name:                    Miranda Wade[1]
*  Sex:                       Female   
*  Father:                   Simon Wade (1767-1857) [1]
*  Mother:                 Phebe Horton (1772-1820)[1]    

*  Alternate Name:   Maranda White[3-4]
*  Alternate Name:   Miranda Wade White[5]   
  
2)  INDIVIDUAL FACTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
  
*  Birth:                    25 June 1804, Foster, Providence, Rhode Island, United States[1]
*  Census:                 1 June 1850 (age 45), Killingly, Windham, Connecticut, United States[4]
*  Mortality Census: 1 June 1850 (age 46), Killingly, Windham, Connecticut, United States[3]
*  Death:                   27 August 1850 (age 46), of pleurisy; Killingly, Windham, Connecticut, United States[5]
*  Burial:                   after 27 August 1850 (after age 46), White-Chace Lot, Glocester, Providence, Rhode Island, United States[5]

3)  SPOUSE AND CHILDREN (with source citations as indicated in brackets):   
  
*  Spouse 1:               Jonathan White (1805-1850)[2]   
*  Marriage 1:            about 1823 (about age 19), probably Foster, Providence, Rhode Island, United States[2]
*  Child 1:                 Henry Arnold White (1824-1885)   
*  Child 2:                 Albert Henry White (1827-1910)   
*  Child 3:                 Harriet A. White (1836-    )   
  
4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

Miranda Wade was the daughter of Simon Wade and Phebe Horton, residents of Foster, Providence County, Rhode Island.[1]  However, the 1850 U.S. census and 1850 Mortality Schedule say that she was born in Glocester, Rhode Island.

The book Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut edited by William R. Cutter (published by Lewis Historical Publishing Company, New York, 1911), Volume IV, provides some information on this family on page 2125:

"(VI) Simon (3), son of Simon (2) Wade, was born November 22, 1767. He married, before 1790, Phebe Horton, born May 7, 1772, and lived at Foster.  Children:  James, born December 10, 1791; Catharine, October 12, 1793: Sarah, October 23, 1798; Arnold, June 26, 1800; Olive, September 23, 1802; Miranda, June 25, 1804; Fenner, March 30, 1807; Lawton, mentioned below."

The source for this information is probably Henry Lawton Wade, son of Lawton Wade and grandson of Simon Wade, who is the subject of this biographical sketch.

Miranda Wade married Jonathan White, in about 1823, probably in Foster, Rhode Island.[2]  Her oldest child, Henry Arnold White, was born in about 1824.  Albert Henry White was born in 1827, and Harriet A. White in 1836.

Miranda's husband, Jonathan White, died on 19 April 1850 of "lung fever."  His estate was probated on 27 April 1850 in which he named his wife "Maranda" and his three children.  

In the 1850 US Census, the remnant of the Jonathan White family resided in Killingly township, Windham County, Connecticut.[3]  The household included (enumerated on 14 September 1850):

*  Albert H. White - age 23, male, a farmer, $1200 in real property, born Gloucester RI
*  Harriet A. White - age 14, female, born Gloucester RI
*  Maranda White - age 46, female, born Gloucester RI

The 1850 U.S. Census Mortality Schedule entry for Maranda White has this information:[4]

Name:  Maranda White
Age:  46
Sex:  F
Color: [blank]
Free or slave: [blank]
Married or widowed: [blank]
Place of birth:  Gloucester R.I.
Month in which Person died: [blank]
Profession, Occupation or Trade: [blank]
Disease or Cause of Death:  Pleurisy
Number of Days Ill:  7 weeks

Jonathan and Miranda White have gravestones in the "White-Chace Yard" in Glocester, Providence County, Rhode Island.[5]  The Find A Grave memorial for Miranda Wade White does not have a photograph of the gravestone, and says that she died 27 August 1850.  

There is no probate record for Miranda (Wade) White in Killingly records.
 
5)  SOURCES

1. William R. Cutter, et al (editors) Genealogies and Family History of the State of Connecticut: A Record of the Achievements of Her People in the Making of a Commonwealth and the Founding of a Nation, Volume IV (New York, N.Y. : Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1911), in "Wade" sketch, page 2125, Miranda Wade birth.

2. Ruth Wilder Sherman, "Some Descendants of Jonathan White of Dartmouth MA and of Humphrey White of Glocester RI," The American Genealogist, Volume 56, Pages 113-118, page 116.

3. "United States Census, 1850 (Mortality Schedule)", Windham county, Connecticut, Killingly, Page 92 (stamped), line 34, Maranda White entry; indexed database and digital image, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org), FHL Microfilm US/CAN 234536, citing National Archives Microfilm Publication T655.

4. 1850 United States Federal Census, Windham County, Connecticut, population schedule, Killingly town; Page 351, dwelling #444, family #492, Albert H. White household;  digital image, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com); citing National Archives Microfilm Publication M432, Roll 51.


5. Jim Tipton, indexed database, Find A Grave (http://www.findagrave.com), White-Chace Lot (Glocester, R.I.), Miranda Wade White entry.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2014/09/52-ancestors-in-52-weeks-week-38-45.html

Copyright (c) 2014, Randall J. Seaver