Saturday, November 9, 2013

Saturday Night Genealogy Fun - This Week's Genealogy Highlight

It's Saturday Night - 
time for more Genealogy Fun! 



Your mission, should you decide to accept it (cue the Mission Impossible! music) is to:


1) What genealogy fun have you had this week?  What is your genealogy highlight of the week?  It could be finding a new ancestor, reading a new genealogy book, hearing a speaker at a seminar or society program, watching a webinar or Hangout On Air, or anything else that you have enjoyed.

2)  Tell us about it in a blog post on your own blog, in a comment to this post, or in a Google Plus or Facebook post.


Here's mine:

This week's highlight for me has to be the Crowdsurcing work done by Genea-Musings readers to help me find the death date of my friend John's grandfather (Louis B. Powell) , and then to find out more about his grandmother (Ethel).

I have had a series of posts, including:


This once again demonstrates the power of genealogy blogging to help a researcher find resources that s/he either doesn't know about or cannot access due to distance or time.

In this case, it has enabled me to build a family tree in genealogy software for my friend John in a week's time.


copyright (c) 2013, Randall J. Seaver

7 comments:

Antra said...

My genealogy highlight this week has been publishing my genea-fiction short story on my <a href="http://www.celmina.com/fiction>fiction blog</a>. I'm intending on turning it into a novel series, so I'm hoping for a positive response! I'm also embracing the crowdsourcing model, in the form of crowdfunding, by turning to Kickstarter to fund the production of the first novel in the series, which will be set predominantly in the US. Will it work? I don't know, but a mention by some big name genealogy blogger could certainly help drive some extra interest :) Everyone could use some more genealogy fiction in their lives, and writing this series has given me a new appreciation for the historical context of our ancestors' lives - records can only tell us so much of their story. This is why, in the past year or so, I've also moved away from talking about records in my blog posts, and started to talk more about history - because it is only through history that we understand our ancestors' lives. And fiction is a good way to get people interested in history!

Antra said...

Oops, messed up the link there - this will take you to my fiction blog.

Donna Peterson said...

Hi Randy! Here is the link to my Saturday Night Fun http://hangingwithdonna.blogspot.com/2013/11/saturday-night-genealogy-fun-proof-of.html?spref=fb

Lisa Gorrell said...

My genealogy fun was today. I did 6 consultations with wonderful people at the joint California Genealogical Society/Ancestry.com Day in San Francisco. One man was so excited that I found the location of his Polish village in the Austrian Empire and broke his brick wall!

Barbara said...

I knocked down a brick wall that has been standing strong for 10 years. Surname: Miller (Mueller), locale: NYC. Is it any wonder I had a hard time. To add to the wonder of it, the 1960 Census listed the actual town of origin in Germany. Woohoo!!!!

Janice Harshbarger said...

I found marriage records confirming the maiden name of husband's fourth great grandmother. Since I know have a location and a maiden name, I'm hoping that maybe we can find the parents of this happy couple. Meanwhile, I'm Happy Genealogy Dancing, for sure!

Howland Davis said...

This one is easy. On Monday, 28 October, I left Springfield MO and drove to Cathage MO where I took pictures of a house that a collateral ancestor lived in. Then I went to the cemetery where that branch of the family was buried and took pictures of the graves [not as good as 'I Remember When' took for Find A Grave; well done!]. Then on to Kansas going to Pittsburg, Cherokee, Scammon (looking at Scammon graves) and Columbus cemeteries with pictures taken.
This week's genealogical fun is organizing the pictures, entering information into my family compilation, into my software and storing the pictures correectly (hard-copy and electronically).
What a blast.