Monday, October 3, 2011

Family History Month Infographic from Archives.com

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I received a link to this infographic from Julie Hill of Archives.com.  The original is on their blog at  http://www.archives.com/blog/industry-news/family-history-month-2011.html.

Archives.com encouraged geneabloggers to embed their infographic on their site, so I have!

Family History Month - Archives.com


What is the most intriguing part of this infographic?  It may be that the USA has about 1 million legal immigrants each year, and that about 65% of them naturalize. 

The bottom part of the infographic provides six things to do during Family History Month.  They include:

Build a Family Tree - Get the whole family involved by building your very own family tree.

Create a Family History Scrapbook - You can include photos, letters, records, mementos, and more.

*  Create a Photo Timeline - Use family photos to create a beautiful photo timeline for a grandparent or other relative.

Profile a Family Member - Interview an older family member, or document the life story of an ancestor.

Research Your Surname History - Research your surname and trace it back to your ancestors.

Put Together a Family Cookbook - Compile all your favorite recipes, along with the occasions when you traditionally cook them.

The infographic asks "How Will You Celebrate Family History Month?"

My answer:  By visiting with my family.  We just had my brother-in-law and his wife in town for three days.  I'm flying to Santa Cruz in ten days to be with my daughter and two grandsons for a weekend, and we're hosting our two granddaughters here in two weeks.    We'll be busy.

Then there is, of course, my genealogy society work, my Beginning Computer Genealogy class starts, in three weeks, blogging, entering data into my database, writing several articles, etc.

Thank you to Julie Hill and Archives.com for the infographic and the challenge.

2 comments:

Yvette Porter Moore said...

Great Post! Thank you!

Geolover said...

Interesting, but like the Ancestry.com 'educational' material on immigration (such as by Megan S.), it leaves out the 200-odd years of immigration prior to the 1820s.