Monday, September 15, 2014

10th Annual Genealogy Conference and Cruise to Mexican Riviera

I received this via email today from Craig Scott:



10th Annual Genealogy Conference and Cruise
The largest family history conference on the seas!

Hosted by HeritageBooks.com in consultation with Wholly Genes, Inc.

November 29 - December 6, 2014
Approximately 17 hours of genealogy, technology and DNA lectures presented by the preeminent experts in their fields.

Join us for an educational and fun-filled voyage from Los Angeles to Puerto Vallarta then on to Mazatlan, then on to Cabo San Lucas and back to Los Angeles, while we learn about genealogical research methods, sources, tools, technologies and DNA from some of the foremost experts in those fields.

You will be among friends (old and new) and fellow researchers from around the world as you soak up new knowledge and skills through a lecture series that rivals any regional or national genealogy conference - but at one remarkably-low price that includes meals, taxes, port charges, onboard entertainment, and conference events.

As popular as our lecture series is, many veterans of our conference value something else even more. That is the opportunity to share a meal with a world-class genealogist or to schedule one-on-one time to discuss their specific research challenges. Come armed with your records and be prepared to hear about new resources, repositories, and finding aids that will help you to break down those brick walls. Some people find these private consultations alone to be worth the trip. Several evening group brickwall discussions add to the learning experience.

Bring your spouse/companion who will find plenty to do on board while you enhance your research skills. Then spend the meals, evenings, and port days together for a truly memorable vacation!
What could be better than a cruise to the warm waters of the Mexican Riviera, and a first-class genealogy conference all rolled into one???

This event is nearly always sold out so register early to avoid missing your chance to join us!

The speakers and their topics are:

Angie Bush, MS, BS

  • DNA Test Results - What Do I Do Now?
    Many people take a DNA test expecting it to be a "magic bullet" that solves years of research problems. When the results are returned, it is often a much different story, and can be difficult to know what to do to use DNA as a tool to answer long-standing research questions. Learn which parts of the test results are most useful, how to get to these areas on the company websites, and a brief review of the most helpful third party tools that can be used to answer these questions.
  • Using Traditional DNA Tests in Genealogical Research
    DNA tests that can help in tracing direct paternal or direct maternal lines have been available for approximately 15 years. In that time, they have been used to help resolve many questions of kinship and identity. This presentation will cover the types of research questions best suited to being answered by a traditional, direct-line test, and present case studies where direct line testing either provided new research avenues or solved a long-standing question.
  • Using Autosomal DNA Tests in Genealogical Research
    Autosomal DNA testing is the newest type of testing available for genealogical research, and has been gaining in popularity for the last two years or so. Unlike direct-line testing, autosomal DNA testing allows information to be gathered about all ancestral lines, rather than just a persons direct paternal or maternal line. Many have had success in using autosomal testing to finally resolve long-standing genealogical questions. The types of questions for which autosomal testing should be used for will be presented along with examples of actual research situations where autosomal DNA testing was used successfully.
  • The Genealogical Proof Standard and DNA Testing
    The Genealogical Proof Standard consists of five components: 1) a reasonably exhaustive search, 2) complete and accurate source citations, 3) analysis, 4) resolution of conflicting evidence and 5) a soundly written conclusion. We will discuss when DNA testing should be used as part of a reasonably exhaustive search, and how to cite these results and analyze them in context of a genealogical research question to arrive at a conclusion that meets the requirements of the GPS.

Cyndi Ingle

  • Evernote for Every Genealogist
    Evernote is a free software tool that is a dream come true for the online researcher. Clip notes from the web, write notes, record audio or webcam notes, and more. Sync your research notebooks on the web, with your computer and every mobile device you own so that your research notes are with you everywhere you go. Learn the ins and outs of this valuable tool for your daily research routine.
  • Advanced Googling for Your Grandma
    Chances are that you are using Google on a daily basis. Chances are even better than you aren't using it to its full potential. Learn about Google's advance search options, as well as several more tools offered by Google that will enhance your research. We'll dig deep into a variety of Google's free resources and learn how to make them work for you.
  • The Hidden Web: Digging Deeper
    When Google and traditional search engines don't return useful information, don't stop there. We will explore resources that are invisible to Google and hidden deep within web sites and proprietary databases. The "hidden web" lies buried within the collections for commercial web sites, libraries, archives, and museums. We will also talk about the importance of indexes that deep-link into web sites online, thus uncovering hidden gems of information that may not be found easily through a search engine query.
  • Find the Silver Lining In the Cloud
    The cloud is becoming home to many tools and functions that make our computing life easier every day. Learn which tools are useful for your genealogical research and how to implement those tools for optimum productivity.

Bill Litchman

  • The Underpinnings of the Genealogical Proof Standard
    The Genealogical Proof Standard is not a simple statement or process to work toward a proof. Why do we need such a complex approach to a simple idea? Don't we just need the facts? With factual truth proofs should be obvious. What's the big deal? This discussion explores the foundation of proof and how it is used in the several fields which depend on proof. The special case of genealogical proof will be shown and how the Genealogical Proof Standard helps us to understand proof and what it means for our use of documentary evidence.
  • Methodology and Analytical Thought: The Neher Case Study
    Often a research problem starts with the revelation of some new fact or person who enters on a developing research scene unannounced. We begin to try to find the person or expand on the new circumstances only to find that we have a whole new problem with a minimal starting point. What kind of logic can we use to identify the right way to start a problem given just a few facts? Are there any principles which could apply generally enough to be useful in a wide range of research problems? Are there any universal starting points? Should we immediately go to the census when we begin our work? This discussion will provide a case study which begins with a single (possibly) unrelated document. Through the proper choice of starting direction, the problem of the identity of a previously unknown participant can be solved and a whole "new" life for him explored. At the same time a previously unknown marriage was exposed for a well-understood ancestor!
  • Methodology and Analytical Thought: The Stockton Case Study
    Often a research problem starts with the revelation of some new fact or person who enters on a developing research scene unannounced. We begin to try to find the person or expand on the new circumstances only to find that we have a whole new problem with a minimal starting point. What kind of logic can we use to identify the right way to start a problem given just a few facts? Are there any principles which could apply generally enough to be useful in a wide range of research problems? Are there any universal starting points? Should we immediately go to the census when we begin our work? This discussion will provide a case study which begins with a single (possibly) unrelated document. Through the proper choice of starting direction, the problem of the identity of a previously unknown participant can be solved and a whole "new" life for him explored. At the same time a previously unknown marriage was exposed for a well-understood ancestor!
  • Proper Research Log Use
    The basics of research practice place some obvious burdens on the researcher to perform certain tasks to ensure that what we report to others about our work can be believed. Without these practices we only have our word to show that we have found and are telling the truth. In addition, if we do things correctly from the first, we won't need to go back and repeat things to make up for our own shortcomings. A properly kept research log can solve most of the problems that sloppiness in research practices produces. We may not like it but it's true!

J. Mark Lowe, CG, FUGA

  • Research in the South and Everywhere Else: Review, Prepare and Plan
    Major concepts to consider with your family research project include migration, settlement patterns, religion, land and geography. Learn how to find available resources and develop a strategy to find ancestors.
  • Constructing an Ancestor Through Mortgages, Trust Deeds and Personal Agreements
    Learn how these financial instruments reveal circumstances about your ancestor and how they may lead you to new clues and deeper understanding.
  • Making Those Pre-1850 Census Records Talk to You
    Stop avoiding those pre-1850 census records. Turn those 1's and 0's into clues and lively pictures of your family.
  • My Ancestor, the Farmer: Shaping a profile for your Rural Ancestor
    Farming is a proud and honorable occupation. Develop a rich profile of your farming ancestor and community using available resources.

Craig Roberts Scott, MA, CG, FUGA

  • Researching a Revolutionary War Hessian Soldier
    The Hessian's came, some got captured, some deserted, some fought for us, some stayed, some went home. Meanwhile, everyone thinks they either have a Hessian or an Indian princess.
  • Epidemics and Pandemics
    People disappear from the records. Sometimes portions of whole families just disappear. And we don't know why.
  • Pension Ledgers, Vouchers, Last and Final Payments
    Pension research is more than working the indexes and obtaining the pension application file. There is pension law, pension ledgers, payment vouchers and correspondence. All important to the exhaustive search.
  • A Confederate Case Study: David Beard of Virginia
    Confederate research is more than collecting the compiled military service record. It includes the census, correspondence, unit histories, diaries, and pensions.
This looks like a fun cruise in warm waters - just before the North American winter sets in!  With world class speakers and interesting topics, it's an educational opportunity too!



3 comments:

Karen Palmer said...

Randy,
The headline says cruise to Alaska but the itinerary gives Mexican locations. I'm thinking in December Mexico sounds a whole lot warmer.

Randy Seaver said...

Thanks, Karen! I forgot to correct that after reading it...I updated it.

Geolover said...

The press release is defective (duplicate text in 2 of Bill Litchman's items).

The flyer says one can register at the bookstore site. One cannot do this.

No pricing or scheduling information is provided.

Possibly the announcement should have waited until some of the pesky details were firmed up.