Saturday, January 8, 2022

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Ancestor Score for 2022


Calling all Genea-Musings Fans:

It's Saturday Night again -

time for some more Genealogy Fun!!

 Your mission, should you decide to accept it (and I hope more of you do than participated in the last several SNGF challenges), is to:

1)  Determine how complete your genealogy research is.  For background, read Crista Cowan's post Family History All Done? What’s Your Number? and Kris Stewart's What Is Your Genealogy "Score?"  For comparison purposes, keep the list to 10 generations with you as the first person.  

2)  Create a table similar to Crista's second table, and fill it in however you can (you could create an Ahnentafel (Ancestor Name) list and count the number in each generation, or use some other method).  Tell us how you calculated the numbers.

3)  Show us your table, and calculate your "Ancestral Score" - what is your percentage of known names to possible names (1,023 for 10 generations).

4)  For extra credit (or more SNGF), do more generations and add them to your chart.

5)  Post your table, and your "Ancestor Score," on your own blog, in a comment to this post, or in a Facebook Status post.  Be sure to comment and leave a link to your post on this post.


Here's mine:

1)  I did this by creating an Ahnentafel Report in RootsMagic 8 (Publish > All Reports and Charts  > Ahnentafel Report) for 15 generations, then saved it as a text file, then copied it to Excel, and counted the lines for each generation.  The numbers included duplicate ancestral persons (due to marrying cousins) and persons I had either a first or last name for.

2)  My chart (if you want a blank chart in Microsoft Word format, please email me!).


Randy Seaver's Ancestral Name Score – January 2022

Generation
Relationship
Possible People
No. -- Sum1
Identified People
No. -- Sum2
Percentage
100*(Sum2/Sum1)
1
You

1
1
1
1
100.00%
2
Parents

2
3
2
3
100.00%
3
Grandparents

4
7
4
7
100.00%
4
1x Great-grandparents
8
15
8
15
100.00%
5
2x Great-grandparents
16
31
16
31
100.00%
6
3x Great-grandparents
32
63
30
61
96.83%
7
4x Great-grandparents
64
127
57
118
92.91%
8
5x Great-grandparents
128
255
100
218
85.49%
9
6x Great-grandparents
256
511
160
378
73.97%
10
7x Great-grandparents
512
1023
264
642
62.76%
11
8x Great-grandparents
1024
2047
404
1046
51.10%
12
9x Great-grandparents
2048
4095
574
1620
39.56%
13
10x Great-grandparents
4096
8191
469
2089
25.50%
14
11x Great-grandparents
8192
16383
323
2412
14.72%
15
12x Great-grandparents
16384
32767
194
2606
7.95%

3)  My "Ancestor Score" for 10 generations is:

*  Number of known ancestral names = 642
*  Number of possible ancestral names = 1,023
*  10 generation Ancestral Name Number = 642/1,023 = 62.76%

4)  Extra credit:  For 15 generations, I have 2,606 known Ancestral Names, out of 32,767 possible, for an Ancestor Score of 7.95% for 15 generations.

It really helps, in my case, to have a New England ancestry for about 50% of my 4th great-grandparents.  All of those New England ancestors have English ancestors and those are the lines back to the 15th generation.


Note:  I counted only persons in my Ahnentafel list that had at least a given name.  I didn't count persons with an unknown first name.  

The last time I did this was in January 2016 - Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - Your Ancestor Score for 2016.  So I've increased my 10 generation score by 117 ancestors, or 11.44%.

===========================================

The URL for this post is:  https://www.geneamusings.com/2022/01/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-your.html

Copyright (c) 2022, Randall J. Seaver

Please comment on this post on the website by clicking the URL above and then the "Comments" link at the bottom of each post.  Share it on Twitter, Facebook, Pinterest using the icons below.  Or contact me by email at randy.seaver@gmail.com.

8 comments:

ByAPearl said...

Here is my post:
https://geneajournalsbyapearl.wordpress.com/2022/01/08/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-ancestral-score/

Linda Stufflebean said...

Here's mine. I posted a few days ago: https://emptybranchesonthefamilytree.com/2022/01/my-2022-ancestor-count/

Liz said...

Here's mine:

https://gatapleytree.blogspot.com/2022/01/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-your.html

Randy, I actually had fun doing this! LOL

Liz

Lisa S. Gorrell said...

Here is mine:

https://mytrailsintothepast.blogspot.com/2022/01/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-your.html

Tess said...

I'm going to sound stupid here (numbers have never been my friend - that's why I'm a librarian)...but your table confuses me. What is the second column People No. Sum 2. Where do I get that? Why is it one less than I think it should be, yet everything adds to 100%. Keep in mind, I still have horror flashbacks when someone says the phrase "Two trains are leaving a station going in opposite directions...." and be gentle.

Randy Seaver said...

Tess,

Column 3 (Possible People No.) is the number of Possible People in each generation.

Column 4 (Possible People Sum1) is the sum of Possible People down to that row. Hence for Generation 4, it is the Column 3 numbers summed from generation 1 to 4 (e.g, 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 = 15)

Column 5 (Identified People No.) is the number of Identified People in each generation.

Column 6 (Identified People Sum2) is the sum of Identified People down to that row. Hence for Generation 4, it is the Column 5 numbers summed from generation 1 to 4 (e.g, 1 + 2 + 4 + 8 = 15)

Column 7 is Sum1 divided by Sum2 times 100 to get the percentage down the generations.

Of course, I always loved the challenge of two trains, but the Library of Congress book indexing system confused me. I could figure out the Dewey Decimal system.

Tess said...

Thanks, but I'm still confounded. Just can't get my head around it. I would have thought that I could only have two possible parents, not three. Guess I'll skip this one :(

Grandpa Landmeier said...

Can you email me a blank ancestral chart from Saturday? jimlandmeier@msn.com
Hope you and Linda are doing okay. Take care of yourself first so you can continue to take care of her. Life and love are precious.