Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Genealogy News Bytes - 22 October 2019


Some of the genealogy news and education items across my monitor the last four days include:



2)  New or Updated Record Collections:



3)  Genealogy Education - Webinars (times are US Pacific):

 GeneaWebinars Calendar




*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 23 October, 11 a.m.:  Privacy: How to Protect Your Information Online, by Judy G. Russell

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Wednesday, 23 October, 3 a.m.:  Die MyHeritage Matching Technologien (German), by MyHeritage

*  Upcoming Family Tree Webinar - Friday, 25 October, 11 a.m.:   Decoding Secret Societies: Finding Your Female Fraternal Ancestors, by Michael L. Strauss

4)  Genealogy Education - Podcasts:

*  Fisher’s Top Tips:  #121r - Unindexed Records



5)  Genealogy Videos (YouTube):

*  BYU Family History Library:  FamilySearch Messages by Harold Davis


*  Cousin Russ:  FTM2019 People Ignored Hints





6)  Genealogy Bargains:


7)  DNA Stories




8)  Did you miss the last Genealogy News Bytes - 18 October 2019?

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Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Using Ancestry.com Resources to Find Edna's Maiden Name, and More

Many years ago (I don't know how many), I used a 1930 U.S. census record to add Charles W. Dill and his wife Edna D. Dill to my family tree.  I was mining the census records for Dill families at the time.

I have thousands of profiles in my RootsMagic family tree (and by extension, my Ancestry Member Tree), of females with no maiden name.  Edna D. was one of them. 

All I knew about Edna D. Dill was that she was born in about 1886 in Massachusetts, according to the census record.

Edna D. sat in my family tree for many years waiting for me to discover her maiden name, parents names, birth, death, marriage and burial dates and locations.  At some point, I added Edna D. to my Ancestry Member Tree, and Ancestry.com eventually found some records to show me information about her life in the form of Record Hints.  They were just sitting there waiting for me to discover them.

When I was looking for Record Hints over the weekend for the Newspapers.com Obituary Index, I ran the "Mining Tool" (see Using the "Mining Ancestry.com Hints From a Specific Collection" Tool), Edna D. was at the top of my list:

Aha.  Edna Dorsey Dill!  Is that my Edna D.?  I clicked on the link for the record and saw the record summary:

The summary says the obituary or death notice was in The South Bend, Indiana newspaper dated 15 August 1974.  I clicked on the "View" link to see the actual record on Newspapers.com:


Well, that doesn't help much, does it?  Oh well.

But wait - there were "Suggested Records" on the record summary on the right-hand side of the screen.  Here is the continuation of the record summary:


At the top of the "Suggested Records" list is the North Carolina, Death Certificates, 1909-1976 collection with a link to a record for Edna Dorsey Dill:


The record summary provides a birth date and place, a death date and place, and parents names.  Here is the certificate image:

So Edna D. Dill's maiden name is Dorsey.  She was born 8 January 1886 in Illinois to Benjamin L. and Frances J. (Loomis) Dorsey.  She died 15 August 1974 in Asheville, North Carolina.  She was widowed, a housewife, and died of a stroke.  

There are more "Suggested Records," including: 

*  1900 and 1910 census records as Edna Dorsey.

*  1930 and 1940 census records as Edna D. Dill.  The 1930 census indicates she was age 39 when she first married - so in about 1925.

*  North Carolina Death Index entry for Edna Dill.

*  Social Security Death Index record for Edna Dill with the same birth and death dates.

*  Find A Grave memorial for her burial in LaPorte, Indiana (near South Bend, where she had lived part of her life), with the same birth and death dates.

*  City Directories that provide residence information for Edna D. Dill from about 1930 to 1960.

I searched on Ancestry.com and FamilySearch for Edna Dorsey and Edna Dill, born in about 1886, to see if there were other records not in the "Suggested Records" and did not find any other significant records.

So, from a death notice in an Ancestry record collection, I was able to find much information for Edna (Dorsey) Dill in other available records online.

I entered much of that information into my profile for Edna D. in my RootsMagic tree, and now I have a fairly complete profile (I still need the birth town, and the marriage date and place). 

The information for her birth date is an Original Source with Secondary Information and Direct Evidence.  The information for her death date and place is an Original source with Primary Information and Direct Evidence.  The information in other Derivative Sources (Census, Find A Grave, SSDI) is consistent with the death certificate information.

As you can see, I was able to add significant information to my profile for Edna based on the Ancestry Hints and Suggested Records in less than one hour yesterday.  Ten or 15 years ago, how long would it have taken me to find all of the above information (census, death, directory, cemetery, etc.)?  My guess it would have taken me several months or more, requiring several letters and perhaps travel to the locations.  It is possible that I never would have found information about her in traditional research.

All of the above shows the 21st century power of digitized records and record provider search capabilities, and features like Suggested Records and family tree Hints for specific persons.  Of course, Ancestry.com is not the only record provider that has these features.

I am very thankful for these time-saving capabilities and features that I pay for.  My family tree is improved every day because of these capabilities.  One of my problems is that I have thousands of entries like Edna D., and it takes time to add sufficient content and source citations to a profile like this example.  One more down, perhaps 20,000 to go.

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Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/using-ancestrycom-resources-to-find.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Tuesday's Tip - Use the Ancestry.com Collection for U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims

The Ancestry.com record collection for the U.S. Social Security Applications and Claims, 1936-2007 is one of my favorite collections.  



The description of the collection on the collection page says:
"This database picks up where the Social Security Death Index (SSDI) leaves off by providing more details than those included in the SSDI. It includes information filed with the Social Security Administration through the application or claims process, including valuable details such as birth date, birth place, and parents’ names. While you will not find everybody who is listed in the SSDI in this database, data has been extracted for more than 49 million people.
"Information you may find includes:
  • applicant's full name
  • Social Security Number (SSN)
  • date and place of birth
  • citizenship
  • sex
  • father's name
  • mother's maiden name
  • race/ethnic description (optional)
"You may also find details on changes made to the applicant's record, including name changes or information on claims that were recorded. The most common types of claims noted include: Original SSN (when the original application was submitted to obtain a SSN), Life Claim (when a claim was made for disability or retirement benefits), Death Claim (when a claim was made by a surviving family member for death or survivor benefits), and Duplicate SSN (usually used when an application was made to replace a SS card, it may also indicate a change in SSN or that more than one SSN was assigned).
"Note: Some records may include unusual abbreviations or truncated entries for county and other names or punctuation errors in the data. These are in the original; we have not altered the text."

This record collection currently has 134,351,603 records for 49 million Social Security application and claim records.  It is an indexed collection without record images.  

I entered several exact surnames in the "Last Name" search field and found:

*  1,319 for "Seaver"
*  335 for "Seavers"
*  197 for "Seever"
*  587 for "Seevers"
*  633 for "Sever"
*  706 for "Severs"

*  218 for "Carringer"
*  28 for "Caringer"

*  183 for "Vaux"

*  267 for "Auble"

*  867,.042 for "Smith"

Here is an example of a record summary from this collection:

It is important to understand what this collection represents and includes.  Not every Social Security application, and not every claim, is included in this collection.  However, there are many applications and claims for which all (or some) of the full applicant name, other applicant names, birth dates, birth places, death dates, death places, parents names, and social security card numbers are provided.

At a minimum, it provides a clue that the person applied for and received a social security card, and may have collected benefits.  The information on the record in the collection can be used to obtain an image of the Social Security Application filled out by the person (or a representative) from the Social Security Administration for a deceased individual, with some privacy restrictions on parents names, for a fee of $29 (use the form at https://secure.ssa.gov/apps9/eFOIA-FEWeb/internet/main.jsp).

This is strictly a 20th (and 21st) century record, and as such can be very useful to find birth dates and places, death dates, alternate applicant names, and parents names.

For those interested in mining this record collection for Hints of persons in their Ancestry Member Tree, the Ancestry.com database number is 60901.  Currently, I have over 2,000 Hints for persons in my Ancestry Member Tree who are indexed in this record collection.  I work on them occasionally, adding content and source citations to this record collection to my RootsMagic family tree.

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NOTE:  Tuesday's Tips is a genealogy blog meme intended to provide information about a resource helpful to genealogists and family historians, especially in the online genea-world.  

The URL for this post is: 
https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/tuesdays-tip-ancestrycom-collection-for.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Monday Genea-Pourri - Week Ending 20 October 2019

Here are the highlights of my family history and genealogy related activities over the past week:

1)  Moderated the Chula Vista Genealogical Society (CVGS) DNA Interest Group Meeting  on Wednesday with 12 attendees.  I reported on the Ancestry Health announcement, the FamilyTreeDNA health announcement, the 23andMe updated ethnicity and family tree, the MyHeritagwe Live 2019 DNA videos, the RootsTech London livestreams and handouts, and my Newton/Brigham DNA matches.  The attendees reported on the status of their DNA test results and analyses.  

2)  Participated in Mondays With Myrt today.  The panel discussed the Zoom webinar and meetings features, RootsTech London, the Society of Genealogists, the Irish Genealogy site with free BMD records, removal of FamilySearch records, and the Newspapers.com obituary hints.  

3)  Finished up my new presentation on "Researching in Historical Newspapers" which I will give at the 30 October CVGS general meeting.  I still need to do the syllabus.

4)  Watched one MyHeritage Live 2019 video -  The Worldwide DNA Web by Alon Diament Carmel. 

5)  Wrote and posted a biographical sketch of 6th great-grandmother #511 Sarah (Campbell) Rolfe (1746-1838) for my 52 Ancestors biographical sketch on Friday.  This completes my known 6th great-grandparents and closer ancestors.


7)  Ancestry added about 4,000 record hints for the Newspapers.com Obituary Index and I started resolving them, adding content and sources to my RootsMagic tree.  I used the mining tool for a specific Ancestry record collection.

8) There were several sessions working in the RootsMagic software program to match with and update FamilySearch Family Tree profiles for Seaver families and my ancestral families, with occasional additions to the RootsMagic profiles. I have matched 33,163 of my RootsMagic persons with FSFT.

9)  Used Web Hints and Record Matches from Ancestry, MyHeritage, Findmypast and FamilySearch to add content and sources to my RootsMagic profiles.  I now have 55,167 persons in my RootsMagic file, and 111,073 source citations.   I TreeShared thrice this week updating 276 profiles, and I resolved 1105 Ancestry Hints.  I've fallen behind on the Ancestry Record Hints with 120,220 to be resolved, but I work on them weekly.

10)  Added several more ThruLines to DNA matches to my RootsMagic file.  Added Notes to about 5 AncestryDNA matches.   Downloaded  new MyHeritageDNA shared cM match list and got it into a spreadsheet, hoping to find common ancestors for my matches.  Tried to obtain the Auto cluster analysis but it failed for some reason.

11) Wrote 17 Genea-Musings blog posts last week, of which two were a press release.  The most popular post last week was 
New Collection on Ancestry.com - Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800s to Current  
with over 472 views.


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The URL for this post is: 
https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/monday-genea-pourri-week-ending-20.html


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Using the "Mining Ancestry.com Hints From a Specific Collection" Tool

Over the past five years or so, several researchers have been using a known genealogy "tool" to isolate the Ancestry Record Hints in a specific record collection - my latest post was in June 2019 - see Changes to Mining Ancestry.com Hints by Specific Record Collection - Updated!

The process is actually quite simple:

1)  You have to have an Ancestry Member Tree and an Ancestry account.

2)  You need to know your Ancestry Member tree number (each Ancestry Tree has a unique identifying number) - with your Ancestry Member Tree open, look at the browser address for an up to 9 digit number.  Here is my browser address for my tree:

https://www.ancestry.com/family-tree/tree/113002012/family

The tree number ("treenumb") for my tree is 113002012 

3)  You need to know the Ancestry database number ("dbas") for the record collection of interest.  Go to the Ancestry Card Catalog (https://www.ancestry.com/search/collections/catalog/#) and find that record collection.  The easiest way is to roll your mouse over the title and look in the lower left-hand corner of your screen (at least on Windows computers), and the database number is shown (4 or 5 digits).  Another method is to search your selected database, select one of the matches, and look in the match URL in your web browser for the "dbid=dbas" number.  Write down the "dbas" number.

For this study, I want to "mine" the records in the new Ancestry collection "Newspapers.com Obituary Index, 1800's-Current" which is database number ("dbas") 61843.

4)  Now you are ready to search for Ancestry Record Hints in your Ancestry Member Tree for the specific database of interest.

The special URL to use is this:

https://www.ancestry.com/hints/tree/treenumb/hints?hf=record&hs=last&hdbid=dbas

Insert your tree number and the specific database number into your URL.  For my tree and the Newspapers.com database, my URL looks like this:

https://www.ancestry.com/hints/tree/113002012/hints?hf=record&hs=last&hdbid=61843

(Note that if you use my URL above and press Enter it will not work - it refers to my Tree which you cannot access in this way.)

Copy the special URL above into your web browser, but do not press "Enter."  Use your cursor and position it in the URL and replace "Treenumb" with your tree number, and replace "dbas" with your selected database number.

Then press Enter.  You should see a list of Record Hints for your Ancestry Member Tree people in that specific database.  

I recommend that you Bookmark (in Windows) the URL so you don't have to do this process again.  I recommend that you Bookmark this blog post so that you can easily find this process again.

5) When I hit Enter, my screen looks like this for the "Newspapers.com Obituaries Index, 1800s-current" collection:


Although the "Records" item on the left-hand side of the screen says I have 120,144 Hints, that is for ALL Record Hints, not for just this selected collection.

To determine how many you have for the specific collection, look in the upper right corner of the screen between the left (<) and right carats (>) for the number of pages (in the screen above, the "1 of 193" indicator).  I have 193 pages, which with 20 results per page works out to be about 3,860 Record Hints for this specific database.

The results are presented alphabetically in last name, first name order.  

I, and others, have listed some of the most popular Ancestry database numbers - see my list at   Changes to Mining Ancestry.com Hints by Specific Record Collection.  

6)  One more caveat:  Ancestry.com does not provide all of the Record Hints for all of your Ancestry Member Tree people at one time.  They provide them in two major ways:

*  When you access a tree person, or search for records from within a tree profile, or change a tree profile, the Hint algorithm works.

*  Every day, Ancestry provides a limited number of Record Hints for random tree persons in your Ancestry Member Tree. 

I have been accessing hundreds of tree persons each week, mainly using RootsMagic WebHints and TreeShare, and Ancestry added over 4,000 Hints for the Newspapers.com Obituaries Index database for my 55,000 Ancestry Member Tree profiles in the past five days.  Other researchers have reported being inundated by these Hints also.

However, when I accessed one of my old trees, with over 44,000 profiles, I had received less than 20 Hints from this database.  It seems like you have to be active on Ancestry Member Trees to stimulate a lot of Hints.  So, be active in your tree! 

There are probably records in the database for other persons in my Ancestry Member Tree who haven't been "Hinted" yet by Ancestry for this specific database.  So I need to check back occasionally, but I can't isolate the new Hints on the list. 

7)  I will write another post for how I use these Hints to add content to my Ancestry Member Tree profiles. 

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Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/using-mining-ancestrycom-hints-from.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Amanuensis Monday -- 1775 Deed of Simon Gates Selling Land to Josiah Kendall Jr. in Worcester County, Massachusetts

This week's document for Amanuensis Monday is a 1775 deed of  Simon Gates selling land to Josiah Kendall Jr. in Westminster, Massachusetts in the Worcester County, Massachusetts Land Records: 

[Volume 73, pages 352- 353]

[Volume 73, pages 354- 355]

The transcription of this deed is:

[page 353 at bottom of right-hand page]
[in left margin]

Gates

to 
Kendall

[body of text]


To all People to whom these Presents Come Greeting Know ye that I Simon

Gates of Westminster in the Province of the Massachusetts Bay and in the County
of Worcester yeoman for and in Consideration of the sum of thirty two Pounds lawfull money to me in Hand before the Ensealing hereof well and truly paid by
Josiah Kendall Jun^r of Lancaster and in the Province and County aforesaid
yeoman the Receipt whereof I do hereby acknowledge and my self thereof
fully satisfyed acquit and discharge him the said Josiah Kendall his Execut-
tors and administrators for by these Presents have given granted bargained
sold aliened conveyed & confirmed and by these Presents do freely fully and
absolutely give grant bargain sell aliene convey and confirm unto him the

[page 354]

said Josiah Kendall his Heirs and assigns forever a certain Tract or
Parcel of Land Situate in Westminster in said County Forty five
acres of the West Side of the Lott Number 27 the second Division
belonging to the original Lott 103 to be taken off the West side of s^d
Lott with a Parrellel Line of said Lott as it appears by the Proprietors
Book of Records.  To Have and to Hold the said granted and bargained
Premises with all the Appurtenances Priviledges & Comodities
to the same belonging or in any wise appertaining to him the
said Josiah Kendall his Heirs and assigns that before the Ensealing
hereof I am the true sole and lawfull owner of the above bargained
Premises and am lawfully seized and possessed of y^e same and
have in good Right full Power and lawfull authority to grant
and bargain sell convey and confirm unto him the said Josiah
Kendall his Heirs and assigns forever.  Furthermore, I the said
Simon Gates for my self my Heirs Executors and administrators
do Covenant and engage the above demised Premises to him the said
Josiah Kendall his Heirs & assigns against the Lawfull Claims
or Demands of any Person or Persons whatsoever forever hereafter
to warrant secure and defend by these Presents.  In witness whereof
I have hereunto sett my Hand and seal this Eleventh Day of April
in the fourteenth year of his majestys Reign Anno Domini 1775,
Simon Gates {seal} Signed Sealed and delivered in Presence of us
Samuel Willard  Abijah Willard.  Worcester ss April y^e 11^h 1775.
Simon Gates personally appeared before me and acknowledged
this Instrument to be his free act & Deed.
                                                             Abijah Willard Just^o Peace
Oct^r 27^th 1775  Rec^d and accordingly Entred ^ Ex^d pr Tim^o Paine Reg^r.

The source citation for this recorded deed is:

"Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org : accessed 13 January 2015), Worcester County, "Deeds, 1774-1776, Vol. 73-74," Volume 73, Pages 353-354, images 194-195 of 599, Deed of
Simon Gates to Josiah Kendall Jr., executed 11 April 1775, recorded 27 October 1775; citing records in land offices and county courthouses, statewide in Massachusetts.

This is the second recorded deed found for Simon Gates of Westminster, Massachusetts, and it is for the west 45 acres of Lot 27 of the second division in Westminster.  Simon Gates bought 60 acres in this Lot for 30 pounds on the same day in another deed and in this deed sells the west 45 acres to Josiah Kendall for 32 pounds.   Note that this deed was executed one week before the Revolutionary War started at Lexington and Concord.

Simon Gates (1739-1803), son of Amos and Mary (Hubbard) Gates, who married Susanna Reed (1745-1833) in 1766, is my 5th great-grandfather.  I am descended from their son, Nathan Gates (1767-1830) who married Abigail Knowlton (1774-1855) in 1790.

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NOTE:  Genea-blogger John Newmark (who writes the excellent  TransylvanianDutch blog) started a Monday blog theme years ago called "Amanuensis Monday."  John offers this definition for "amanuensis:" 


"A person employed to write what another dictates or to copy what has been written by another."

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/amanuensis-monday-1775-deed-of-simon_21.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Sunday, October 20, 2019

Best of the Genea-Blogs - 13 to 19 October 2019

Dozens of genealogy and family history bloggers write thousands of posts every week about their research, their families, and their interests. I appreciate each one of them and their efforts.

My criteria for "Best of ..." are pretty simple - I pick posts that advance knowledge about genealogy and family history, address current genealogy issues, provide personal family history, are funny or are poignant. I don't list posts destined for daily blog prompts or meme submissions (but I do include summaries of them), or my own posts.


Here are my picks for great reads from the genealogy blogs for this past week:


*  Why Is It Not on The Map? How Learning History Aids Your Genealogy by Jim Beidler on Legacy Tree Genealogists.

DNA Painter Instructions and Resources by Roberta Estes on DNAeXplained - Genetic Genealogy.

Dress Like a Pilgrim by Heather Wilkinson Rojo on Nutfield Genealogy.

Big Changes at LivingDNA by Debbie Kennett on Cruwys News.

3 Unexpected Things I Learned in Downsizing by Amy Johnson Crow on Amy Johnson Crow.

The Archive Lady:  Researching Our Female Ancestors by Melissa Barker on Abundant Genealogy.

7 Practical Reasons to Preserve First by Denise Levenick on The Family Curator.

3 Reasons To Do Your Own One-Name Study by DiAnn Iamarino on Fortify Your Family Tree.

Everyone Needs a FAN by Gena Philibert-Ortega on Legacy News.

*  Hit a Genetic Genealogy Home Run Using Your Double-Sided Two-Faced Chromosomes While Avoiding Imposters by Roberta Estes on DNAeXplained -- Genetic Genealogy.

Family History & Getting Things Done: Part 4: Reflecting by Diana Elder on Family Locket.

Here are pick posts by other geneabloggers this week:

*  Friday's Family History Finds by Linda Stufflebean on Empty Branches on the Family Tree.

*  Friday Fossicking - 18th Oct 2019 by Crissouli on That Moment in Time.


This Week's Creme de la Creme -- October 19, 2019  by Gail Dever on Genealogy a la Carte,

Readers are encouraged to go to the blogs listed above and    read their articles, and add their blogs to your Favorites, Feedly, another RSS feed, or email if you like what you read. Please make a comment to them also - all bloggers appreciate feedback on what they write.


Did I miss a great genealogy blog post? Tell me! I currently am reading posts from over 900 genealogy bloggers using Feedly, but I still miss quite a few it seems.


Read past Best of the Genea-Blogs posts here.


                     =======================================================

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2019/10/best-of-genea-blogs-13-to-19-october.html

Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


Added and Updated Ancestry.com Record Collections - Week of 13 to 19 October 2019

The following record collections were listed on the Ancestry Card Catalog list on Ancestry.com during the period from 13 to 19 October 2019 

The ADDED and Updated record collections are:

1870 United States Federal Census; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/17/2019

Zacatecas, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1861-1947; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/16/2019

Federal District, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1861-1931; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/16/2019

Federal District, Mexico, Civil Registration Deaths, 1861-1987; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/16/2019

Michoacan, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1859-1934; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/16/2019

Massachusetts, Boston Archdiocese Roman Catholic Sacramental Records, 1789-1900; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/14/2019

Mexico, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1861-1939; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/14/2019

Jalisco, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1857-1948; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/14/2019

Tlaxcala, Mexico, Civil Registration Births, 1867-1927; indexed records with record images, Updated 10/14/2019

==========================================

The complete Ancestry.com Card Catalog is at    http://search.ancestry.com/search/CardCatalog.aspx.  

By my count, there were 0 NEW collections ADDED this past week, per the list above.  There are now 32,694 collections available as of 19 October, an increase of  0 from last week.


                         ==============================================

Disclosure:  I have had a fully paid Ancestry.com subscription since 2000.  Ancestry.com has provided material considerations for travel expenses to meetings, and has hosted events and meals that I have attended in Salt Lake City, in past years.


Copyright (c) 2019, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.