Saturday, April 21, 2018

Surname Saturday - BROOKMAN (England to colonial New England)

It's Surname Saturday, and I'm "counting down" my Ancestral Name List each week.  


I am working in the 9th great-grandmothers by Ahnentafel number, and I am up to Ancestor #2105 who is Alice BROOKMAN (1600-1657). 
[Note: the earlier great-grandmothers and 9th great-grandfathers have been covered in earlier posts.]

My ancestral line back through one generations in this BROOKMAN family line is:


1. Randall J. Seaver

2. Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983)
3. Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002)

4. Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942)
5. Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962)

8. Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922)
9. Hattie Louise Hildreth (1857-1920)

16. Isaac Seaver (1823-1901)
17. Lucretia Townsend Smith (1827-1884)

32. Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825)
33. Abigail Gates (1797-1869)

64. Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816)
65. Martha Whitney (1764-1832)


130.  Samuel Whitney (1719-1782)
131.  Abigail Fletcher (1720-1783)

262.  John Fletcher (1692-1749)
263.  Mary Goble (1694-1734)


526.  Thomas Goble (1656-1724)
527.  Sarah Shepard (1657-1746)

1052.  Thomas Goble (1631-1690)
1053.  Ruth LNU (1633-1668)

2104.  Thomas Goble, born before 02 January 1591 in Westergate, Sussex, England; died before 11 December 1657 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.  He was the son of 4208. William Goble.  He married 05 November 1619 in Aldingbourne, Sussex, England.
2105.  Alice Brookman, born about 1600 in Aldingbourne, Sussex, England; died 1657 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.

Children of Thomas Goble and Alice Brookman are:
*  John Goble, born 1629 in Sussex, England; died before 26 March 1675 in England.
Thomas Goble, born about 1631 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; died 22 November 1690 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; married (1) Ruth LNU April 1656 in probably Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married (2) Mary Gove about 1668 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
*  Elizabeth Goble, born about 1633 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married (1) John White about 1653 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; born 1628 in England; died before 03 October 1676 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married (2) Thomas Carter 07 June 1682 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born before 06 March 1610 in Hinderclay, Suffolk, England; died 05 September 1684 in Woburn, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
*  Mary Goble, born before 27 February 1636 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married Daniel Dean about 1656 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; born 1630 in England; died 09 November 1725 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
*  Sarah Goble, born before 27 March 1638 in Charlestown, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; died 30 November 1717 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; married John Shepard before 1661 in probably Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born 26 October 1637 in Dedham, Norfolk, Massachusetts, United States; died 15 December 1699 in Concord, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States.
*  Daniel Goble, born before 18 July 1641 in Malden, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 26 September 1676 in Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States; married Hannah Brewer 25 February 1664 in Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; born 18 June 1645 in Cambridge, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States; died 11 September 1697 in Lancaster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States.

I have no certain information about the Brookman line in England.  FamilySearch Family Tree says that her parents were Robert Brookman and Ellen Numby, both born in 1585.  But the FSFT says that Alice was born in Charlestown, Mass. in 1593, so the profile is imperfect (I edited the profile to make it somewhat more accurate)..

Information about the Goble family was obtained from:

*  Evelyn Goble Steen, Goble Genealogy Homepage   (http://homepages.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~goble/homepage/), online database, Thomas (1) Goble (1591-1657) sketch.

*  Robert Charles Anderson, The Great Migration, 1634-1635, Volume 3, F-H (Boston : New England Historic Genealogical Society, 2002), pages 81-83, Thomas Goble sketch.


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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Friday, April 20, 2018

Genealogy News Bytes -- 20 April 2018


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last three days include:

1)  News Articles:


 
Ancestry Names Margo Georgiadis Chief Executive Officer

*  FamilySearch Chief Genealogical Officer, David Rencher

*  (US) Department of Commerce Announces Changes to Limited Access Death Master File (also called the Social Security Death Index, or SSDI)

*  The Genealogy of First Lady Barbara Bush

2)  Record Databases:

*  
New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 20 April 2018

 TheGenealogist adds War Memorial and headstone records

*  New Casualty Records on Fold3

*  20 April 2018 – New Genealogy Record Releases & Updates

*  22,100 Total FREE U.S. Historical Newspaper Links - First 2018 Update

3)  Genealogy Education:

 GeneaWebinars Calendar

 FamilySearch Classes Presented at RootsTech 2018 Now Online


*  Free Family History Library Classes and Webinars for April 2018

*  Irish Genealogy Virtual Conference 21st April

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Tuesday, 24 April 11 a.m.:  Get the Most from the MyHeritage Search Engine for Historical Records, by Daniel Horowitz


*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 25 April 11 a.m.: Verifying Information You Find Online, by Marian Pierre-Louis

*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Better Together: Making Your Case with Documents and DNA, by Patti Hobbs


*  Archived Family Tree Webinar:  Lincoln's Laws and the Records of War, by Judy G. Russell

*  "Member Friday" Family Tree Webinar:  Fun Family History Activities for the Youth at Your Family Reunion, by Janet Hovorka


*  The Photo Detective Podcast:  Episode 15: MemoryWeb


*  Family History Fanatics YouTube Channel:  Why are there so many Duplicates in FamilySearch?

*  Family History Fanatics YouTube Channel: Family History Fanatics Live Stream

*  Nicka Smith YouTube Channel:  BlackProGen LIVE! Ep 55: People of Color Genealogy Research in Tennessee

*  DearMYRTLE YouTube Channel:  GreekGen 2 - Civil and Church Records in Greece

*  DearMYRTLE YouTube Channel:  WACKY Wednesday - Favorite GOOGLE Things

*  AmericanAncestors YouTube Channel:  Tracing Mayflower Lineage Resources at AmericanAncestors org

4)  Bargains:

*  Genealogy Bargains for Friday, April 20,  2018


*  MyHeritage DNA National DNA Day Sale – Just $69

Save 30% on 23andMe during National DNA Day Sale – As Low As $69 USD!

*  AncestryDNA Lowest Price of the Year! $59 USD for National DNA Day 2018

5)  Neat Stuff:

 
An Incredible Story: 'Hi con gai, how are you doing today?'

*  Tracing Your Roots: Where Were My Black Homeowning Ancestors From?

Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 17 April 2018?


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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 20 April 2018

I received this information form Findmypast today:

================================================

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

There are over 1.1 million new records and newspaper articles available to search this Findmypast Friday, including:

British Army Officers' Widows' Pension Forms 1755-1908

Indexed online for the first time, British Army Officers' Widows' Pension Forms 1755 - 1908, spans more than 150 years of British military history and contains over 13,000 transcripts and scanned images taken from The National Archives series "WO 42: War Office: Officers' Birth Certificates, Wills and Personal Papers". The collection consists of bundles of original documents submitted in support of pension claims made by the widows of British Army officers. It covers the families of officers who died in service or on half pay as well as compassionate allowances awarded to the children of both deceased and disabled officers.

These bundles include a variety of original army forms and supporting documents including original application forms completed by widows, marriage and death details of the officers in question, as well as death certificates, marriage certificates, birth certificates and baptismal records for their wives and children.

Somerset Registers & Records

There are four titles included in this collection. These publications may provide you with details of your ancestor's birth, marriage, or burial. Bishop's transcripts, parish registers, and monumental inscriptions are included and provide dates, names, and places of vital events. The four titles currently available to search include:

*  Dwelly's Parish Records Vols I & II – Bishop's Transcripts from Wells Diocesan Registry, published 1914
*  Parish Registers of Chipstable, Raddington, Kittisford & Pitcombe in Dwelly's Parish Records, 1538-1837
*  Parish Register of Wilton, 1558-1837
*  Wells Cathedral Monumental Inscriptions and Heraldry, published 1892

Rutland Registers & Records

Explore 180 pages of the Registers of North Luffenham, 1565-1832, to uncover baptisms, marriages, burials and monumental inscriptions. North Luffenham is a village in the landlocked county of Rutland. Based on cemetery findings, the village dates back to the 5th century. In addition to the registers containing baptisms, marriages, and burials, there are also monumental inscriptions included towards the end of this publication.

Northumberland Registers & Records

Explore registers and records from the English county of Northumberland. Discover your ancestor in parish registers, and learn when and where your ancestor's baptism, marriage, or burial took place. This collection currently comprises five publications:

*  Early Deeds Relating to Newcastle Upon Tyne, 1100-1600
*  Parish Registers of Alnham, Ceadnell, Chatton & Ilderton, 1688-1812
*  Parish Registers of Edlingham, 1658-1812
*  Parish Registers of Halton, 1654-1812
*  Parish Registers of Ingram, 1682-1812

Nottinghamshire Registers & Records

Learn more about the English county of Nottinghamshire and its inhabitants with this collection of registers and records. Find your ancestor in parish registers, and learn when and where your ancestor's baptism, marriage, or burial took place. This collection currently comprises eight publications, including:

*  Highways & Byways in Nottinghamshire, published 1924
*  History of the Parish of Gedling – Including Marriage Registers, 1558-1812
*  Nottinghamshire Marriage Licenses, Vol II Archdeaconry Court & Peculiar of Southwell, 1701-1853
*   Old Nottinghamshire, published 1881
*   Parish Register Transcripts of 24 Parishes Belonging to the Peculiar of Southwell, 1600-1700
*   Parish Registers of Warsop – Extracts with Notes, 1538-1912
*  The Nottingham Date Book, published 1884
*  Thorton's History of Nottinghamshire, updated by John Throsby, published 1797

British Newspapers

Over 787,000 articles and 17 new titles have been added to our collection of historic British newspapers.

*  Mansfield Reporter
*  Craven Herald
*  Cambridgeshire Times
*  Dereham and Fakenham Times
*  Bexley Heath and Bexley Observer
*  Woman's Dreadnought
*  Young Woman
*  International Woman Suffrage News
*  Music Hall and Theatre Review
*  Keighley News
*  Horncastle News
*  Military Register
*  Brecon and Radnor Express and Carmarthen Gazette
*  Witney Gazette and West Oxfordshire Advertiser
*  Bicester Advertiser
*  Leicester Guardian
*  Leicester Daily Post


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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary subscription to Findmypast, and have accepted meals and services from Findmypast, as a Findmypast Ambassador.  This has not affected my objectivity relative to Findmypast and its products.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

52 Ancestors - Week 223: #314 Joseph Richards (1703-1748) of Lynn and Southborough, Massachusetts

Joseph Richards is #314 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandfather, who married #315 Mary Bowden (1705-1755)  in 1726 in Lynn, Massachusetts.


I am descended through:

*  their daughter #157 Mary Richards (1733-????) who had a relationship with   #156 Isaac Buck (1732-?????) in 1757.
*  their son, #78 Isaac Buck (1757-1846) married #79 Martha Phillips (1764-????) in 1780.
*  their daughter, #39 Sophia Buck (1797-1882 married  #38 Thomas J. Newton (ca 178800-????) in about 1834.
*  their daughter #19 Sophia Newton (1834-1923) married #18 Edward Hildreth (1831-1899) in 1852.
*  their daughter #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) married #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) married #5 Alma Bessie Richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

=====================================================

1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
*  Name:                      Joseph Richards[1–10]    

*  Sex:                         Male    

*  Father:                    Crispus Richards (1681-1763)    
*  Mother:                   Sarah Collins (1678-1757)  

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Birth:                      about 1703, Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States[10]    

*  Deed:                     16 April 1726 (about age 23), given land by father Crispus Richards, 12 acres of upland and swamp, and five common lots; Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States[2]    
*  Deed:                     9 February 1732/3 (about age 30), bought land from Joseph Wetherbee for 250 pounds, 73 acres in two parcels; Southborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[4]    
*  Deed:                    26 February 1732/3 (about age 30), sold two common lots in Lynn to John Hart; Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States[5]    
*  Deed:                    23 April 1733 (about age 30), sold 12 acres of land in Lynn to John Richards Jr. for 490 pounds; Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States[6]    

*  Will:                     12 March 1747/8 (about age 45), will written; Southborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[7]    

*  Death:                  4 June 1748 (about age 45), Southborough, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[8–9]  

3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Spouse 1:             Mary Bowden (1705-1755)    
*  Marriage 1:          5 May 1726 (about age 23), Lynn, Essex, Massachusetts, United States[3]    

*  Child 1:               William Richards (1729-1794)    
*  Child 2:               Joseph Richards (1731-    )    
*  Child 3:               Mary Richards (1733-    )    
*  Child 4:               Ebenezer Richards (1738-1807)    
*  Child 5:               Martha Richards (1740-    )    
*  Child 6:               John Richards (1742-1840)    
*  Child 7:               Hannah Richards (1744-1841)    
*  Child 8:               Esther Richards (1746-1847)  


4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):    

The early descendants of Edward Richards of Lynn were described in Winifred Lovering Holman's article "Edward Richards of Lynn" in The Essex Genealogist[1].

Joseph Richards was born about 1703 in Lynn, Massachusetts, the eldest child of seven children born to Crispus and Sarah (Collins) Richards of Lynn[10].

On 16 April 1726, Crispus Richards, husbandman of Lynn, gave land in Lynn to his son Joseph Richards, yeoman of Lynn, in consideration for natural love, good will and affection[2].  The land in Lynn was upland and swamp which was previously owned by his grandfather Crispus Brewer and was about 12 acres.  It was bounded northerly by a country road, easterly on his own land, southerly by land of Ebenezer Burrill and westerly by land of Benjamin Carr.  Also, a Common lot of 15 acres in the general pasture in the third division, and a Common lot of 5 acres in the Ox pasture in the fourth division, and a Common lot of 1 acre and 140 poles in the fifth division, and a Common lot of 1 acre and 130 poles in the sixth division, and a Common lot of 72 poles in the sixth division.   The witnesses were William Collins and Edmand Lewis.  The deed was recorded on 3 May 1726.

On 5 May 1726, Joseph Richards married Mary Bowden in Lynn, Massachusetts[3].  They had 8 children between 1730 and 1746.  The first two were recorded in Lynn town records, and the other six were recorded in Southborough, Massachusetts town records.

The Joseph Richards family, along with other families of Lynn in Essex County, moved to Southborough in Worcester County in early 1733.

On 9 February 1732/3, Joseph Wetherbee, husbandman of Southborough, sold land in Southborough to Joseph Richards, husbandman of Lynn, for 250 pounds in currant money[4].  The land was 60 acres in Southborough, lying on the north side of the road by Caleb Wetherbee's land, bounded westerly by common land and land of Thomas Bellows, northerly by land of Benjamin Woods, and easterly by Caleb Wetherbee's land, with a dwelling house; also a second piece of land with 13 acres bounded northerly by land of Woods, southerly by land of Caleb Wetherbee, westerly by Woods land, and easterly by Benjamin Newton's land.  The deed was witnessed by Jonathan Collins and John Richards, Jr.  The deed was recorded on 21 September 1742.

On 26 February 1732/3, Joseph Richards Jr., yeoman of Lynn, sold land to John Hart, shipwright of Lynn, for nine pounds in good publick bills of credit[5].  The land in Lynn was a Common lot in the 6th Division that contained one acre and 130 poles and also a common lot in the 6th Division of 72 poles.  The deed was witnessed by Theo. Burrill and Mary Baldwin.  The deed was recorded 26 Feberuary 1732/3.

On 23 April 1733, John Richards, husbandman of Lynn, sold land in Lynn to his brother, John Richards Jr., joyner of Lynn, for 490 pounds[6].  The land in Lynn was upland and swamp which was given by his father Crispus Richards, and  was about 12 acres.  It was bounded northerly by the country road leading to Marblehead, easterly on his father's land, southerly and westerly by land of Ebenezer Burrill.  Also, a Common lot of 15 acres and 20 poles in Edgcombs pasture in the third division, and also the small lot purchased of his Aunt Lyscomb.  The witnesses were William Collins and Ester Este.  The deed was recorded on 22 May 1753.

Joseph Richards died in Southborough on 4 June 1748[8-9].  There are no known burial records for him.

Joseph Richards died testate, and his probate records are in Worcester County Probate Records, Probate Docket #50,155[7].  The will reads:

"In the Name of God Amen the Twelfth Day of March AD 1747/8.  I Joseph richards of Southborough in the County of Worcester within his majestys province of the Massachusetts Bay in New England yeoman, being under Indisposition of Body but of Perfect mind and memory Thanks be Given unto god.  Therefore Calling unto mind the mortality of my Body and Knowing that it is appointed for all men once to Dye do make and ordain this my Last will and Testament that is to say principally & First of all I Give and Recommend my Soul into the hands of God that gave it and my Body I recommend to the Earth to be Burried in Decent Christian Burrial at the Discretion of my Executor, Nothing Doubting but at the General Resurrection I Shall Receive the Same again by the mighty Power of God and as Touching Such Worldly Goods & Estate wherewith it hath pleased God to Bless me in this Life I Give Demise and Dispose of ye Same in the Following manner and form --

"Imprimis I Give & Bequeath to Mary my Dearly Beloved wife the whole of all of any moveable Estate after all my Debts & Funeral Charges are paid of all Sorts both ye Indoor and outdoor moveables Including all my Creatures of all sorts and I also Give her the whole Benefit & Improvement of all my Lands untill my Son Joseph Richards arive to the age of Twenty one years and her Lawfull Right of Thirds in the same Dureing Life or as She and they to whom the said Land herein Given Shall agree.

"Secondly I Give to my Son William Richards the Full half part of all my Lands & Buildings as they shall appear to be mine by Record he yielding to his mother the use and Benifit of the Said Lands as aforesaid and paying Fifty pounds a peice to Each of his Brothers and Sisters as they arive at the age of Twenty one years old Tenor at the same Value it is at the Day of This Date and No Division of said Lands to be made untill the Time that said Joseph will be Twenty one years of age, the said Brothers & Sisters to whom the said Fifty pounds a peice is to be paid as aforesaid is Mary Eben-r Martha John Hannah and Esther.

"Thirdly I Give to my Son Joseph Richards the other half part of all my said Lands and Buildings for him and his said Brother William to Divide when the said Joseph shall be Twenty one years old always yielding to his said Mother her Right of Thirds in the Same Dureing her Life as aforesaid and the said Joseph Shall pay to Each of Their said Brothers and Sisters as they Come to Twenty one Years of age Fifty pounds a peice old Tenor at the Same Value it is at the Day of the Date hereof.

"Fourthly I Give to my Daughter Mary one hundred pounds old Tenor of the Present Value to be paid her in Equal proportion by my said son William Richards and Joseph Richards when the said Mary is Twenty one years old as aforesaid.

"Fifthly I Give to my Son Eben-r Richards to be paid to him when he Comes to be Twenty one years of age by my said Sons William and Joseph the Sum of one hundred pounds old Tenor at ye Present Value in Equal proportion from them as aforesaid.

"Sixthly I Give to my Daughter Martha when she comes to be Twenty one years old one hundred pounds old Tenor of the Present Value to be paid her by her said Brothers William and Joseph in Equal proportion from them as aforesaid.

"Seventhly I Give to my Son John Richards one hundred pounds to be paid to him when he Comes to be Twenty one years old, old Tenor of the Present Value to be paid to him then by said William and Joseph in Equal proportion from them as aforesaid.

"Eightly I Give to my Daughter Hannah Richards one hundred pounds old Tenor of this Present to be paid to her when she comes to be Twenty one years old by my said Sons William and Joseph in Equal proportion by them as aforesaid.

"Ninethly I Give to my Daughter Esther Richards one hundred pounds old Tenor of the Present Value to be paid to her the said Esther when she Comes to be Twenty one years old by her two said Brothers William and Joseph in Equal proportion by them as aforesaid.

"Tenthly I do hereby Constitute Make and Ordain Mr. Thomas Graves of said Southborough in the County and province aforesaid yeoman my Sole Executor of this my Last will and Testament and I do hereby Utterly Disalow Revoke & Disanul all and Every other Former Testaments wills Legacies and Bequests and Executors by me in any ways Beforenamed Willed and Bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this an no other to be my Last Will and Testament In Witness whereof I have hereunto Set my hand and Seal the Day and year before written.
Joseph Richards  (seal)

"Signed Sealed published pronounced and Declared
by the said Joseph Richards as his Last Will and
Testament in the presence of us the Subscribers
Caleb Witherbee
John Amsden
Samuel Lyscom"

The will was proved by the Court at Worcester on 16 August 1748, with Caleb Witherbee and Samuel Lyscom appearing and making a solemn oath that they saw Joseph Richards the Testator sign and seal the will and heard him at that time say that it was his Last will and testament. However, Thomas Graves declined the executorship of the estate, and Mary Richards, the widow, was appointed administratrix of the estate.
   
5)  SOURCES


1. Winifred Lovering Holman, "Edward Richards of Lynn," The Essex Genealogist, Volume 13, Number 1, February 1993., pages 33-39, Richards family sketches.

2. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 20 April 2018), Essex County, Volume 48, page 133, Crispus Richards to Joseph Richards, 16 April 1726, recorded 3 May 1726.

3. Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts to the end of the Year 1849 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1906), 2 Volumes, Volume 2, Marriages, page 327, Joseph Richards and Mary Bouden entry, 1726.

4. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 20 April 2018, Worcester County, Volume 15, page 297, Joseph Wetherbee to Joseph Richards, 9 February 1732/3, recorded 21 September 1742.

5. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 20 April 2018, Essex County, Volume 63, page 52, Joseph Richards Jr. to John Hart, 26 February 1732/3, recorded 26 February 1732/3.

6. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 20 April 2018, Essex County, Volume 98, page 142, Joseph Richards  to John Richards, Jr. Hart, 23 April 1733, recorded 22 May 1753.

7. "Worcester County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1731-1881," digital images, New England Historic Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org), Volume 3, Page 29, Joseph Richards of Southborough, accessed on FHL US/CAN Microfilm 0,856,275.

8. "Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988," digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), "Southborough Births, Marriages and Deaths," Page 85 (image 124 of 1007), Joseph Richards death entry.

9. Systematic Historic Fund, Vital Records of Southborough, Massachusetts to the end of the Year 1849 (Worcester, Mass.: Franklin P. Rice, 1903), Deaths, page 181, Joseph Richards entry, 1748.

10. Winifred Lovering Holman, "Edward Richards of Lynn", The Essex Genealogist, Volume 13, Number 1, February 1993, page 36, Joseph Richards sketch.

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NOTE:  Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post 
 52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2018 to 260 Ancestors in 260 Weeks.

Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, April 19, 2018

Seavers in the News -- 1946 Wedding of Wallace Seaver and Madeline South


It's time for another edition of "Seavers in the News" - a semi-regular feature from the historical newspapers about persons with the surname Seaver that are interesting, useful, fun, macabre, or add information to my family tree database.

This week's entry is from the Boston [Mass.] Herald newspaper dated 19 May 1946:


The transcription of this article is:

"Miss Madeline South Bride of Mr. Seaver


The Rev. J. Caleb Justice assisted the bridegroom's brother, the Rev. Ralph F. Seaver, Jr., of Thompsonville, Ct., in performing the 4:30 o'clock ceremony at the Union Congregational Church of Weymouth and Braintree, last Saturday afternoon, when Miss Madeline G, South and Mr. Wallace G. Seaver were married.  The ceremony was followed by a reception in the church parlors.

"The bride, daughter of Mrs. Harold T. South of East Braintree and the late Mr. South, was given in marriage by her brother, Mr. Robert T. South.  She wore a gown of white silk and net with a train and sweetheart neckline.  Her finger-tip veil edged with lace fell from a seed pearl coronet and her bouquet combined carnations and sweet peas.

"As maid of honor, Miss Grace Rideout of East Braintree was gowned in yellow lace.  Mrs. Robert T. South, sister-in-law of the bride, was matron of honor, wearing lavender lace.  Both had headdresses of flowers with short veils and arm bouquets of mixed spring flowers.  Two other bridal attendants were gowned in pink taffeta and net, while the other two wore similar gowns of blue.  Miss Jean Cochrane of Cambridge and Mrs. James D. Cummings, Jr., of Malden were bridesmaids.  The junior bridesmaids were Miss Marjorie Klay of Braintree and Miss Natalie Richard of Norton.  They all wore flowered headdresses and carried arm bouquets of yellow snapdragon and blue delphinium.

"The bridegroom had his brother, Mr. Leigh Seaver of East Wareham as best man, and two other brothers, Mr. Clifford Seaver of Norwood and Mr. Kenneth Seaver of Onset, ushered with Mr. Thomas Reidy of East Wareham and Mr. James D. Cummings, Jr., of Malden.

"After a short wedding trip, Mr. Seaver, son of Mr. and Mrs. Ralph F. Seaver of Onset, and his bride will make their home in East Wareham."

The source citation for this article is:

"
Miss Madeline South Bride of Mr. Seaver," Boston [Mass.] Herald, 19 May 1946, page 19, column 5, Madeline South and Wallace Seaver marriage; online image, GenealogyBank (www.genealogybank.com : accessed 19 April 2018), Newspaper Archives collection.

Five sons of Ralph Fremont Seaver (1884-1963) and Grace Blanche Aldrich (1884-1971) are mentioned in this wedding announcement - the bridegroom and four of his brothers, including the presiding minister, Rev. Ralph F. Seaver, Jr.  

I had all of these persons in my RootsMagic family tree database, but I did not have the marriage date and place.  I did not know that Ralph F. Seaver Jr. was a minister.

I have not been able to connect Wallace G. Seaver's 2nd great-grandfather, Joseph T. Seaver (1805-????) of Taunton, Mass. who married Betsey N. Davis in 1830 to a set of parents, although I have several candidates.  .  


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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

1726 Marriage Record of Joseph Richards and Mary Bowden in Lynn, Mass. - Post 408 for Treasure Chest Thursday

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - a chance to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the 1726 marriage record of Joseph Richards and Mary Bouden in the Lynn, Massachusetts vital record book:

The Richards-Bouden marriage record is:


The transcription of this record is:

"[RICHARDS] Joseph, and Mary Bouden, May 5, 1716*"

The source citation for this record is:

Vital Records of Lynn, Massachusetts to the end of the Year 1849 (Salem, Mass. : The Essex Institute, 1906), 2 Volumes, Marriages, page 327, Joseph richards and Mary Bouden entry, 1726.

Joseph Richards (1703-1748) was the son of Crispus Richards and Sarah Collins of Lynn, Mass.  Mary Bowden (1705-1755) was the daughter of Michael Bowden and Sarah Davis of Lynn.  Joseph and Mary (Bowden) Richards had eight children between 1730 and 1746.  

Joseph Richards and Mary Bowden are my 6th great-grandparents.  I am descended from their daughter Mary Richards (1733-????) who had a relationship with Isaac Buck (1732-????).

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Copyright (c) 2018, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Guest Post: How to Get Started With Genealogy In 5 Steps, by Tony Ho Tran

I accept guest posts that deal with genealogy and family history topics.  One of my correspondents is Tony Ho Tran, who writes the interesting SaigonToSiouxCity blog.  He offered this guest post (original at http://saigontosiouxcity.com/2018/04/11/how-to-get-started-with-genealogy-in-5-steps/):

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How to get started with genealogy in 5 steps
By Tony Ho Tran


Ah genetic genealogy. 

It’s endlessly heartwarming, maddeningly frustrating, and ceaselessly entertaining all in one hobby. 

Plus it can both solve mysteries AND open the Pandora’s Box to a ton of new ones as well. You literally don’t know what is out there. The things you learn can totally upend your worldview and everything you THOUGHT you knew about your family.

Okay, that’s a lot scarier than I meant it to sound (but it’s true).

And since I’ve started, I’ve had a lot of people come to me for advice on how they can get started too. That’s why I want to break down a great system to help YOU get started with genetic genealogy today.

Step 1: Set a concrete goal

A good, clear goal can mean the difference between finding lost family members and uncovering your family tree OR aimlessly browsing census records for a few days before ignoring your ancestry research forever.

I’m not exaggerating. Setting goals is an important psychological trigger. Knowing what you want will give you the focus and drive to become a successful genealogist.

Many genealogists just skip this because they don’t even think to do it. When you do that, though, you’re setting yourself up to fail.

BUT it’s not enough to just set a goal — it also needs to be a good one. And a good goal will have three crucial elements:

  • Precise. Vague goals are bad goals. That’s why so many people fail when they set New Year’s Resolution goals like, “I want to hit the gym” are doomed to fail. Rather if your goal was something like, “I want to lose 30 pounds,” you’d have a much better chance of attaining it.
  • Measurable. How do you know when you’ve accomplished your goal? Is it when you’ve found your birth parents? Or is it when you’ve discovered where your 3x great-grandfather was born? Give a clear measure of success to your goal.
  • Timely. While this isn’t entirely necessary it can help. If you have a time constraint to your goal, it could give you the motivation to accomplish it. Maybe you want to find the county in Ireland where your family is from in time for Christmas. Maybe you want to find your birth mom in time for next Mother’s Day. Time cues like this can be a huge psychological factor for you.

ASSIGNMENT: Set a genealogy goal that’s specific, measurable, and timely (3 - 10 minutes)

What’s YOUR genealogy goal? Do you want to expand your family tree by 5 generations? Do you want to find your sibling who was given up for adoption? The sky is the limit for your goal.

My first genealogy goal was to find my grandfather’s name and birth location. Each time I booted up AncestryDNA, I had that in mind. It especially helped when I got a DNA test and began reaching out to cousins.

Which brings us to...

Step 2: Get a DNA test

This is the part that puts the “genetic” in “genetic genealogy.” If you’re reading this now, you’re #blessed enough to be in a time I consider to be the golden age of DNA testing kits.

For the low price of $79 to $100, you can uncover shocking and sordid family secrets you wouldn’t have conceived of in your wildest imagination. Amazing!

But with so many DNA tests out there, which do you choose?

My answer: One of the Big Three ancestry tests:

  • 23andMe. This is the DNA testing kit that really brought genetic genealogy into vogue. Currently, the company offers two kits: A $100 edition that provides just the ancestry composition and a $200 one that includes a comprehensive medical report. While the medical report is fun, I suggest going with the lower cost ancestry composition
  • FamilyTree DNA. Another great ancestry test — if not a little more lean in terms of tools than the other two on the list. FamilyTree DNA does offer y-DNA and mt-DNA testing along with autosomal, which really help with your journey as you become more advanced. 
  • AncestryDNA (my recommendation). This is the most well-known ancestry company on the list — and for good reason. Ancestry.com has helped millions of users find their family members for over a decade. And now with their AncestryDNA service, you can connect with their massive database of users and family trees to help with your search. I recommend this one for any beginner.

While I do think that AncestryDNA offers everything a beginner genealogist could want, you shouldn’t just stop at one. Renowned genealogist Cece Moore suggests that genealogists “fish in all three ponds” when it comes to their research.

That means getting a test from 23andMe, Family Tree DNA, and AncestryDNA. That’s what I did and I was able to connect with the man who turned out to be my grandfather’s brother on Family Tree DNA — and it’s not even the one I recommend! Crazy.

ASSIGNMENT: Get a DNA test — or more! (6 - 12 weeks)
COST: $79 - $200

Though the time varies for each company, a typical DNA test is going to take 6 - 8 weeks to get an ancestry composition report and start connecting you with cousins. I know. It’s TRAGIC how long it takes — but you’re going to find that patience is one of the most important qualities to have as a genealogist.

While you’re waiting, though, it’s the perfect time to get started on another important step:

Step 3: Build a family tree on Ancestry.com

Your family tree is your business card. It’s the thing you’re going to share with the other people you meet in your journey that’ll help you connect with even more family members.

And like any good business card, it needs to be simple and shareable.

Also doesn’t hurt if your family tree comes in egg shell white.
There are a few very good websites that can help you build out your family tree. However, I recommend you build out a tree on Ancestry.com (Yeah, I know. I’m starting to sound like a commercial for them).

Ancestry.com is great for a few reasons:

  • Simple interface. It’s a very straightforward platform that allows you to easily construct a family tree AND share it with others. There are a lot of other bells and whistles that allow you to get into the weeds of ancestry BUT they’re optional. 
  • Connects with your DNA test. If you get a DNA test at AncestryDNA, they’ll connect you kit to your family tree. That means when you view your cousins, you’ll also be able to view their family trees (depending on their privacy settings). 
  • Highly collaborative. Ancestry.com not only allows you to share your tree, but you can allow other users on the platform to edit and add to your tree too. Very handy if you’re working with a genealogy partner. 

Luckily, it’s completely free to build your tree on Ancestry.com.

Unluckily, you won’t be able to access any US or international records without a paid membership.  Currently, memberships for US records are $19.99 / month or $99 for a six-month membership. Prices only go up when you get more records.

BUT if you get a DNA test through AncestryDNA, you can get a discounted rate for memberships. Highly advantageous for a beginner genealogist.

ASSIGNMENT: Build your family tree (1 - 3 hours)

The goal here is to build out your family tree as much as you can while you wait for your DNA test to get back. That means siblings, parents, aunts, uncles, grandparents, great-grandparents, your second cousin four times removed — whatever!

The more comprehensive your tree is the easier it’ll be for you to help establish relationships with the cousins you’ll connect with via your DNA test.

Which brings us to…

Step 4: Connect with your cousins — with scripts

You have your family tree. You have your goal. And now, you have your DNA test back.
It’s time to start reaching out to your cousins.

Each of the Big Three DNA tests allow you to connect with their database of users based on your estimated relation to them. However, reaching out to them can be easier said than done.

After all, It can be nerve-wracking to reach out to complete strangers — let alone complete strangers who happen to be your relatives.

What do you say? You want them to respond but you don’t want to freak them out. How do you navigate this freaking weird social situation?

Simple: With scripts.

This one:
[COUSIN’S NAME], 
My name’s Tony and I’m glad to connect with you! It looks like we’re 1st cousins which is great.  
I’m searching for the identity of my grandfather. He was an American soldier who served in the Vietnam War with whom we lost contact with in the 1970s. If he sounds familiar, I’d love to hear your thoughts on him.  
If there’s anything I can do for you, please feel free to reach out. I look forward to hearing from you soon. 
-Tony
This is a friendly and straightforward script that 1. Leverages your goal that you wrote in the first step and 2. Makes it clear that you want to do all you can to help your cousin on their journey as well.
This will increase your chances of getting a response AND establish good terms with your newfound relative.

ASSIGNMENT: Reach out to your cousins with scripts (30 mins - 1 hour)

Of course, you’re going to want to mold the script above to your specific situation, but it’s handy to have when you’re reaching out to multiple cousins at one time.

And you don’t have to just use it on the cousins you find in the DNA testing databases too. In fact, that script will come in hand for step 5:

Step 5: Upload raw DNA information to GEDMatch

GEDMatch is a powerful third-party DNA analysis tool that processes your raw autosomal DNA information and connects you with cousins in other DNA tests.

GEDMatch is just awesome because it allows you to connect with cousins who tested with companies you didn’t AND do a deep analysis of your DNA and how it compares with others.


GEDMatch will also give you a rough estimation of how many generations it is until you can find the most recent common ancestor you share with the cousin.

The best part? The service is entirely FREE.

ASSIGNMENT: Get your raw DNA and upload it onto GEDMatch (1 hour)
COST: Free ninety-nine. 

All of the Big Three tests allow you get download your raw DNA data (which sounds gross but is just a computer file). Simply follow these steps to upload your information on GEDMatch:

  • Step 1: Download your raw DNA information.
  • Step 2: Create an account on GEDMatch.
  • Step 3: Go to the GEDMatch homepage and click on the “Generic upload FAST” link.
  • Step 4: Follow the instructions for your specific DNA kit. 
  • Step 5: Wait for GEDMatch to process your information
  • Step 6: Finished! Start connecting with cousins!
Step 6: Repeat as necessary

That’s right, there’s a step six! Like any good shampoo you’re going to want to repeat this process again as necessary.

As you become a more experienced and advanced genealogist, you’re going to break from this system occasionally — and that’s totally fine!

What’s important is that you know what you want to accomplish from you genealogy goals and have the tools necessary to accomplish them.

ASSIGNMENT: Sign up for my newsletter AND shoot my an email with your genealogy goals. 

If you want even more help and access to my insights on genealogy, head over to SaigonToSiouxCity.com and sign up for my newsletter.

Every week, I’ll send you the best genealogy tips, tricks, and insights.

Also be sure to shoot me an email with what you’re trying to do. I’d LOVE to help you however I can.

(c) 2018, Tony Ho Tran.  www.saigontosiouxcity.com

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The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2018/04/guest-post-how-to-get-started-with.html

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.