Friday, May 26, 2017

Genealogy News Bytes - 26 May 2017


Some of the genealogy news items across my desktop the last two days include:

*  The SCGS Genealogy Jamboree Mobile App for iOS and Android is available for download to your device (Search for SCGS2017).  Users can stay organized, receive information, personalize your schedule, take notes, obtain handouts, connect with colleagues, and more.  See  http://genealogyjamboree.blogspot.com/2017/05/the-jamboree-2107-mobile-app-is-now.html

*  Legacy Family Tree has updated their new Version 9 family tree software (to 9.0.0.182) - see  http://news.legacyfamilytree.com/legacy_news/2017/05/free-legacy-family-tree-update-now-available-version-900182.html

*  Diane Richard on the Upfront With NGS blog tells us that Library of Congress has put Sanborn Insurance Maps Online (FREE for anyone to access!).

*  World War II Records on www.Fold3.com are FREE through 29 May 2017 in honor of Memorial Day.  See https://go.fold3.com/wwii/.

*  All Military Records on Ancestry.com are FREE through 29 May 2017 in honor of Memorial Day.  See http://www.ancestry.com/cs/militaryrecords

*  Findmypast added records from Surrey, Derbyshire, Essex, Sussex, Ireland, Australia and Vermont this week - see list and links here.

*  TheGenealogist added 4.5 million records to their Passenger Lists Collection - see https://www.thegenealogist.co.uk/featuredarticles/2017/ancestral-voyages-511/

*  Four webinars from the Surname Society 2017 Annual Conference have been added to the Family Tree Webinars archives - see http://news.legacyfamilytree.com/legacy_news/2017/05/surname-society-webinars-available-in-the-legacy-family-tree-library.html for speakers and topics.

*  A new addition to the Family Tree Webinars archive this week is "WikiTree Free for All Without a Free-for-All" by Eowyn Langhoff (free until 31 May) - see https://familytreewebinars.com/download.php?webinar_id=581.

*  The DeartMYRTLE YouTube Channel has the May 22nd "Mondays With Myrt" Hangout on Air discussed blogging, personal history, Tony Proctor's interactive trees, and more.  See https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eKpe5L_J2Uk

*  The BYU Family History Library YouTube Channel has a new video by James Tanner titled "Critical Analysis of Researching in Depth" - see https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qtZnKOBIj10

*  The Dallas Genealogical Society is having a two-day Summer Seminar - “Sources, Storytelling & DNA” with featured speakers Lisa Louise Cooke, Sunny Morton, and Diahan Southard. To be held August 4 and 5, topics of the eight sessions cover Google tools (including Google Earth), genetic genealogy, writing your story, newspapers and religious records research methodologies, and incorporating videos into your family history.  See  http://dallasgenealogy.com/dgs/meetings-events/seminars/2017-summer-seminar/

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The URL for this post is:  

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday, 26 May 2017

I received this information from Findmypast today:

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New Records Available To Search This Findmypast Friday

There are over 249,000 records are available to search this Findmypast Friday, including;

Surrey institutional records 1788-1939

Explore over 200,000 assorted records from 16 institutions across the English county of Surrey, including poor law unions, workhouses, schools, infirmaries, goals and more. Each result will provide you with a transcript of key details from the source material. The records cover 13 places in Surrey: Addlestone, Chertsey, Cobham, Dorking, Farnham, Godstone, Guildford, Hambledon, Redhill, Richmond Upon Thames, Southwark, Warlingham, and Woking. The amount and nature of the information recorded will vary depending on the type of source material. Most will reveal a combination of your ancestor's occupation, marital status and home parish as well as dates relating to their birth, baptism, death and the event that was being recorded.

Vermont, Enrolled Militia Records 1861-1867

Search over 4,300 records to find out if your Vermont ancestors enrolled in the state militia. Vermont, located in the northeastern United States, has a long tradition of local militias fighting for the country. The state passed an act in 1844 that stipulated that all adult men who were eligible for service in the state militia were recorded by the town clerk in a register that was then sent to the state government. These records cover most of the 1860s, a particularly interesting time for the state as Vermont fought with the Union during the American Civil War. While most records in this collection are enlistment records, several personal war sketches and burial records are also included.

Essex Baptism Index 1538-1917

Over 32,000 records covering 50 parishes across the county have been added to the Essex Baptism index. Each record contains a transcript of original source material. The amount of information listed may vary but generally records will include the child's name, birth date, birth place, baptism date, baptism place, denomination, parent's names and father's occupation.

Australian Capital Territory Deaths

Over 2,000 records have been added to our collection of Australian Capital Territory Deaths. Each record includes a transcript of the original source material that will reveal your ancestor's date of death and parent's names. Transcripts will also include the registration number, information that can be used to order a copy of the original certificate from the Office of Regulatory Services.

Sussex, Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices

Over 186,000 records have been added to our collection of Eastbourne Gazette Newspaper Notices. This indexed collection includes names found in the paper's family notices section (announcements of births, marriages and deaths) as well as other reports on events such as divorces, murders, tragedies, shipwrecks, lynchings and paternity cases. The newspaper reported on stories in Sussex, but also internationally. Stories from Ireland to Switzerland and the USA can be found by using the Keyword search to discover indexed reports from specific countries.

Derbyshire Hospital Admissions and Deaths 1855-1913

Over 800 records have been added to our collection of Derbyshire Hospital Admissions & Deaths. The collection now contains over 5,000 records taken from two different sources: Derbyshire Royal Infirmary, Deaths 1892 – 1912 and Victoria Memorial Cottage Hospital, Ashbourne Admissions 1899 – 1913. Each record includes a transcript produced by the Ancestral Archives of Derbyshire. Records can include the patient's admission date, reason for admission, condition after admission, marital status, residence, rank or profession, date of discharge or death and cause of death.

Irish Newspapers

Over 900 new articles and one brand new title have been added to our collection of historic Irish newspapers. This month's new title, The Monitor, and Missionary Chronicle, of the Reformed Presbyterian Church in Ireland currently consists of twenty 24-26 page editions of the monthly publication dating from August 1853 to April 1855. 

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Disclosure:  I have a complimentary Findmypast.com subscription, courtesy of Findmypast.  That does not affect my objectivity in discussing and evaluating their product.

The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/new-records-available-to-search-this_26.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


52 Ancestors - Week 177: #256 Robert Seaver (1702-1752) of Massachusetts

Here is my 52 Ancestors biography for week #177 (starting the 6th great-grandparents):

Robert Seaver (1702-1752)  is #256 on my Ahnentafel List, my 6th great-grandfather, who married #257 Eunice Rayment (1703-1772) in 1726, in Boston, Massachusetts.


I am descended through:

*  their son, #128 Norman Seaver (1734-1787) who married #129 Sarah Read (1736-1809) in 1755.
*  their son, #64 Benjamin Seaver (1757-1816) who married #65 Martha Whitney (1763-1832) in 1783.
*  their son #32 Benjamin Seaver (1791-1825) who married #33 Abigail Gates (1797-1867) in 1817.
*  their son #16 Isaac Seaver (1823-1901) who married #17 Lucretia Townsend Smith (1828-1884) in 1851.
*  their son #8 Frank Walton Seaver (1852-1922) who married #9 Hattie Louisa Hildreth (1857-1920) in 1874.
*  their son #4 Frederick Walton Seaver (1876-1942) who married #5 Alma Bessie richmond (1882-1962) in 1900.
*  their son #2 Frederick Walton Seaver (1911-1983) who married #3 Betty Virginia Carringer (1919-2002) in 1942.
*  their son #1 Randall Jeffrey Seaver (1943-living)

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1)  PERSON (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

*  Name:                      Robert Seaver[1–5]
*  Alternate Name:      Robard Severs[6]
*  Alternate Name:      Robert Sever[7–16]  
  
*  Sex:                         Male   

*  Father:                     Joseph Seaver (1672-1754)   
*  Mother:                   Mary Read (1679-    )  
   

2)  INDIVIDUAL EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
   
*  Birth:                      29 October 1702, Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[6]   
*  Deed:                      19 January 1737 (age 34), bought 100 acres of upland and pasture in Framingham for 500 pounds from Thomas Frost of Framingham; Framingham, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[2]   
*  Deed:                      9 September 1740 (age 37), sold 100 acres of land in Framingham to the Manufactory Company of Roxbury for 75 pounds; Framingham, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[3]   
*  Deed:                      20 October 1740 (age 37), received 5 acres of land in Sudbury from Joseph Seaver for love and affection; Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[7]   
*  Deed:                      20 January 1741 (age 38), sold 4 acres of land in Sudbury to Isaac Gibbs of Sudbury for 140 pounds; Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[8]   
*  Deed:                      19 April 1742 (age 39), sold 4 acres of land in Sudbury to Isaac Read for 120 pounds; Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[9]   
*  Military:                 1745 (about age 43), served in Captain Ephraim Baker's company of Sir William Pepperell's regiment; Louisbourg, Nova Scotia, Canada[4]   
*  Deed:                      13 March 1746/7 (age 44), sold 100 acres of land in Framingham to Robert Montgomery for 570 pounds; Framingham, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[10]   
*  Petition:                 1748 (about age 46), Sudbury, Middlesex, Massachusetts, United States[11]   
*  Deed:                     20 November 1750 (age 48), bought Lot 70 in Westminster  from Josiah Brown for 60 pounds; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[5]   
*  Death:                    before 26 September 1752 (before age 49), Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[12]   
*  Administration:     26 September 1752 (age 49), inventory taken; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[12]   
*  Deed:                     7 April 1755 (age 52), estate sold Lot 70 (60 acres) to Luke Brown for 20 pounds and to Ezra Taylor for 54 pounds; Westminster, Worcester, Massachusetts, United States[13]  
3)  SHARED EVENTS (with source citations as indicated in brackets):
*  Spouse 1:               Eunice Rayment (1707-1772)   
*  Marriage Intentions:  19 August 1726 (age 23), Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States[14]
*  Marriage:              2 September 1726 (age 23), Boston, Suffolk, Massachusetts, United States[15]   
*  Child 1:                 Joseph Seaver (1727-    )   
*  Child 2:                 Benjamin Seaver (1728-    )   
*  Child 3:                 Thankful Seaver (1731-    )   
*  Child 4:                 Norman Seaver (1734-1787)   
*  Child 5:                 Hannah Seaver (1736-    )   
*  Child 6:                 Moses Seaver (1738-1809)   
*  Child 7:                 Robert Seaver (1743-1828)   
*  Child 8:                 Samuel Seaver (1747-1830)   
*  Child 9:                 John Seaver (1752-    )  

4)  NOTES (with source citations as indicated in brackets):

"Robard Severs" was born 29 October 1702 in Sudbury, Massachusetts to Joseph and Mary (Read) "Severs,"[6] their oldest child.

He married on 2 September 1726 in Boston, Massachusetts to Eunice Rayment of Marblehead[15].  They had eight children, but only four were recorded in town record books in Framingham and Sudbury, Massachusetts..  

A short biography of Robert Seaver was included in William Richard Cutter's book New England Families, genealogical and memorial, Volume 1[1]:

"(IV) Robert, son of Joseph Seaver, was born in 1703, died probably in early 1752.  He and his two oldest sons enlisted in the first Louisburg expedition and were at the surrender of the fortress, June 28, 1745.  In October 1748, his house in Sudbury was burned, and he appealed for help from the colonial legislature.  Soon after this he moved to Narragansett No. 2, settling upon right lot No. 70 in the southeast part of the town.  This land he bought of Josiah Brown of Sudbury on November 20, 1750.  In the spring of 1751 he had 'a frame of a house, 3 acres of land fenced, 2 cleared and 1 broken up ready for planting.'  In 1755 his widow sold his land to Luke Brown, but she continued to live in Westminster until her death in 1773 or 1774.  He married, September 2, 1726, Eunice Norman, of Boston, daughter of Captain Norman, whose ship was wrecked outside of Boston Harbor, on the rocky ledge since known as Norman's Woe.  Children:  Joseph, born in Sudbury, June 10, 1727; Benjamin, born in Framingham, October 8, 1728; Thankful, Framingham, October 6, 1731; Norman, mentioned below; Hannah; Samuel, born in Sudbury, April 8, 1747."

Robert Sever and his two oldest sons were in Captain Ephraim Baker's company of Sir William Pepperell's regiment at the taking of the fortress at Louisbourg on Cape Breton Island on 28 June 1745 during the French and Indian War[4].  Either Joseph or Benjamin were killed there (it is not clear which, since there are no records for either of them after 1745).

Robert Sever of Framingham, yeoman, bought land in Framingham for 500 pounds in bills of credit from Thomas Frost of Framingham on 19 January 1737[2].  The land comprised 100 acres of upland and pasture in Framingham.  The land was bounded northwesterly by land of Hezekiah Stone, northerly by land of Thomas Frost and Nathaniel Gibbs, easterly by Ebenezer and James Boutal, and southerly by Christopher Nixson.

Robert Sever, bricklayer of Framingham, and his wife Eunice,  sold 100 acres of land in Framingham for 75 pounds in bills of credit to the Manufactory Company headed by Robert Auchmuty of Roxbury on 9 September 1740[3].  Robert Sever became a partner in the company as a condition of the sale.  The land was the parcel bought from Thomas Frost.

Robert Sever of Framingham, husbandman, received 5 acres of land in Sudbury from his father, Joseph Sever, yeoman of Framingham, for many good causes and considerations, and especially in fatherly love and affection, on 20 October 1740[7].  The land was meadowland near West Brook, bounded by the brook, land of Joseph Parmenter, Paul Brintnal, and Elisha How, and was valued at 150 pounds in bills of credit.

On 20 January 1741, Robert Sever of Framingham sold 4 acres of land in Sudbury to Isaac Gibbs of Sudbury for 140 pounds in currant money[8]. The land was meadowland bounded by lands of Elisha How and Paul Brintnall 29 May 1741.

Robert Sever, husbandman of Sudbury, sold land in Sudbury to Isaac Read, yeoman of Sudbury, for 120 pounds on 19 April 1742[9].  The land was on the west side of the Sudbury River and contained 4 and a quarter acres of meadow, bounded easterly by Elisha How, northerly by Paul Brintnal, westerly by Nathan Goodenow and Josiah Richardson, and southerly by a brook.

Robert Sever, bricklayer of Framingham, sold 100 acres of land in Framingham to Robert Montgomery for 570 pounds of old tenor bills on 13 March 1746/7[10].  The land and meadows contained a dwelling house and was bounded by land of Belcher, Frost, and Stratton.  The deed was also signed by Eunice Sever.

The Robert Seaver family lived near the town line dividing Sudbury and Framingham.  He was a bricklayer by trade.  In October, 1748 his house at Sudbury was consumed by fire.  He petitioned the General Court for relief as follows[11]:

"My house was burned and consumed all the little substance I had in the world, it being in movables and bonds and bills of credit, and amongst the money your petitioner lost was one 8 pd one 3 pd and one 3 pc and one 4 pd all of this Province old Tenor."

He stated the fact that he and his sons were at the taking of Louisbourg, "and that one of them is there still."  The court granted him 3 pounds 15 shillings in respect of his service.

Robert Seaver moved his family to Narragansett No. 2 (which was part of the lands assigned to soldiers of the Indian Wars), which was later called Westminster[4].  He settled on Lot 70 located in the southeast part of town on the highland nearly a mile northeast of the outlet to Wachusett Lake, having purchased the lot from Josiah Brown of Sudbury on 20 November 1750 for 60 pounds[5]. In the spring of 1751, he had a frame house, three acres of land fenced, two acres cleared and one acre broken for planting[16].

Robert Sever, bricklayer of Narragansett No. 2,  probably died in early 1752, intestate, and his probate records are in Worcester County Probate Packet 52,920[12].  Eunice Seaver was appointed administratrix.  An inventory was taken by Oliver Wilder, David Hoar and Joseph Miller on 26 September 1752.  The inventory included:

The Real Estate                                                                   £66:13:04
To Personal Estate:
To one note of Hand 8/ & to apparel 24/1                              1:12:01
To bedding and furniture 40/
To 2 chests one old Corboard 8/                                             2:08:00
To five old chairs one old Table 5/  To one spining wheel 6/ 0:11:00
To one Tubb one nail, one Pigon 5/1                                           5:01
To pewter and wooden Platts                                                       8:08
To Two Iron Potts one frying pan                                                4:60
To old axes one shavy two stone hammers                                13:05
to Two Trowells 3/ to old books and shoes 4/4                           7:04
to one Staple and Ring and two Cart Boxes one Chain               9:04
To one narrow hoe and old iron                                                   1:08
To one plow & five plow irons                                                  16:00
To Knives and forks and Razor                                                   1:02
To Bible and other books 12/6                                                  12:06
To one Saddle one pitch fork two Rakes                                   14:11
To Shovell 2/  To one yoke of oxen £8:13:4                          8:15:04
To Two Cows L6   To one Horse £6:5/                                12:05:00
To Two Calves 20/  To Hay £2:13:4                                      3:13:04
To Two Shoah 12/  To 4 thousand of brick 42/8                    2:14:08
To Bettle Ring 1/8  To 1750 feet of boards 35/                      1:16:08
To Seven Cherry Tree Boards and Logg                                     3:00
To three thousand of Shingles                                                1:04:00
----------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Entire estate:                                                                     £106:13:06

The debts apparently exceeded the value of the personal effects that could be sold, so Eunice sold the property to pay off the residual debts.  The 60 acres of land in Lot 70 were sold in two lots to Luke Brown of Worcester for 20 pounds and to Ezra Taylor on 7 April 1755 for a total of 54 pounds, 8 shillings, 10 pence[13].  Eunice Seaver's account was allowed on 21 August 1755[12].

5)  SOURCES
 
1. William Richard Cutter (compiler), New England Families, Genealogical and Memorial, Volume 1 (New York City :  Lewis Historical Publishing Company, 1913), page 221, Robert Seaver sketch.

2. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, FamilySearch (https://familysearch.org :, accessed 25 May 2017), Middlesex County, Volume 42, page 26, Thomas Frost to Robert Seaver, recorded 16 September 1740; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,023.

3. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Middlesex County, Volume 42, page 79, Robert Seaver to Manufactory Company, recorded 26 October 1740; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,023.

4. Alfred Sereno Hudson, The History of Sudbury, Massachusetts, 1638-1889 (Boston, Mass. : Town of Sudbury, 1889), page 210, Robert Seaver's military service.

5. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Worcester County, Volume 35, page 342, Josiah Brown to Robert Seaver to Robert Montgomery, recorded 17 March 1746/7; also on FHL Microfilm 0,843,173.

6. Vital Records of Sudbury, Massachusetts to the year 1850 (Boston, Mass. : New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1903), Births, page 130, Robard Severs entry, son of Joseph and Mary.

7. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Middlesex County, Volume 42, page 27, Joseph Sever to Robert Sever, recorded 29 October 1740; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,023.

8. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Middlesex County, Volume 42, page 500, Robert Sever to Isaac Gibbs, recorded 29 May 1741; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,023.

9. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Middlesex County, Volume 45, page 59, Robert Sever to Isaac Read, recorded 25 February 1744; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,025.

10. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017, Middlesex County, Volume 46, page 169, Robert Sever to Robert Montgomery, recorded 17 March 1746/7; also on FHL Microfilm 0,554,025.

11. Alfred Sereno Hudson, The History of Sudbury, Massachusetts, 1638-1889 (Boston, Mass. : Town of Sudbury, 1889), pages 219-220, Robert Sever's petition.

12. "Worcester County, MA: Probate File Papers, 1731-1881," digital images, New England Historic Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (http://www.americanancestors.org), Probate Packet 52,920, Robert Sever.

13. "Massachusetts, Land Records, 1620-1986," digital images, FamilySearch, accessed 25 May 2017), Worcester County, Volume 36, page 270 and 281, Robert Seaver estate to Luke Brown and Ezra Taylor, recorded 7 April 1755; also on FHL Microfilm 0,843,173.

14. Massachusetts, Town and Vital Records, 1620-1988, digital images, Ancestry.com (http://www.ancestry.com), Boston, "Marriage Publications, 1713-1728, Vol. 2," page 252 (image 128 of 151), Robert Sever and Eunice Rayment entry.

15. Massachusetts, Town Records, 1620-1988, digital images, Ancestry.com, Boston, "Births, Marriages and Deaths" page 259 (image 2073 of 60705), Robert Sever and Eunice Rayment entry.

16. William Sweetzer Heywood,  History of Westminster, Massachusetts:  (first named Narragansett no. 2) from the date of the original grant of the township to the present time, 1728-1893 ; with a biographic -genealogical register of its principal families  (Lowell, Mass. : Vox Populi Press, 1893), page 88, Robert Sever entry.

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NOTE:  Amy Johnson Crow suggested a weekly blog theme of "52 Ancestors" in her blog post Challenge:  52 Ancestors in 52 Weeks on the No Story Too Small blog.  I have extended this theme in 2017 to 208 Ancestors in 208 Weeks.

NOTE:  This completes the list of 5th great-grandparents.  I will start on the 6th great-grandparents next week.  This generation may take two years or more to complete.


Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Thursday, May 25, 2017

Seavers in the News -- Dr. R.N. Seaver is Ill in 1905

It's time for another episode of "Seavers in the News" wherein I try to find obituaries and stories of persons named Seaver that are interesting, fun or macabre.

This week's article is an article about Dr. R. N. Seaver in the Altoona [Penn.] Mirror newspaper dated 4 April 1905 found on Ancestry.com:




The transcription of this record is:

"Prominent Corry Doctor Stricken

"Corry, Pa.,  April 4. -- Dr. R.N. Seaver, one of the prominent men in state, member of the soldier's pension examining board, was stricken with apoplexy in his office and is now at the point of death."

The source citation for this record is:

"Prominent Corry Doctor Stricken," Altoona [Penn.] Mirror, Tuesday, 4 April 1905, page 8, column 6, Dr. R.N. Seaver article; indexed database and digital images,  Ancestry.com   (http://www.ancestry.com : accessed 25 May  2017).

I looked in my RootsMagic database, and found Randolph Nelson Seaver (1847-1907) in my database, with the death listed in Minnesota in 1907.  So perhaps he didn't die in 1905 after his apoplexy attack?  

I searched on Ancestry for him, and easily found Randolph N. Seaver in the 1900 U.S. Census in Corry, Erie County, Pennsylvania, and there was a suggested record for a Find A Grave memorial for Dr. R. Nelson Seaver (1847-1905) buried in Corry, Pennsylvania, with a photo of his gravestone.  

A mention of him in the journal American Medicine (Volume 9, 1905, 22 April 1905, page 638, accessed in the "Compilation of Published Sources" collection on MyHeritage.com) says:

Randolph N. Seaver, aged 60, April 3, from cerebral hemorrhage, at his home in Corry, Pa. ; a graduate of the University of Worcester, medical department, Cleveland, O., in 1874."

So there's a death date.  The "Directory of Deceased American Physicians" database on Ancestry.com also provides a death date and a bit more information about his practice:


I could find no true obituary or other biography for Randolph Nelson Seaver in databases on Ancestry.com, MyHeritage.com, GenealogyBank, FindMyPast newspapers, FamilySearch Books, Google Books, Google Search, or Chronicling America.  I don't have a Newspaper.com subscription at this time.  You would think that someone prominent in the state would have an obituary and a biography in several regional newspapers.  Perhaps he did, and they have not been digitized, or I just haven't found it yet.

There may be a fuller biography in the "Directory of Deceased American Physicians" noted above.  I found the FamilySearch collection "United States, Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968) and it had two index cards with the information similar to the Ancestry database:



I am going to cite the FamilySearch index card because it is probably the best source of the information above.  The FamilySearch citation is:

"United States Deceased Physician File (AMA), 1864-1968," images,  FamilySearch  (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/3:1:3QSQ-G9QR-9LNS?cc=2061540&wc=M6Y8-F29%3A353102601 : 22 May 2014), > image 1316 of 3097; American Medical Association, Chicago.

In this process, I found a Pennsylvania Death Certificate for Randolph's wife, Nellie E. (Bracken) Seaver in 1939 and her Find A Grave memorial.  It's been a productive hour and a half finding information about this couple.  Alas, they seemed to have had no children.  FYI, Randolph Nelson Seaver is my third cousin 5 times removed.


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The URL for this post is: http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/seavers-in-news-dr-rn-seaver-is-ill-in.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.


1702 Birth Record of Robert Seaver (1702-1752) of Sudbury, Mass. -- Post #366 of Treasure Chest Thursday

It's Treasure Chest Thursday - time to look in my digital image files to see what treasures I can find for my family history and genealogy musings.

The treasure today is the  1702 birth record of "Robard Severs," son of Joseph and Mary, in Sudbury, Massachusetts:
 The birth record of "Robard Severs:"

The source citation for this record is:

Vital Records of Sudbury, Massachusetts to the year 1850 (Boston, Mass. : New England Historic Genealogical Society, 1903), Births, page 130, Robard Severs entry, son of Joseph and Mary.

Robert Seaver (1702-1752) was the first child of Joseph and Mary (Read) Seaver of sudbury, Massachusetts.  Her married Eunice Rayment (1707-1772) in 1726 in Boston, Massachusetts, and they had nine children in Framingham and Sudbury between 1727 and about 1752.  Robert and Eunice (Rayment) Seaver are my 6th great-grandparents through their son, Norman Seaver (1734-1787) who married Sarah Read (1736-1809) in 1755.

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Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Wednesday, May 24, 2017

Legacy Family Tree 9 Cause of Death Charts

I wanted to check out the new "Cause of Death" Legacy Family Tree chart in Version 9, but at first glance I found no way to obtain it.  I couldn't find a "how-to" in the Help section.  So I looked at the blog post "Legacy 9's New Cause of Death Charts" (posted 22 May 2017) and found the easy directions.

I had to open the Legacy Charting program on the "My Toolbar" menu in Legacy to see the Chart menu:


Down at the bottom is the "Special" category with "Cause of Death" highlighted.  I had to pick one of the other chart style on the "Special" line to get what I wanted - I clicked on "Ancestry" to get an Ancestry chart.  The other opportunities are for "Descendant," "Fan," "Hour Glass" or "Bow Tie."

When I picked "Ancestry," the chart opened and I increased the number of generations to 6:


If I printed this out, it would be on 9 sheets of 8.5 x 11 paper.

I zoomed in using my mouse wheel and scrolled down and sideways using the scroll bars, and saw the top of the chart


Each box has the person's name on the left side and the cause of death on the right side separated by a vertical line.  Here is a close-up of a part of the chart:


I figured out how to change the color scheme and made a four color Fan chart:


Now I need to go look at the records I have to add the Cause of Death for the folks I don't have information for.

By the way, in Legacy Family Tree you click on the "Notes" icon and enter the Cause of Death in the "Medical Notes" for each person (I had to look in the Help section for this!):


I like the Cause of Death chart - I hope that Legacy Family Tree creates several more charts like this using the "Special" style - Place of birth, Place of death, Place of marriage, Occupation, etc.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/legacy-family-tree-9-cause-of-death.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

2017 SCGS Genealogy Jamboree Class, Workshop and Exhibit Hall Schedules

The Southern California Genealogical Society (SCGS) Genealogy Jamboree 2017 Conference is only two weeks away - June 8 to 11, 2017.  


Here are links for the class and workshop schedules:

1)  Workshops (8 to 11 June, these have special registration and fees):  http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/workshops.html#Thursday

2)  Genetic Genealogy 2017 - "Diving Into DNA" (Thursday, 8 June 2017, 8:15 a.m. to 6 p.m.):  http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/schedule-dna.html

3)  Jambo-Free (Friday, 9 June 2017, 8:30 a.m. to 12 noon, FREE):  http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/schedule-jambofree.html

4)  Genealogy Jamboree Friday (9 June 2017, 1 p.m. to 6:30 p.m.):  http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/schedule-friday.html

5)  Genealogy Jamboree Saturday (10 June 2017, 8:30 a.m. to 6 p.m.):
http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/schedule-saturday.html

6)  Genealogy Jasmboree Sunday (11 June 2017, 8:30 a.m. to 3:30 p.m.)
http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/2017/schedule-sunday.html

7)  Exhibit Hall (FREE to attend, Friday, 12 noon to 6 p.m.; Saturday, 9 a.m. to 6 p.m.; Sunday, 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.):  http://www.genealogyjamboree.com/

I will be listing the classes that I might attend in future blog posts.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/scgs-genealogy-jamboree-class-workshop.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

Guest Post: "Appropriate Ways to Offer Condolences in the Workplace " by Suzie Kolber

Occasionally, I post guest articles on topics that I think are interesting and useful to genealogists and family historians.  Suzie Kolber, who writes on the www.ObituariesHelp.org web site, authored this post:

Appropriate Ways to Offer Condolences in the Workplace

You only know Jane to talk to her in the hall between your offices. You may send her an email

occasionally about a job-related question or say “hello” in a company-wide meeting once a month. Just last week you heard her father died and you’re scheduled to have a meeting with her in a few days.

You’re already feeling uncomfortable because you’re not sure what to say or how to act with someone who just suffered a loss.  Should you bring up the subject at all? Should you offer condolences? Should you get a card or buy flowers? Dealing with such a serious subject with a co-worker can be complicated.

Consider Your Relationship

If you only see Jane in passing and never have one-on-one conversations with her, it’s perfectly acceptable to not make mention of the situation at all. In fact, it may make her feel just as awkward as you. She doesn’t know you well and may not feel comfortable discussing such a personal subject.

On the other hand, if the co-worker is someone you know well and eat lunch with or have regular meetings with, you should broach the subject at an appropriate time. Avoiding it will be all too obvious, and it may make it awkward for both of you to talk to each other.

Consider the Situation

If you won’t see the person other than passing in the hall for a few weeks, it may be fine not to bring up the topic. However, if you are scheduled to have a meeting with them a week after the funeral, you may want to offer quick condolences. It could be a simple “How are you doing?” which the person will understand the underlying meaning.

If you arrive at the meeting early, you could say something short and sincere like “I heard about your dad, and I just want to say I’m sorry.” That’s it. No need to say more, but Jane will appreciate your thoughtfulness.

Consider the Method of Offering Condolences

You probably don’t want to talk about the person’s loss in a group situation. If you never talk to the person alone, it’s probably best not to bring up the loved one’s death. On the other hand, you will want to say something if you see them in an individual situation.

One of the best ways to offer condolences in a work environment is to send an email. You don’t have to make a big deal about it, but offer a few words to show your support and to let them know you are aware of their situation. Keep it short and to the point. You may say something like the following:

“I heard about the death of your father, and I wanted to give my condolences. Let me know if there’s anything I can do for you.”

“I’m sorry to hear about the loss of your dad, and I’ll be glad to take some extra work if you need the help.”

Just knowing the person has people who care and support them at work can make coming to the office every day a little easier for someone who just lost a loved one.

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Suzie Kolber is a writer at http://obituarieshelp.org/. The site is a complete guide for someone seeking help for writing obituaries, words of condolences, sympathy messages, condolence letters and funeral planning resources.

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The URL for this post is:  http://www.geneamusings.com/2017/05/guest-post-appropriate-ways-to-offer.html

Copyright (c) 2017, Randall J. Seaver


Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Google+ or Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.